First $25 Raspberry Pi samples made; coming in early 2013

In April, after months of anticipation, the UK-based Raspberry Pi Foundation finally began shipping the $35 version of their tiny and bare-bones Linux PC. The specs of the machine included a 700 MHz ARM11-based processor, 256 MB of RAM, two USB 2.0 ports, an Ethernet port and an HDMI port. Later, the team added 512 MB of RAM to the $35 model.

However, the Raspberry Pi Foundation had also announced plans to launch an even cheaper $25 (plus tax and shipping) version of their PC. Today, the group revealed that the first engineering samples of the $25 "Model A" PC had finally been made in their Wales facility.

The Model A PC will have 256 MB of RAM, but will have just one USB port and no Ethernet port. The $25 model will also use much less power than the current $35 "Model B". The group added:

We’re seeing demand for the Model A from people making industrial control modules, from roboticists, from people doing automation, for a bunch of headless operations – and, significantly, for people who want to use the Pi as a very cheap media centre.

The team hopes to start shipment of the Model A Raspberry Pi PC in early 2013. Meanwhile, the group said that the Model B version has seen 429,000 units shipped from one of their two distributors. They do not have figures from their other distributor yet, but they expect those shipment numbers to be "only a little lower."

Source: Raspberry Pi Foundation | Image via Raspberry Pi Foundation

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19 Comments

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technikal said,
Will it run Crysis though?

It'll run a control board to boot your computer when you enter your house and ensure crysis is ready to go when you enter your room..... So technically, yes?

srbeen said,

It'll run a control board to boot your computer when you enter your house and ensure crysis is ready to go when you enter your room..... So technically, yes?

No it won't...

ingramator said

No it won't...

Why won't it? You can easily connect your front door to a proximity/reed switch then wire that to the pi's GPIO. when triggered (broke) it could control a power relay and/or the ATX power switch. Open your front door 3 times lets say triggers the computer to power on. Then use a simple timer script to wait for it to boot, then over the network remote into the PC and execute a command to boot the game....

Complete overkill, a PIC chip and a few components could do the same thing for $4 via USB. But the pi would give you more possibilities.

I was at a Java conference a few weeks back and almost all their TV's were powered by Raspberry Pi's in clear cases. They had live information about the sessions and stuff. Brilliant little devices!

intersting, a 25 dollar computer? can it play dos games? can i mod it to fit in a gameboy-type case and make it a hand held emulator?

Izlude said,
intersting, a 25 dollar computer? can it play dos games? can i mod it to fit in a gameboy-type case and make it a hand held emulator?

No, it doesn't and emulation will run at an incredibly slow speed, if you can get it to run at all.

n_K said,

No, it doesn't and emulation will run at an incredibly slow speed, if you can get it to run at all.

Actually, I'm pretty sure there is a working Dosbox for it so you can play at least some Dos games.

Izlude said,
intersting, a 25 dollar computer? can it play dos games? can i mod it to fit in a gameboy-type case and make it a hand held emulator?

I kind of see this as a competitor to Arduino but they each have their strengths and weaknesses. Most of my projects I feel more comfortable with Arduino. If I had a project that I wanted a web site type interface or wanted to use something like an HDTV as an output than then Pi looks like the better product. You can also use the two platforms in concert.

Shadrack said,

I kind of see this as a competitor to Arduino but they each have their strengths and weaknesses. Most of my projects I feel more comfortable with Arduino. If I had a project that I wanted a web site type interface or wanted to use something like an HDTV as an output than then Pi looks like the better product. You can also use the two platforms in concert.

They are completely different. One runs linux, the other a RTOS. You can use the Pi for all your stuff like wireless, Python and graphics programming. The Arduino is designed for electronics programming so you can use it to pulse width modulate (Ok you can on the Pi but it only has one output) read analogue/digital sensors and best of all attach a heap of shields to expand functionality! I'm currently using it for a robotics project and the two work together. The Pi handles high level languages and logic and writes serial data to the arduino to carry out the electronics work.

SirEvan said,
no ethernet? fail

The Model B comes with Ethernet. But I suspect a lot of people will be using WiFi Adaptors in their Pi's for portability sake.

SirEvan said,
no ethernet? fail

How is it a fail? Schools don't need ethernet.
Hobbists don't need ethernet.
Embedded devices don't need ethernet.

SirEvan said,
no ethernet? fail

This is a hobbyist device! If the project you are working on needs ethernet, you buy the one with ethernet. If it doesn't require ethernet then why pay extra for it? If you get the one that doesn't have ethernet and end up needing ethernet afterall you hack it in somehow. If you don't know how to hack it in somehow or even where to start on figuring that out then this product is probably not for you.

SirEvan said,
no ethernet? fail

Spend the $10 on a wifiN dongle and be done with it. libcec does IR control with your TV remote.. what more could you want? This is absolutely the cheapest media center going and 256MB ram works fine. GPIO is what matters to the industrial/robotic guy. $45 is steep for a 'broke-out chip'

Glad they reduced the power consumption even further....