First 802.11ac WiFi products now on sale from Buffalo

If you want to be on the cutting edge of WiFi technology, you can now do so for the price of $179.99. Buffalo Technology has announced today that its AirStation WZR-D1800H WiFi router and the WLI-H4-D1300 wireless media bridge, the first to support the new 802.11ac protocol, are now on sale in select retail outlets.

Both products support the new 802.11ac WiFi protocol, running on the 5 GHz spectrum. Technically, 802.11ac isn't quite official yet; the final standards have not yet been ratified by the IEEE. However, Buffalo claims that its new router product can, in theory anyway, offer transfer speeds up to 1300 Mbps.

Buffalo also says the media bridge device can provide data speeds of up to 1750 Mbps across the 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz bands. It also has four gigabit Ethernet ports for those of you who want to connect to some devices with a wired network connection. Both products have a 2.4 GHz 802.11n radio for data transfer speeds of up to 450 Mbps.

Of course, your PC, laptop, game consoles, smart TVs, wireless phones and more all support the older WiFi protocols. You can still use these new routers, they are fully backward compatible with any WiFi enabled device that has 802.11a, 11b, 11g and 11n support. Just don't expect to see 1300 Mbps in data transfer speeds until the new 802.11ac WiFi protocol is available on more products.

Image via Buffalo

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Why did they go with ac? A single letter wasn't good enough anymore, or does this one also broadcast ac power like something Tesla dreamed up? Can I get a dc version?

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Buffalo claims that its new router product can, in theory anyway, offer transfer speeds up to 1300 Mbps.

We just got to love this

So the 'wifi stopping wallpaper' won't stop this then if it's going back to 5GHz ? (Assuming it only blocks 2.4GHz)

n_K said,
So the 'wifi stopping wallpaper' won't stop this then if it's going back to 5GHz ? (Assuming it only blocks 2.4GHz)

No, the Wi-Fi blocking wall paper blocks 2.4 and 5GHz signals, also 0.9, 1.8 and 2.1 GHz cell signals.

802.11n runs on 5GHz as well, so I'm not surprised to see this there as well. 2.4 GHz is saturated in a lot of places (I have at least 10 other 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signals I have to compete with where I live). 5GHz provides more channels and doesn't get all of the interferance from other 2.4 GHz devices

I still find my G routers to be fine.

I pay for a 20mbps connection and get 20mbps on my 54mbps WiFi.

No use in paying for "what you COULD have speeds"

The only time you'll need 1Gbps WIFI is if you are copying files over the network to your file server. Well I guess that or if you live in Sweden, Japan, Kansas (Google Fiber), Maine or Places where Sonic.net feeds as they also do 1Gbps internet connections.

Sometimes I'd like to copy few movies to my laptop before heading on the road, in those cases I generally have to cable up as trying to do it via my "fast" 450Mbps 5Ghz Wifi-N network just isn't fast enough. I usually get 25MB/s (170-200Mbps) however which is pretty good, at least faster than 100Mbps Ethernet!

ShareShiz said,
I still find my G routers to be fine.

I pay for a 20mbps connection and get 20mbps on my 54mbps WiFi.

No use in paying for "what you COULD have speeds"

This is obviously for people who want fast intranet speeds for, say, transferring large files between computers on the same network... Good luck transferring 10GB worth of data with your 54mbps wifi.

ShareShiz said,
I still find my G routers to be fine.

I pay for a 20mbps connection and get 20mbps on my 54mbps WiFi.

No use in paying for "what you COULD have speeds"

clearly you don't get the concept of transfering files between machines without running cat 5/6 cable, or streaming movies to multiple machines. If all you care about is the internet then why not just stick to G?

ShareShiz said,
I still find my G routers to be fine.

I pay for a 20mbps connection and get 20mbps on my 54mbps WiFi.

No use in paying for "what you COULD have speeds"

Unless you don't live by yourself or are deploying wireless in a company/corporate environment where that 54mbps speed is then 'shared' between a lot of users.

In a G network alone, just a couple of users could saturate the bandwidth and start creating problems.

Home users can 'probably' get away with G, but when you have a couple of family members streaming netflix, youtube, hulu and other content on a few devices, the G level speeds don't even get close to meeting the demand.

Additionally, if you have even a couple of users and one is gaming, like XBox live where 'jitter' and latency are serious issues, the other user on the network can create problems with server response times jumping and creating spikes that the game has trouble compensating.

Most homes should be using a dual N/G router with dual radios, and this shoves the a/n 5ghz clients and the 2.4ghz g clients to their own separate ranges and expands bandwidth, which is an easy way to do load balancing at home.