Firefox 16.0 released, download now available

Mozilla Firefox is a fast, full-featured Web browser. Firefox includes pop-up blocking, tab-browsing, integrated Google search, simplified privacy controls, a streamlined browser window that shows you more of the page than any other browser and a number of additional features that work with you to help you get the most out of your time online.

The Web is all about innovation, and Firefox sets the pace with dozens of new features to deliver a faster, more secure and customizable Web browsing experience for all.

User Experience. The enhancements to Firefox provide the best possible browsing experience on the Web. The new Firefox smart location bar, affectionately known as the "Awesome Bar," learns as people use it, adapting to user preferences and offering better fitting matches over time.

Performance. Firefox is built on top of the powerful new Gecko platform, resulting in a safer, easier to use and more personal product.

Security. Firefox raises the bar for security. The new malware and phishing protection helps protect from viruses, worms, trojans and spyware to keep people safe on the Web.

Customization. Everyone uses the Web differently, and Firefox lets users customize their browser with more than 5,000 add-ons.

Download: Firefox 16.0 for Windows | 17.4 MB (Freeware)
Download: Firefox 16.0 for Linux | 18.9 MB
Download: Firefox 16.0 for MacOS | 33.3 MB
View: Firefox Website | Release Notes

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38 Comments

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I'm still surprised they haven't released an official non beta 64bit version.
No idea why some kinds of technology is embraced and pushed forward fast and hard
and others like a CPU architecture is left lagging a decade later.
x64 isn't new anymore Mozilla time to update your software its almost 2013.
I've done lots of x64 coding and its not that big a deal really.
For example i ported eMule to x64 (they too refuse to update their software)

@Author
I almost forgot to say thanks for posting ..i seen the news here first.

Still not available as an update through the browser, I know I can just download the locale version for my region but I prefer it to be done through the browser.

This was actually a great update. This boiler plate article doesn't really do it justice.

They completely rebuilt the garbage collection system. Firefox feels noticeably quicker and more responsive, because the new incremental garbage collector no longer freezes Firefox when processing. This Mozilla blog post explains the new GC very well - https://blog.mozilla.org/javas...cremental-gc-in-firefox-16/

This version also supports un-prefixing CSS3 Animations, Transitions, Transforms, and Gradients. This is a big deal, since it represents crucial HTML5 features being used in their standard finalized form.

More info the release notes - https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/16.0/releasenotes/

I hope they did implement the CSS3 transform property.... Would like to reduce code instead of using -moz-transform propery -_-

I wonder if they fixed the GPU hardware acceleration problems.
Nvidia driver default power mode (adaptive) + doing anything like scrolling a page
means lag and stuttering for me on Windows 7 x64.
Change the Nvidia setting to prefer max performance and the problem vanishes..
My Desktop sensor panel is what helped show me what was going on.
I can see clock rate changes on the fly.

With every version people are saying that new one is faster...
Remove your install and try v11 you will see which version is faster!

LAMj said,
"Mozilla Firefox is a fast...Web browser."

Oh I get it, that's the joke right neowin?

Windows <any version> is fast too..
BUT
what did the user do to it ?
If your smart you'll make sure your stuff is fast but i doubt most people care.
I've used very few addons for firefox and i have seen many people state
that they we're using all kinds of crazy crap i wouldn't even consider.
The problem ? the user. the solution ? the user.
Firefox runs fast for me i don't know what your problem is.
And maybe i could help but by your vague comment i get the feeling
your looking for a reason to not like firefox
I suggest staying on what I would be willing to bet is Chrome lol

Xahid said,
Nothing impressive change ...

When it comes to browsers baby step is the way to go.

The numbering may be ****** up but it's preferable to the once very 2 years update.

LaP said,

When it comes to browsers baby step is the way to go.

The numbering may be ****** up but it's preferable to the once very 2 years update.

I just wish they wouldn't do the numbering thing. Completely screws up testing software that require the browser version to stay the same.

ILikeTobacco said,
I just wish they wouldn't do the numbering thing. Completely screws up testing software that require the browser version to stay the same.

If you're coding to the browser version then you're doing it wrong...

Xahid said,
Nothing impressive change ...

What did you expect in a monthly update? They added incremental garbage collection to reduce UI lag, added support for the Opus codec, added support for web apps (like Chrome's) and also finalized the support for a lot of CSS3 properties by removing the prefix like Opera 12.50 and IE10 (after Chrome removes the prefixes as well developers will be able to use the official CSS3 syntaxes to target all browsers). That's still a lot of stuff for a release done in a month.

francescob said,

What did you expect in a monthly update? They added incremental garbage collection to reduce UI lag, added support for the Opus codec, added support for web apps (like Chrome's) and also finalized the support for a lot of CSS3 properties by removing the prefix like Opera 12.50 and IE10 (after Chrome removes the prefixes as well developers will be able to use the official CSS3 syntaxes to target all browsers). That's still a lot of stuff for a release done in a month.

I don't think so IGC will have slightest improvement for UI. UI does not even have Type Inference nor Ion Monkey, only few Jaeger Monkey stuff. Even though it is based on Javascript and XUL, Mozilla does not added IGC for this purpose.

Zlip792 said,

I don't think so IGC will have slightest improvement for UI. UI does not even have Type Inference nor Ion Monkey, only few Jaeger Monkey stuff. Even though it is based on Javascript and XUL, Mozilla does not added IGC for this purpose.

Well that's what they wrote on their blog: "Prior to incremental GC landing, Firefox was unable to do anything else during a collection: it couldn't respond to mouse clicks or draw animations or run JavaScript code. Most collections were quick, but some took hundreds of milliseconds. This downtime can cause a jerky, frustrating user experience. (On Macs, it causes the dreaded spinning beachball.)"

Since javascripts can already freeze the browser it makes sense that the garbage collection, that too can hang the browser, when improved could reduce the UI lag in resource-intensive pages.

francescob said,

Well that's what they wrote on their blog: "Prior to incremental GC landing, Firefox was unable to do anything else during a collection: it couldn't respond to mouse clicks or draw animations or run JavaScript code. Most collections were quick, but some took hundreds of milliseconds. This downtime can cause a jerky, frustrating user experience. (On Macs, it causes the dreaded spinning beachball.)"

Since javascripts can already freeze the browser it makes sense that the garbage collection, that too can hang the browser, when improved could reduce the UI lag in resource-intensive pages.

Then you should make it better sound by saying that you mean it on javascript heavy sites, overall IGC does not do much for User experience on UI while it do on content. Once Super snappy bug (if ever) fixed it will separate chrome from content then it will day of celebration.
Although they made FF18 quite snappy already.