First 512GB SSD offered for sale: $1500

SSDs have always been for those with a lot of cash and a lot of demand for speed, and after this new product introduction, things are still the same. SSDs, or solid state drives, are popular because they're fast and reliable. They feature no moving parts, so they don't suffer nearly as badly from knocks or drops as regular hard drives. Although, these benefits come with a price; these drives are typically much smaller in storage, and because they're a lot harder to manufacture, they're a great deal pricier too.

According to Techworld, a company named Super Talent has made a world first and debuted a 512GB SSD ready for consumers; the largest to ever be sold. There have been storage solutions similar to this, like a setup from OCZ that features 1TB of SSD storage by tightly packing four 265GB SSDs, but none have had this level of space in one drive before.

Now that Super Talent have come out and done this, expect to see others do the same. Toshiba have plans to get their own range of these ready; in the technology world, having the competitive advantage never lasts long. And yes, as you may have deducted from the title, this will render your wallet about $1500 worse off, so be sure to get a mortgage before you plan to upgrade to these.

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SSD drives are great. But for the price I wouldn't buy one yet. I would install one in a laptop if I ever owned a new one. The though of having solid state hard drive in something that gets carried around a lot feels safer. I have installed a 4 gig 300x Flash card with an flash to IDE adapter in one of my older laptops. Might not sound like much, but all I use it for is browsing the web. So I have a gig or so free. The thing screams.

SSD is usually rated for 100,000 write cycles.
SSD isn't where it needs to be to become worth its while. Price vs warranty vs performance compared to platter drives equivilant and SSD does NOT come out on top.

Sorry guys, my $1440 will be going to some new tires for my car, and for the $60 or so I'll get a 5 yr warranty WD and be just as happy.

poundsmack said,
that information is highly inacurate. go check out BitMicro.com, they have had flash drives of over 1TB for a while now.

is it on a single drive, or on a single drive setup containing multiple drives in a single enclosure?

cybertimber2008 said,
A flash drive and SSD are two very different devices, inside and out.

so,whats the difference between a flash drive and an SSD ? i thought SSD used flash memory?

Great to see the capacities increase and the prices to come down.
The only thing that still annoys me, is all those people who still believe in the "SSD Myth"; modern SSD do not die within a year or two, they last just as long (or longer) as regular HDDs.
Please do some research before you spread the same wrong "facts".

Till they can make them re-writeable just like regular hard drives I wont touch those drives ever. To me its the biggest waste of money.

Ledward, they are limited down to 1000 writes I think. But my point being they are limited in writes unlike mechanical hard drives which can write indefinitely.

-1 SSD user for the time being

Indefinitely?
And it's FAR more than 1000 writes, it's usually at least 10,000 writes. That might not sound like much, but most operations don't actually require a full write.
Essentially, they have about the same claimed lifespan as a regular Hard Drive - around 5 years on average. Sure, good ol' Mechanical drives can last longer than that, but many fail long before this.

Shunik Jan said,
Ledward, they are limited down to 1000 writes I think. But my point being they are limited in writes unlike mechanical hard drives which can write indefinitely.

-1 SSD user for the time being

Are you trying to troll?

SSDs are supposed to EASILY outlast any mechanical drive. "1000" isn't anywhere near the actual number, and with wear-leveling that issue becomes even less of a concern.


Shunik Jan said,
Ledward, they are limited down to 1000 writes I think. But my point being they are limited in writes unlike mechanical hard drives which can write indefinitely.

-1 SSD user for the time being


Actually, mechanical hard drives can't be written indefinitely; they too slowly wear. It's normal for bad sectors to start popping up all over the place during the life of a drive, but you normally wouldn't notice because the capacity of a hard disk these days is so large. Once upon a time, bad sector lists were printed onto the white labels stuck on to the top of hard drives, and buyers would sort through them to get one that had the least manufacturing defects. They don't do that anymore, but that's not because they don't have defects anymore... it's because the list would be too large, and it makes consumers unhappy with the product.

MLC NAND is normally rated 10,000 writes, SLC NAND is 100,000 writes. These numbers sound really scary (low) but with wear-leveling this is actually quite ok. Also, when NAND cells die they remain readable permanently (as opposed to magnetic storage just completely dying) so a backup and transfer to a new drive is always possible.

For example, my notebook (a HP Elitebook 6930p)'s hinges are rated at 25,000 cycles. That doesn't sound very high, but will probably last me double the life of the notebook for me.

Ledward said,
MLC NAND is normally rated 10,000 writes, SLC NAND is 100,000 writes. These numbers sound really scary (low) but with wear-leveling this is actually quite ok.

Just to clarify as this started by a misconception: That is PER CELL, not per device. Wear leveling shifts around which cell is being written to reduce the use of each individual cell as much as possible. MLC has multiple bits per cell, SLC one bit ber cell. Either way thats many thousands of cells per device.

yakumo said,
Just to clarify as this started by a misconception: That is PER CELL, not per device.

the bigger the drive, the better off you are, i guess.... just dont put your page file on the SSD ?

If you can afford an SSD right now, you can easily afford 4Gb+ of RAM. If you NEED an SSD, you'll likely need 8Gb or more of RAM as well. I don't think the pagefile will really matter, just keep it on a mechanical disk to be safe =P

SSD's still suffer from bad life span and degrading quality and speed over time so still not worth it over traditional hard drives and specially not at the price of which a computer can be made for a single component.

Degrading quality and speed is the same issue we have with HDDs.

There are some SSDs with JMicron chips which are flawed. The only good ones are the Intel drives. You only need an SSD drive for your OS partition anyway.