FBI ordered to copy 150 terabytes of data in MegaUpload case

The MegaUpload saga continued earlier this week in a courtroom in New Zealand as a judge has order the US Federal Bureau of Investigation to start copying data from the PCs that were seized from MegaUpload's founder Kim Dotcom. The New Zealand Herald website reports that the amount of data to be copied by the FBI is a whopping 150 terabytes, including 10 million emails.

The FBI seized Dotcom's PCs, along with other property of his, as part of its raid on the MegaUpload file sharing website in January. The US government claims that MegaUpload and its organizers participated in extensive amounts of online content piracy. In late May, another New Zealand judge said that the government had three weeks to turn over the evidence it collected against MegaUpload and Dotcom to their defense lawyers.

In this week's court visit, government lawyers told High Court Justice Helen Winkelmann that there was simply too much data to copy in the court-ordered three week time span. The lawyers claimed it took 10 days to copy just 29 terabytes. However, Justice Winkelmann ordered that the government start the process of copying the information anyway.

In the meantime, Dotcom and three of MegaUpload's other team members are still awaiting a hearing in August that could determine if they are extradited to the US to face the online piracy charges.

Source: New Zealand Herald

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Facebook settles "Sponsored Stories" lawsuit, will pay charity

Next Story

Fake Word app appears on iOS App Store

19 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

FBI is most likely too busy watching all the shows on those drives! No time to copy, must finish the season!

Wow, the FBI is forced to transmit piracy through their network to copy the data. You KNOW 150TB of data isn't all personal files, LOL.

ScottDaMan said,
Wow, the FBI is forced to transmit piracy through their network to copy the data. You KNOW 150TB of data isn't all personal files, LOL.

LOL I bet a good majority of it is LOL, LOL some people actually used it like most people use dropbox LOL wierd right LOL

What will they do with the data once the trial is done with?

Erase it, yes, officially, but some officials might just have some fin with all that data.

Jaybonaut said,
As if they didn't already do this.

They didn't, that's why they have to. I hear your implications and raise you a reality.

JJ_ said,
I hope the FBI avoid Seagate drives

I've used Seagate drives for over 15 years and haven't had any problems with them - my oldest drive has been powered on for over 23,000hrs / 975 days. Yet I've had several Western Digital drives fail within just a year. As always a lot of it comes down to personal experience and some people might have had the exact opposite experience. But I always recommend Seagate drives because I have found them to be the most reliable.

.
The FBI IS committing piracy now!
"FBI ordered to copy 150 terabytes of data in MegaUpload case"

Sigh. And people blame torrenters for copying via Internet other peoples' files....
Such shame

Jose_49 said,
.
The FBI IS committing piracy now!
"FBI ordered to copy 150 terabytes of data in MegaUpload case"

Sigh. And people blame torrenters for copying via Internet other peoples' files....
Such shame

they should start seeding them too

Using the 10 day estimate provided by the FBI they are copying data at about 250 MB/s and the full 150TB should only take 53 days. But I imagine they could speed that up a little bit if they spread it out over multiple devices then moved it to a central location over a high speed network connection.

PaulDr said,
Using the 10 day estimate provided by the FBI they are copying data at about 250 MB/s and the full 150TB should only take 53 days. But I imagine they could speed that up a little bit if they spread it out over multiple devices then moved it to a central location over a high speed network connection.

There are ways they can copy that data VERY quickly, but they're choosing not to in an effort to stall the courts and try to harm the case for the defense.

They can "order" them to do whatever they want, but the FBI doesn't fall under the jurisdiction of New Zealand Courts, also this part in the story holds true as well

Crown lawyers on behalf of the US Government sought a judicial review of that decision on the grounds the District Court could not make a ruling under the Extradition Act.

The lawyers for the US Government argued Dotcom and his associates have access to some documents, including emails and their bank account records.

They said that under US law, disclosure is only granted once the accused appears in a US court.

xendrome said,
They can "order" them to do whatever they want, but the FBI doesn't fall under the jurisdiction of New Zealand Courts, also this part in the story holds true as well

Thats a bit ironic as I don't see where the FBI have jurisdiction in New Zealand to seize and arrest for allegedly violating US law, then complain when they have to prove it.
I applaud the New Zealand government for standing up for their people and wanting proof before blindly extraditing them for a US decided fate.

The_Decryptor said,
But at the same time, if the US doesn't show their evidence the NZ courts could just "block" the extradition request.

Yup playing ball goes both ways. IF they don't the case will simply fall on it's arse which is pretty much going to be the end result anyway. Not that it matters anyway as they have achieved the first goal. Anything else is just a bonus.

xendrome said,
They can "order" them to do whatever they want, but the FBI doesn't fall under the jurisdiction of New Zealand Courts, also this part in the story holds true as well

Not respecting the court decision of a civilised country like New Zealand would hurt USA international relationship image even more than it curently is.

Not a good idea imo.