First 4 TB hard drive on sale in Japan

While there may be a PC hard drive shortage that is making things hard for both PC manufacturers and for people who just want to buy a replacement drive, that isn't stopping hard drive makers from continuing to add storage space to their platters. MaximumPC.com now reports that Hitachi has reportedly become the first such hard drive maker to create an internal PC hard drive with a whopping 4 TB of storage space.

The new world record holder on internal hard drive space was spotted on sale in Japan by a local web site, Akiba PC Watch, but so far the company itself has yet to officially announce the product. The hard drive itself, which is part of Hitachi's Deskstar line, has a SATA 6Gbps interface along with 32 MB of cache. It also has the company's proprietary CoolSpin technology which is supposed to allow the hard drive to run both quieter and with less heat.

The price for the new Hitachi Deskstar 4 TB hard drive? If you buy it in Japan it will set you back 26,800 yen, or about $345. Again, with the current hard drive shortage due to the flooding in Thailand, that's a lot of money to spend on some extra data storage space for your PC. We suspect that other hard drive makers will be introducing their own 4 TB hard drives in the very near future.

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33 Comments

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Why isn't any "wireless hard drive" ? i seriously hate wire and is not about storage anymore. It's about making the hard drive work more smarter and intelligent! Not increasing the storage. Because when it fail. 4TB of files is driving the consumer crazy to losing all the stuff. Yes,you can use some recovery tool,but it's not worth risking it! in fact,the adoption of USB 3.0 is not fully mainstream yet! Thunderbolt can be the future,but to me it might end up another firewire~ which is sad!

Futuristic1 said,
Why isn't any "wireless hard drive" ? i seriously hate wire and is not about storage anymore. It's about making the hard drive work more smarter and intelligent! Not increasing the storage. Because when it fail. 4TB of files is driving the consumer crazy to losing all the stuff. Yes,you can use some recovery tool,but it's not worth risking it! in fact,the adoption of USB 3.0 is not fully mainstream yet! Thunderbolt can be the future,but to me it might end up another firewire~ which is sad!

There is. It's called Network Attached Storage (NAS). But wireless is very slow compared to a wire.
And they have solutions for data loss, it's called backups and or mirroring drives. You need to buy multiple drives which will hold the same data. These problems of yours have been solved for years.

Futuristic1 said,
Why isn't any "wireless hard drive" ? i seriously hate wire and is not about storage anymore. It's about making the hard drive work more smarter and intelligent! Not increasing the storage. Because when it fail. 4TB of files is driving the consumer crazy to losing all the stuff. Yes,you can use some recovery tool,but it's not worth risking it! in fact,the adoption of USB 3.0 is not fully mainstream yet! Thunderbolt can be the future,but to me it might end up another firewire~ which is sad!

HDD's are designed to go inside your computer/laptop. Does it really matter that its connected via a wire?

Kushan said,

HDD's are designed to go inside your computer/laptop. Does it really matter that its connected via a wire?

I guess if he really wants to, he can use cloud storage.

Thailand make 60% of all WD drives and they got one factory back on line last week and expect another in 10 days. Amazon has 2tv from $159.99 to 162.99 WD Green 2tb WD20EARS and WD20EARX S=ATA=300 and X=ATA-600. I only use green in my media server cheaper drive and run with less power. I don't have any issues steaming over my home network.

When is this ridiculous pricing going to end? Looks like these hard disk companies are cashing in on opportunity. Even though the floods are real and damage was substantial, does that warrant 3x price increase? Is it that Thailand has THE ONLY world's hard drive and it's parts producing factories?
If these companies are that much affected, how do they release a newer model in middle of a crisis?
I hope these companies are investigated over this matter.

sanke1 said,
When is this ridiculous pricing going to end? Looks like these hard disk companies are cashing in on opportunity. Even though the floods are real and damage was substantial, does that warrant 3x price increase? Is it that Thailand has THE ONLY world's hard drive and it's parts producing factories?
If these companies are that much affected, how do they release a newer model in middle of a crisis?
I hope these companies are investigated over this matter.

Have you not seen the stories on drive shortages? It's called supply and demand. When there is less of a product available you jack up the cost. Thats how business works.

Epic0range said,

Have you not seen the stories on drive shortages? It's called supply and demand. When there is less of a product available you jack up the cost. Thats how business works.

supply has gone down 50% on some drives; prices have gone up to 300%. That isnt supply/demand. Why it it gas prices go up 1 cent and people claim manipulation but hard drive prices triple right before xmas and no one is asking questions?

Pupik said,
Hopefully, this will bring the prices of SSDs down, by A LOT. For that price, you only get 256gb in SSD.

Why would it
different technology
different market
different use

DrakeN2k said,

Why would it
different technology
different market
different use


The only thing right you got, was "different technology". Still used to store data, and sold on the same market.

Pupik said,

The only thing right you got, was "different technology". Still used to store data, and sold on the same market.

Nope, hes right. The market for SSD's are more enthusiasts than general users, due to their price and size. SSD's are used for OS partitions, 4TB drives are used for storage of large amounts of content. You wouldn't use an SSD to store your movie collection.

Pupik said,
Hopefully, this will bring the prices of SSDs down, by A LOT. For that price, you only get 256gb in SSD.

It won't. Even the shortage won't have a huge effect. In the short term it may actually increase the price of SSD if the demand goes up. It takes a bit of time for the supply to increase.

Let's see, 8 of these in RAID 6 with two drive fail protection and a hot rebuild spare = 20 TB of WIN. Yeah, they are going to have to be cheaper than $350 before I upgrade... Although I seriously doubt my existing RAID controller will support 4 TB drives. But I'm surprised they aren't selling for more than $350. Given that the 2Tb drives I bought this spring for $70 per are now listed as 200.

Vannos said,
Pfft, RAID is falling out of fasion.

Um, no. It's been actively used for many years and will continue to be used for many, many more. You'll find that at least 90% of business run some form of RAID10 or at least RAID5.

Goldfire86 said,

Um, no. It's been actively used for many years and will continue to be used for many, many more. You'll find that at least 90% of business run some form of RAID10 or at least RAID5.

What's the point of RAID other than mirroring for hard drives? If you want speed, get an SSD. Stripe those if you want, but not hard drives. Hard drives are now for mass, slow storage only.

mrp04 said,

What's the point of RAID other than mirroring for hard drives? If you want speed, get an SSD. Stripe those if you want, but not hard drives. Hard drives are now for mass, slow storage only.

Oh how your ignorance shows. The R in RAID stands for Redundant. RAID 0, which it seems you're referring to, is the only type of RAID in which there is no redundancy. RAID was created to mitigate data loss due to hard drive failures as you can lose at least one hard drive without losing ANY data either by mirroring or parity.

Vannos said,
Pfft, RAID is falling out of fasion.

mrp04 said,
What's the point of RAID other than mirroring for hard drives? If you want speed, get an SSD. Stripe those if you want, but not hard drives. Hard drives are now for mass, slow storage only.

Intel's Matrix RAID is awesome and has been for years!!

mrp04 said,

What's the point of RAID other than mirroring for hard drives? If you want speed, get an SSD. Stripe those if you want, but not hard drives. Hard drives are now for mass, slow storage only.

Like Fred 69 mentioned, it's for redundancy. You can stripe data across very large volumes and mirror at the same time. It's usually cheaper getting several smaller HDD's as opposed to a single, large HDD. SSD's are still not large enough to compete with HDD's, especially at a price point. (Before the floods that is)

xpclient said,

Intel's Matrix RAID is awesome and has been for years!!

As far as RAID0, RAID1 and RAID10 goes, Intel onboard solutions are fine. If you need RAID5, RAID6 or even RAID50, you'll need a dedicated RAID card for parity calculations.

Slugsie said,
True. But then again if you had 4x 1TB drives then you would have 4x the chance of a drive failing.

If one dies, you lose 1TB, if 4TB dies, you lose all 4TB. Probability is however, a 4TB will die before all 4 X 1 TB drives die.

Either way, there is absolutely NO substitute for back up of some sort.

Midnight Mick said,
More space on one drive = more stuff to lose when it fails...

I remember this being said when the first 100mb drives came out

Midnight Mick said,
More space on one drive = more stuff to lose when it fails...

It should be common knowledge and standard practise that if you are going to have a multi-terabyte worth of storage that you use some sort of redundancy just incase something fails. RAID5 would be the very least I'd use.

Midnight Mick said,
More space on one drive = more stuff to lose when it fails...

This argument never made any sense to me. If you don't back up your data it doesn't matter how much you have, you can lose it. Also if you don't have a big enough hard drive in the first place you wouldn't have had it to lose anyway.