Flipboard previews Windows 8 app in teaser video

At the Build 2013 keynote speech Wednesday morning, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer briefly mentioned a few upcoming apps for Windows 8, including Facebook and Flipboard, though no screenshots or videos were shown. Flipboard has now released a teaser video for its Windows 8 app, however, briefly showcasing what users can expect.

The video, seen above, only lasts eight seconds and shows the app's live tile and general appearance. Flipboard, which is currently available on Android and iOS, allows users to subscribe to media outlets, showing articles with a unique appearance that makes heavy use of associated photography in what the company calls a "magazine-like format."

As with Microsoft's own news app, the Flipboard app will cycle through stories with brief descriptions in its live tile. In the general interface, users will see a list of their subscriptions to media outlets as well as a new and noteworthy section that highlights trending articles and media outlets.

Source: Flipboard (YouTube)

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Nokia unveils Asha 501 handset in dubstep TV advert

Next Story

Microsoft launches Bing Developer Center

7 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Windows 8.1 looks like it might end up being a much better alternative to the iPad in the long run, if they just get more premium apps like Flipboard to develop for them.

Drewidian said,
Windows 8.1 looks like it might end up being a much better alternative to the iPad in the long run, if they just get more premium apps like Flipboard to develop for them.

If what i'm hearing is true there should be a large boost to Windows 8/RT app development since they've added over 4,000 new APIs to it with 8.1. That should give us a improvement in overall apps and how powerful they are. We know they're going to bring PowerPoint over and probably the rest of the core Office apps to though they didn't name those. Once you can get solid versions of Word, PP, Excel, Outlook, etc on WinRT then there's really nothing holding back other developers from porting over modern versions of their desktop Win32 apps.