First Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 updates released

Microsoft has allowed a select groups and businesses to download and use the RTM versions of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 in mid-August. While the rest of us will have to wait until October 26th to get Windows 8, Microsoft has already issued the first minor software update for their next operating system as well as Windows Server 2012.

The small download is just 2.4 MB for the 32-bit version of Windows 8 but goes up to 4.3 MB for the 64-bit version of Windows 8 as well as Windows Server 2012. All of these updates fix the same issue. Microsoft states:

Assume that you add a shortcut to a file to the All Apps view in Windows 8 or in Windows RT. Then, you change the file association of the type of file that you created a shortcut to. In this situation, the tile image in the All Apps view is not updated to reflect the new file association.

According to the patch notes, this update is supposed to be for Windows RT devices as well. However, since there are no Windows RT products available to purchase yet, Microsoft has apparently not made that version of the patch publicly available.

Source: Windows Download Center | Image via Microsoft

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primortal said,

Isn't Flash Adobe's problem not Microsoft?

No, in Windows 8, Flash updates have to come from Microsoft, the ones provided by Adobe won't work.

Also, looking at the headline bellow this, it looks like they'll have one out “soon”. Let's hope.

CentralDogma said,

No, in Windows 8, Flash updates have to come from Microsoft, the ones provided by Adobe won't work.

Also, looking at the headline bellow this, it looks like they'll have one out “soon”. Let's hope.

Though Adobe has to provide Microsoft the patch, correct?

primortal said,

Though Adobe has to provide Microsoft the patch, correct?

Indeed. Microsoft do not fix Adobe's software. They just distribute the patch that is provided to them.

TCLN Ryster said,

Why would Microsoft fix a problem in Adobe's software? Sure Microsoft may bundle it, doesn't make it Microsoft's problem.

That said, it looks like Microsoft have received a fix to distribute, and it'll be coming shortly...

http://www.neowin.net/news/mic...y-fix-for-windows-8-shortly

Because Flash is built in in Windows 8, IE10, just like in Chrome. It will be updated by Microsoft when there are updates.

Edit: Damn, you edited and there were a bunch more replies as I wrote that, haha. Commenters are on the ball today!

primortal said,

Though Adobe has to provide Microsoft the patch, correct?

That's correct. I'm referring to Microsoft distributing the patch. Adobe already has the patch out.

CentralDogma said,

That's correct. I'm referring to Microsoft distributing the patch. Adobe already has the patch out.

You said "fixed" the vulnerability. They aint fixing anything, Adobe are. Windows Update is just the conduit through which the patch flows

primortal said,
Isn't Flash Adobe's problem not Microsoft?

It doesn't really matter whose issue it is. What really matters is whose responsibility it is. And with this approach taken by MS, it becomes responsibility of both Adobe and MS.

I really wish whoever decides on the description of patches in Windows Update would be a little more descriptive. They've all turned into generic "this patch fixes issues in windows" type affairs... well no s**t! Could they be any more vague? Kind of makes the whole point of the description, well, pointless.

TCLN Ryster said,
I really wish whoever decides on the description of patches in Windows Update would be a little more descriptive. They've all turned into generic "this patch fixes issues in windows" type affairs... well no s**t! Could they be any more vague? Kind of makes the whole point of the description, well, pointless.

You should really look at their comments in side the Windows source code, then you will understand why their comments in Windows Update are so dry and non descriptive.

TCLN Ryster said,
I really wish whoever decides on the description of patches in Windows Update would be a little more descriptive. They've all turned into generic "this patch fixes issues in windows" type affairs... well no s**t! Could they be any more vague? Kind of makes the whole point of the description, well, pointless.

Look up the KB article for the patch.

Did anyone catch the misinformation in the KB article?
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2751352
In the Resolution section, where it says "How to obtain this update", in the section where you use a mouse, the first step is "Click the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search."
Umm... my Firefox browser is full-screened at the moment. If I "Click the upper-right corner of the screen", won't it close my browser, and not get me closer to clicking "Search"?

Clarity fail, Microsoft.

PUC_Snakeman said,
Did anyone catch the misinformation in the KB article?
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2751352
In the Resolution section, where it says "How to obtain this update", in the section where you use a mouse, the first step is "Click the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search."
Umm... my Firefox browser is full-screened at the moment. If I "Click the upper-right corner of the screen", won't it close my browser, and not get me closer to clicking "Search"?

Clarity fail, Microsoft.

To be fair, if your running an app full screen (as in full screen mode not just maximised) then its kind of upto you to infer that you'd need to come out of full screen mode. A lot of things don't work the same when your running an app in full screen mode and its always down to you to work that out.

PUC_Snakeman said,
Did anyone catch the misinformation in the KB article?
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2751352
In the Resolution section, where it says "How to obtain this update", in the section where you use a mouse, the first step is "Click the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search."
Umm... my Firefox browser is full-screened at the moment. If I "Click the upper-right corner of the screen", won't it close my browser, and not get me closer to clicking "Search"?

Clarity fail, Microsoft.

My mom's PC is set to updates cause I'm pretty sure she won't go searching for KB articles. If you go to one, you must have at least an idea on the basic navigation of your pc.

I see, and so that makes the invalid instructions somehow excusable how?

grayscale said,

My mom's PC is set to updates cause I'm pretty sure she won't go searching for KB articles. If you go to one, you must have at least an idea on the basic navigation of your pc.

PUC_Snakeman said,
I see, and so that makes the invalid instructions somehow excusable how?

How is that invalid? Most users won't run their desktop browser at full screen. Do you want them to create 'if' statements to cater all the possibilities on how you will not be able to see the charms bar?

There are simple and clear instructions to bring up the charms bar with a mouse, and they do not involve clicking. Microsoft has failed to provide the correct instructions, here, on their very first Windows 8 update. When they copy/paste their instructions many times in the future, I hope they get it right, because lots of people are new to mouse gestures and new to Windows 8.

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