Explore the galaxy with Chrome experiment '100,000 Stars'

There are hundreds of ways to explore (parts of) the Milky Way galaxy online and even on your smartphone if you have the right app, but what about one that can explore all of it?

That's just what Google have done with with a new web experiment called 100,000 Stars

 ..using imagery and data from a range of sources, including NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), we were recently able to take one small step in that direction by plotting the location of the stars closest to our sun. 

And it's impressive.

As the blog post points out: "Using your mouse or trackpad, you can zoom in and out to explore our galaxy. Zooming in reveals the names of the most prominent stars close to our sun". Clicking each name shows more info on the star, and a digital rendition is shown.

There's also an option to take a tour at the top left of the page, and the site uses Chrome’s support for WebGL, CSS3D, and Web Audio.

Unfortunately the site doesn't work in Internet Explorer 10, but it will render in Firefox following our own testing, as well as Opera and Safari which all support WebGL. Check it out!

Source: Google Chrome Blog

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22 Comments

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Wow, very cool.

This reminds me of playing 'Frontier / Elite II' on my Amiga...the framerate was pretty close too (no WebGL hardware acceleration on this XP machine...).

Cool. I really think Google Sky Maps (for those interested in this stuff) is the coolest Android app. This is a neat followup.

The information is not consistent. I would like it better if every star contained classification, mass, brightness, etc.

It would also be nicer if you could pan/slide the scene...

Edited by Tuishimi, Nov 15 2012, 4:32pm :

GP007 said,
And this doesn't run on IE10 why exactly? I don't suppose they'd rather you use Chrome, nah, that can't be it.

IE10 has no support for WebGL. No WebGL = no fancy in-browser 3D graphics. Live with it. It does work in Opera, Firefox, Chrome and Safari.

GP007 said,
And this doesn't run on IE10 why exactly? I don't suppose they'd rather you use Chrome, nah, that can't be it.

Why not? This is exactly how they work. Developers can chose the tools he wants to use and it's a developers choice to use tools that work on all browsers, or use tools that only work on some browsers.

They specificly chose to use Webgl what is a tool IE doesn't use because of big security issues. It's their choice to use specificly that for making it all work.

So is it on purpose? Yes. But Microsoft does the same thing. How many times did tons of functionality in Hotmail not work in other browsers? Times have changed but Microsoft makes alot of stuff just for IE9+ that won't work on other browsers.

They both think that makes people switch. I don't believe that makes any change, but that my opinion.

GP007 said,
And this doesn't run on IE10 why exactly? I don't suppose they'd rather you use Chrome, nah, that can't be it.

Because people choose to support non standards.

Ambroos said,

IE10 has no support for WebGL. No WebGL = no fancy in-browser 3D graphics. Live with it. It does work in Opera, Firefox, Chrome and Safari.

I'm living with it just fine thanks. I dunno why you sound so mad about it though.