From The Forums: Reactions to the Windows Blue build leak

Unless you been away from the Internet this morning, you know than an unauthorized leak of the 9364 build of Windows Blue managed to find its way to the Internet. As always, our Neowin forum readers wasted no time in giving their opinions on what's been changed and added compared to Windows 8.

Some forum members have reacted to the extra large Start menu tile for the desktop, with Neowin member GP007 saying, "I wasn't expecting the extra large tile but that's cool specially if they add the ability to have controls inside the tile itself which makes it even more like a widget as well."

Another forum member, theyarecomingforyou, was less impressed by what was revealed, saying, "It's a step in the right direction, but there's nothing substantial enough to win over the critics. I really wish Microsoft would do more to improve the attractiveness of the Start Screen and other Metro elements (user logon, Ctrl-Alt-Del, etc), as currently they're quite unappealing."

SekaiStory, yet another Neowin member, offered up his own misgivings on Windows Blue as revealed in the leaked build, saying:

I'm quite sure it's a really early build and pretty incomplete, but I share the same worries, it's simply not enough. Loving the advanced settings and expanded personalization, but it was clear that was coming. Then again they could issue big updates to all the core apps (and include new default apps) any day now and drastically improve the whole experience even on existing Windows 8 PCs.

TruckWEB presented his thoughts on the same forum thread, saying:

It's still Windows 8 with the slightly better Modern UI. Nothing more. Microsoft should have made the UI more attractive. And (FOR ME) the lack of the start menu is a killer and I don't like using a "fix" to bring a feature back. It's not going to make me upgrade my Win7 PC to this.

Overall, it seems that most Neowin forum members in the message thread like what was revealed in the Windows Blue leaked build, they also feel that Microsoft could do more to add new features and improve the OS compared to Windows 8. Of course, this is a leaked build that will likely only be part of the upcoming release and Microsoft has plenty of time to make changes based on feedback, even from an unauthorized released.

Image via c.wrzuta.pl

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After 2 years of using Windows 8, I've gotten used to being without a Start Menu
Also using a smartphone helps you understand where Windows was headed.
one codebase, multiple devices, same experience
just not sure why windows 8 wasn't released with these 'Blue' features.
and i'm still wondering what happens when the build numbers go past 9999

Well, I don't use a smartphone, nor do I have any interest in owning one. So for me, the Start Screen is a mess to deal with, and something I don't enjoy at all. All of the hardware I work on is non-touchscreen based, so using an OS that's designed for touchscreen systems is a miserable experience. It's one reason why I have Classic Shell on my Windows 8 machine, so that I can WORK comfortably in a consistent environment, without having to flip/flip/flip back and forth to open a program. One click on the Start Orb, and I'm able to start working.

But that's my comfort zone. Your mileage may vary, of course.

Tal Greywolf said,
Well, I don't use a smartphone, nor do I have any interest in owning one. So for me, the Start Screen is a mess to deal with, and something I don't enjoy at all. All of the hardware I work on is non-touchscreen based, so using an OS that's designed for touchscreen systems is a miserable experience. It's one reason why I have Classic Shell on my Windows 8 machine, so that I can WORK comfortably in a consistent environment, without having to flip/flip/flip back and forth to open a program. One click on the Start Orb, and I'm able to start working.

But that's my comfort zone. Your mileage may vary, of course.

Sounds like you're on your way out of the target market then, and that's not just Microsoft, but all major tech companies. Smartphones are a fact of life today, that's what Apple, Google, and Microsoft want you to have. Plus, the trend is mobility. I work with Windows 8 daily on my desktop and mainly on my laptop. To have a consistent UX with those two devices and my smartphone is key. I can take my work with me and have it work across all three devices without the need for me to do anything different.

Dot Matrix said,

Sounds like you're on your way out of the target market then, and that's not just Microsoft, but all major tech companies. Smartphones are a fact of life today, that's what Apple, Google, and Microsoft want you to have. Plus, the trend is mobility. I work with Windows 8 daily on my desktop and mainly on my laptop. To have a consistent UX with those two devices and my smartphone is key. I can take my work with me and have it work across all three devices without the need for me to do anything different.


Well, first off, I don't want a smartphone that duplicates what I have on my computer desktop. I want a *phone*, not a portable Internet Cafe. When I am away from home, I am intentionally away from my computer and do not care to have it toted around with me on my hip. I don't care to read my email, view videos or anything else when I'm out at a restaurant, shopping or driving. Whatever it is can WAIT, which is what most folks fail to understand completely.

Secondly, you can't have a consistent UX if you're using different devices in different fashions. Since I don't like touchscreen (I hate trying to type on my company-issued Blackberry and made sure it had a real keyboard instead), I certainly don't want it on my laptop or my desktop. Nor do I want an OS that was designed for a touchscreen on my laptop or desktop. Two completely different modes of working that should require two different ways of working with it. No, it's not consistent, nor will it ever be. Non-touchscreen devices are not going away, nor should they.

As for mobility, there's a proper time and purpose for mobility, but the systems and tools we're developing are using it more as a "gee whiz!" fashion instead of as a productivity tool. I see mobility as more of a augmentation to the desktop, not as a replacement for the desktop. But the computer, the keyboard, the monitor and mouse is where I do my work, and giving me a tablet or smartphone and telling me I need to be productive with it will meet with failure, as it should. Technology needs to be tailored to the person, not the other way around as it's trying to be done with Microsoft's latest releases.

But that's my viewpoint. You may not share it, which is your right. But don't expect me to suddenly change it simply because the majority is suffering from *SHINY!*

Before saying anything we must remember that this is an FBL (Feature Build Lab) build in which a team works on a specific feature. It doesn't highlight all the development in the OS which is reflected only in winmain build which combines all fbl builds together

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAxXX0m-P_0

What's the music app like? I don't have Windows 8 - and English is my third language, so please bear with me

But in WMP in Windows 7, when you import a cd box set, the tracks play like cd 1 track 1, cd 2 track 1 and so on.

In iTunes it's cd 1 track 1, cd 1 track 2 and so on - which is of course way better. I know I can create playlists, but that's not something I want to do in WMP - I just want to import my music off my cd's and play the music in it's correct order.

Can that be done in the music app in Windows 8 or would I have to install iTunes?

Are you asking about CD ripping or tagging or if ID3 tags import properly with the music? CD ripping/tagging is not possible at this moment in the metro UI. When I imported my music into the Music app on my virtual machine, to my knowledge everything was tagged correctly.

ID3 tags I'm very much guessing - as my computer knowledge doesn't run deep ...or even shallow for that matter But guess then Windows 8 will be a welcomed when I buy my next machine, seeing as in WMP I've always had to write after the names of my cd's "disc 1" and so on.

Tigurinn said,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAxXX0m-P_0

What's the music app like? I don't have Windows 8 - and English is my third language, so please bear with me

But in WMP in Windows 7, when you import a cd box set, the tracks play like cd 1 track 1, cd 2 track 1 and so on.

In iTunes it's cd 1 track 1, cd 1 track 2 and so on - which is of course way better. I know I can create playlists, but that's not something I want to do in WMP - I just want to import my music off my cd's and play the music in it's correct order.

Can that be done in the music app in Windows 8 or would I have to install iTunes?


The music app on Blue is outdated from what's currently working on 8. We're waiting for an update to the app in 8 right now, should be here this week.

Start menu applications doesn't work!Tested Startisback,classic shell,start8.None of this application wont show classic start menu,and wont boot to desktop directly!

CSharp. said,
About time Microsoft put an end to that.

I don't think they specifically targeted it. Its a new build. Memory locations are different,of course its not going to work.Start menu apps are hacks to the OS shell.They modify and inject code in the processes/files. If the code changed,it means its most likely these hacks die until they are modified again.

Dot Matrix said,

Sweet. So we'll have a slimmer install size?


yep, it saves you about 1MB of storage: get cracking!

Alex87 said,
Start menu applications doesn't work!Tested Startisback,classic shell,start8.None of this application wont show classic start menu,and wont boot to desktop directly!
Probably, those apps check for the kernel version 6.2 if it is Windows 8. Now it is Windows NT 6.3, they won't recognize it anymore.

CSharp. said
About time Microsoft put an end to that.
I'm glad that useless pos software doesn't work. There's no need to have it there in the first place.

My reaction was mainly very positive. Very welcome additions, most of them natural extension of what we already have.

What worries me is the lack of Notification Center. That's my biggest complain of the OS so far.
Hopefully a Notification Center solution will be added when both Windows and Windows Phone Blue hits RTM.

It's sad to see how many are still crying buckets over depreciated features. Why does computing need to stay perpetually stuck just because you want a tiny ass menu, that's limited to a small corner of the screen, or stuck to a paradigm, that quite frankly, has been largely abandoned by developers?

The market is pushing for new things, it would be asinine not to evolve to meet that demand.

It's sad to see many that still seem to be stuck in the obsession that it's necessary to change things that work just for the sake of making changes, similarly it's also sad to see people assuming that change is always for the better.

Javik said,
It's sad to see many that still seem to be stuck in the obsession that it's necessary to change things that work just for the sake of making changes, similarly it's also sad to see people assuming that change is always for the better.

Yeah the horse and buggy was awesome! How dare people thing this crazy awe-toe-moe-beel is better. What's wrong with people?

siah1214 said,

Yeah the horse and buggy was awesome! How dare people thing this crazy awe-toe-moe-beel is better. What's wrong with people?

There are clear advantages to a car over a horse and buggy. Honest question: aside from touchscreen devices, what benefits does the Metro interface offer over the classic interface?

Ledgem said,

There are clear advantages to a car over a horse and buggy. Honest question: aside from touchscreen devices, what benefits does the Metro interface offer over the classic interface?

Platform unification for one. A broader market for two. An evolution of the PC for three...

Ledgem said,
what benefits does the Metro interface offer over the classic interface?

Simpler, less complex, looks better, more consistent, sandboxed, easy install/uninstall, app store etc.

Dot Matrix said,
It's sad to see how many are still crying buckets over depreciated features. Why does computing need to stay perpetually stuck just because you want a tiny ass menu, that's limited to a small corner of the screen, or stuck to a paradigm, that quite frankly, has been largely abandoned by developers?

The market is pushing for new things, it would be asinine not to evolve to meet that demand.

How is Windows 7 and earlier versions abandoned by developers? I still see new programs being released that work with even Windows XP.

Windows Nashville said,
Dot Matrix,

The word is "deprecated", not "depreciated".

Now you may go back to apologizing for Microsoft.

Apologizing for what?

xWhiplash said,

How is Windows 7 and earlier versions abandoned by developers? I still see new programs being released that work with even Windows XP.

Where are the new and exciting apps that are driving consumers back to Windows 7 from iOS? Where are the apps that take advantage of the newest Windows 7 APIs? Where is the store so I can easily download these apps?

Dot Matrix said,

Where are the new and exciting apps that are driving consumers back to Windows 7 from iOS?

Where are the Windows 7 class applications driving people to drop PCs for iPads?

Dot Matrix said,

Where are the apps that take advantage of the newest Windows 7 APIs?

You mean like DX11... Have a look: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L...mes_with_DirectX_11_support

Dot Matrix said,
Where is the store so I can easily download these apps?

Why do you need a store?

MFH said,

Where are the Windows 7 class applications driving people to drop PCs for iPads?

Exactly. Where are the Windows 7 applications? Where is the last you saw a consumer or blogger cooing over some desktop app?

MFH said,

No. FAR from it. I'm talking about Windows 7 specific applications that take the time to integrate into the OS, an deliver a UX that would make me want to run Windows 7. Neowin has a small list (http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...ade-with-windows-7-in-mind/) of apps, keyword there being "small". It also hasn't been updated in ages. Oh, well. So much for that.

MFH said,

Why do you need a store?

So that consumers and I don't have to search all over creation, and explore questionable websites to get what we need.

Lost is so much of these discussion is the concept of "business productivity" based on using traditional displays and keyboards with applications written for those form factors. So, the touch-screen UI is the latest "hot setup," what does it have to do with business productivity with existing applications? Little. Consider the huge number of financial institutions and medical facilities that are using XP-based applications.

Exactly. They aren't going to rush out and embrace the changes in Windows 8, nor are a lot of other businesses. In fact, I know already that the company I work for (a major defense contractor) will NOT be deploying Windows 8 except in very small niche requirements. Even with the changes Microsoft is making to the OS, it's not going to be enough to keep companies who have standardized on specific interfaces to consider switching.

Me? I'm on Windows 8, running purely on the Desktop. The Start Screen? Eliminated as best I can, as I find it useless at best, a disaster at worst.

Basically the open minded types like the changes we see coming, the usual closed minded "geeks" are still stuck on hating the unneeded start menu

Psudo-PowerUsers who think they know everything windows and admin their computers with yamicsoft windows 7 manager and registry cleaners.

Theyre Ten-a-penny.

TPreston said,
Psudo-PowerUsers who think they know everything windows and admin their computers with yamicsoft windows 7 manager and registry cleaners.

Theyre Ten-a-penny.


So damn true!

If I took away one of the buttons on your mouse, put it on your keyboard and said "deal with it", would you react with a "oh, that's cool, what i've been doing for the past 15 years has changed, i like change"?

effortless said,
If I took away one of the buttons on your mouse, put it on your keyboard and said "deal with it", would you react with a "oh, that's cool, what i've been doing for the past 15 years has changed, i like change"?

My mouse has six buttons. I probably wouldn't really mind.

But I get what you're saying. It'd be like if some moronic idiot took Steam, crammed it in a tiny, underpowered box, plugged it into a TV, and switched to an interface built for console-style gamepads and said "deal with it".

z0phi3l said
Basically the open minded types like the changes we see coming, the usual closed minded "geeks" are still stuck on hating the unneeded start menu
I consider myself to be an open-minded geek. I for one, am glad that the Start Menu's gone. I've made much more use out of the Start Screen.

effortless said
If I took away one of the buttons on your mouse, put it on your keyboard and said "deal with it", would you react with a "oh, that's cool, what i've been doing for the past 15 years has changed, i like change"?
You're blowing things out of proportion.. Change is not always a bad thing.. Yes, the Start Menu's been around for almost 18 years, but that doesn't mean that it should stay forever. If a better way comes along, go with what's better. Now, your definition of better, might be different than mine (no doubt), but for me, I never really liked the Start Menu for several reasons and I'm glad it's gone.

And users don't simply have to "deal with it". They can download a third-party program that can bring back the Start Menu, if they prefer it.

effortless said,
If I took away one of the buttons on your mouse, put it on your keyboard and said "deal with it", would you react with a "oh, that's cool, what i've been doing for the past 15 years has changed, i like change"?

So, like working on a Mac then?

dtourond said,
You're blowing things out of proportion.. Change is not always a bad thing.. Yes, the Start Menu's been around for almost 18 years, but that doesn't mean that it should stay forever. If a better way comes along, go with what's better. Now, your definition of better, might be different than mine (no doubt), but for me, I never really liked the Start Menu for several reasons and I'm glad it's gone.

And users don't simply have to "deal with it". They can download a third-party program that can bring back the Start Menu, if they prefer it.

When the change hurts productivity, I'd classify it as a bad change. Obviously the experience is different for everybody, but in my case, my workflow was affected pretty drastically. All the little things that take longer all add up. Having a third-party start menu app helped, but when the novelty of apps wore off, Win 7 was more practical. I doubt Win 8 will ever solidly establish itself in the workplace, and there's a pretty good reason for that.

Astra.Xtreme said
When the change hurts productivity, I'd classify it as a bad change.
But how does it hurt productivity? People had to get used to the Start Menu, and they did. People need to get used to the Start Screen. People need to give it a fair chance before saying it's bad.

Astra.Xtreme said
Obviously the experience is different for everybody, but in my case, my workflow was affected pretty drastically.
Then download a third-party program that'll act as the Start Menu. I never liked the Start Menu, so I used programs that re-created the dock.

Astra.Xtreme said
I doubt Win 8 will ever solidly establish itself in the workplace, and there's a pretty good reason for that.
Only time will tell.

dtourond said,
But how does it hurt productivity? People had to get used to the Start Menu, and they did. People need to get used to the Start Screen. People need to give it a fair chance before saying it's bad.

Constantly having to switch back and forth to Metro was a huge waste of time. Clicking a start button and then a recently opened program is much faster. System settings is messy and getting to Windows Update and Shut Down takes way too many steps. I could list many more, but I've already reverted back to 7 and have gotten over it. With 7, I've honestly never thought about how a certain function or action could have been made better. With Win 8, that thought constantly crossed my mind, along with the "why the hell did they do this" feeling. Meh, it just wasn't worth the aggravation. I gave it a good 3-4 months, and that was far enough.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Constantly having to switch back and forth to Metro was a huge waste of time. Clicking a start button and then a recently opened program is much faster.

If you have frequently accessed applications, you can pin these to your task bar for even fewer clicks-to-launch than the start menu.

System settings is messy and getting to Windows Update and Shut Down takes way too many steps.

All of this can be accessed very quickly by right clicking the lower left corner of the screen and getting what is essentially an administrator menu.

I could list many more, but I've already reverted back to 7 and have gotten over it.

This really just sounds like you saw a learning curve and said no.

With 7, I've honestly never thought about how a certain function or action could have been made better.

That's a strange thing to say. There are always opportunities for improvement--nothing is perfect. To say nothing about Windows 7 could be better is practically saying you've stepped off the technology train.

Astra.Xtreme said
Constantly having to switch back and forth to Metro was a huge waste of time.
If you can get things done in the Modern UI, then why would you have to switch back & forth. And it's really not that hard to switch between the two.

Astra.Xtreme said
Clicking a start button and then a recently opened program is much faster.
Or you could pin all of your recently opened programs to the Start Screen. That way, they're all right there for you.

Astra.Xtreme said
Shut Down takes way too many steps
As for the shutdown process, you could do what I did, and make a shortcut that has the shutdown command and pin it to the Start Screen; boom! You got a shutdown button. Or, you could always press the physical power button. I've done that a couple times.

Astra.Xtreme said
I've already reverted back to 7 and have gotten over it. With 7, I've honestly never thought about how a certain function or action could have been made better. With Win 8, that thought constantly crossed my mind, along with the "why the hell did they do this" feeling.
Well, if you prefer something inferior, then have fun.

dtourond said,

As for the shutdown process, you could do what I did, and make a shortcut that has the shutdown command and pin it to the Start Screen; boom! You got a shutdown button. Or, you could always press the physical power button. I've done that a couple times.

Everyone forgets pressing Alt-F4 while the desktop is active. Brings up a *very* legacy shutdown menu. I've started using it whenever I have a keyboard in front of me, which is surprising since I'm pretty averse to relying on keyboard shortcuts.

When my laptop is in tablet mode, using the charms bar to shut down is like...zero effort. I twitch my right thumb a little and done.

Joshie said
Everyone forgets pressing Alt-F4 while the desktop is active. Brings up a *very* legacy shutdown menu. I've started using it whenever I have a keyboard in front of me, which is surprising since I'm pretty averse to relying on keyboard shortcuts.

When my laptop is in tablet mode, using the charms bar to shut down is like...zero effort. I twitch my right thumb a little and done.

Sometimes I'll just press Win+I > power and then shutdown, or I'll just lock it up (Win+L) and choose shutdown there.

I like the menu that appears when you press Alt+F4, but I don't like how you have to be on the Desktop itself. I wish I could just press something like Win+Alt+F4 to activate that same menu, but from anywhere in the OS.

dtourond said,

Well, if you prefer something inferior, then have fun.

That would be your opinion...
Personally, I'm not going to be a sheep for Microsoft and change my workflow because they say I should. I've found absolutely nothing that's faster in 8 than 7. So why should I waste my time adapting over to it, if it won't benefit me at all? The crappy adoption rate proves that I stand with the majority here.

Astra.Xtreme said
I've found absolutely nothing that's faster in 8 than 7.
It's pretty hard to tell when you use it for only 5 seconds.

Astra.Xtreme said
So why should I waste my time adapting over to it, if it won't benefit me at all?
That's right. If you don't care about security, stability, performance and the features, then hey, why use it.

Astra.Xtreme said
The crappy adoption rate proves that I stand with the majority here.
So, you stand with a majority of people who'd rather use inferior.

The adoption rate isn't just because of the users. It's also because Microsoft didn't provide a proper tutorial to really guide users from 7 (and previous versions as well) to 8.

dtourond said,
It's pretty hard to tell when you use it for only 5 seconds.

Perhaps you should read before you comment... I very clearly said that I used it for almost 4 months. I won't bother commenting to the rest of your comment since you probably won't read it anyway...

Astra.Xtreme said
Perhaps you should read before you comment... I very clearly said that I used it for almost 4 months. I won't bother commenting to the rest of your comment since you probably won't read it anyway...
I did. When I said "5 seconds", I was implying that you haven't really tried it enough first.

I could be using an OS for a whole year, but if I don't make an effort to try and understand it, it won't matter how long I've used it.

dtourond said,
I did. When I said "5 seconds", I was implying that you haven't really tried it enough first.

I could be using an OS for a whole year, but if I don't make an effort to try and understand it, it won't matter how long I've used it.

Umm... using it on a daily basis for 4 months is plenty of time to prove I gave it a good effort. I learned all the secrets and "shortcuts", but it wasn't worth it to change my workflow to gain nothing. If it doesn't bother you, then that's great. I stand by my opinion and agree with the millions of bad reviews of it. Maybe when 9 comes out in a couple years, it will be established and cleaned up enough to be worth making the change. Until then, I'll hold off.

Astra.Xtreme said
Umm... using it on a daily basis for 4 months is plenty of time to prove I gave it a good effort. I learned all the secrets and "shortcuts", but it wasn't worth it to change my workflow to gain nothing.
Well, if you think you gained nothing from it, then (imo) I think you haven't used it enough.

Astra.Xtreme said
I stand by my opinion and agree with the millions of bad reviews of it.
Well, even if there's a lot of bad reviews, doesn't mean they're all right about it. I don't understand why people believe that just because a large group of people think the same way, that they're right; it's not always true. At least I know I can make a decision myself and not get brainwashed by these so-called "experts" who review products.

Astra.Xtreme said
Maybe when 9 comes out in a couple years, it will be established and cleaned up enough to be worth making the change. Until then, I'll hold off.
Like I've said to others, have fun using inferior software.

dtourond said,
Well, if you think you gained nothing from it, then (imo) I think you haven't used it enough.

Well, even if there's a lot of bad reviews, doesn't mean they're all right about it. I don't understand why people believe that just because a large group of people think the same way, that they're right; it's not always true. At least I know I can make a decision myself and not get brainwashed by these so-called "experts" who review products.

Like I've said to others, have fun using inferior software.

And that goes both ways... Just because Microsoft says something is better, doesn't mean we should all bow down and take the bait. I've tried it for myself, and I've found very few advantages. The downsides largely outweigh the upsides, in my experience.

You're clearly closed-minded about this, so it's pretty pointless to carry on a discussion with somebody who's convinced they're right in every way. Have fun with your touch interface, and the joke will be on you when MS changes everything up again in Win9...

Astra.Xtreme said
You're clearly closed-minded about this, so it's pretty pointless to carry on a discussion with somebody who's convinced they're right in every way. Have fun with your touch interface, and the joke will be on you when MS changes everything up again in Win9...
Well, it's essentially your loss because you'd rather use inferior software. I'm not closed-minded, I just know a great OS when I see it. And I don't just use Windows, I use Linux and OS X as well, so your claim about me being closed-minded is false in every way.

dtourond said,
Well, it's essentially your loss because you'd rather use inferior software. I'm not closed-minded, I just know a great OS when I see it. And I don't just use Windows, I use Linux and OS X as well, so your claim about me being closed-minded is false in every way.

That's exactly your problem... You think Win7 is inferior to 8, and there's no telling you otherwise. In my experience, it's not. I'm really not sure why that's so difficult for you to understand... So yes, you are close-minded because you are dead-set in your belief that 8 is better than 7... Just because it's newer, doesn't mean it's better.

Astra.Xtreme said
That's exactly your problem... You think Win7 is inferior to 8, and there's no telling you otherwise.
Well, if you did your research, you'd see exactly the difference between Windows 7 & 8. Windows 8 has improved a lot in a few important parts of the OS such as security, performance, stability, boot up times, and also introduced some new features.

Astra.Xtreme said
In my experience, it's not. I'm really not sure why that's so difficult for you to understand...
Well, I prefer to use what's better, and after all the research I did, it came to the conclusion that Windows 8 is indeed because of everything that's been worked on and improved. If you prefer to refuse to even comprehend that's in better in anyway, then stick to your fantasy world. I'll be over here, in reality and using the OS that is better.

Astra.Xtreme said
So yes, you are close-minded because you are dead-set in your belief that 8 is better than 7... Just because it's newer, doesn't mean it's better.
I never said it's better just because it's newer. I said it's better because of all the important things they improved on, and the features they put into 8. That's why it's better. But, if you don't care about things like security, performance, stability, etc. then of course you wouldn't want Windows 8.

dtourond said,
Well, if you did your research, you'd see exactly the difference between Windows 7 & 8. Windows 8 has improved a lot in a few important parts of the OS such as security, performance, stability, boot up times, and also introduced some new features.

Well, I prefer to use what's better, and after all the research I did, it came to the conclusion that Windows 8 is indeed because of everything that's been worked on and improved. If you prefer to refuse to even comprehend that's in better in anyway, then stick to your fantasy world. I'll be over here, in reality and using the OS that is better.

I never said it's better just because it's newer. I said it's better because of all the important things they improved on, and the features they put into 8. That's why it's better. But, if you don't care about things like security, performance, stability, etc. then of course you wouldn't want Windows 8.

I have a SSD, so performance is the same. The start-up "trick" isn't really that impressive since it's basically keeping your PC on stand-by. But again, with an SSD, the improvement from 7 is hardly anything. Security improvements are also minimal. They built-in MSE, which is nice, but I've never used a security app since XP, so I can continue without one just fine. And like I've already said, I don't care for the touch interface and apps. I thought Cocktail Flow was pretty awesome, but as soon as I realized I could get it on my iPhone, I stopped caring.

I never said that Win8 wasn't better in any way, so don't put words in my mouth. I like that they removed Aero and the interface is cleaner looking since they used straight edges exclusively. But cosmetics isn't enough to be worth my time. Functionality wise, I found it inferior and disorganized.

You think I live in a fantasy world... wow...
I've given clear and precise reasons why I don't like 8. You've done nothing but barge in here with your head held high and ramble on with your cocky attitude about how you're right and I, and everybody else with similar views, is wrong. So do go on about that fantasy world...

Astra.Xtreme said
I have a SSD, so performance is the same. The start-up "trick" isn't really that impressive since it's basically keeping your PC on stand-by. But again, with an SSD, the improvement from 7 is hardly anything.
Not everyone has an SSD though, so that does count as an improvement.

Astra.Xtreme said
Security improvements are also minimal. They built-in MSE, which is nice, but I've never used a security app since XP, so I can continue without one just fine.
Again, don't just think of yourself here. Think of people in general, and how this'll affect them.

Astra.Xtreme said
Functionality wise, I found it inferior and disorganized.
Functionality is at par, if not better in Windows 8.

Astra.Xtreme said
You think I live in a fantasy world
Yes, I do.

Astra.Xtreme said
You've done nothing but barge in here with your head held high and ramble on with your cocky attitude about how you're right and I, and everybody else with similar views, is wrong.
That's actually wrong, but okay. All I'm doing is pointing out why some people are wrong, that's all.

Astra.Xtreme said
So do go on about that fantasy world...
I think you live in a fantasy world because you've refused to see the improvements and features in Windows 8 make it better than Windows 7. If you prefer to use 7, then great. But don't say it's better because aside from your personal opinions, you're wrong.

dtourond said,
Not everyone has an SSD though, so that does count as an improvement.

Again, don't just think of yourself here. Think of people in general, and how this'll affect them.

Functionality is at par, if not better in Windows 8.

Yes, I do.

That's actually wrong, but okay. All I'm doing is pointing out why some people are wrong, that's all.

I think you live in a fantasy world because you've refused to see the improvements and features in Windows 8 make it better than Windows 7. If you prefer to use 7, then great. But don't say it's better because aside from your personal opinions, you're wrong.

Once again, you're putting words in my mouth... I've repeatedly said that 8 was inferior, in my experience. Why do I care about how it works for anybody else? I'm not a sheep, and I'll use what works best for me. I haven't been saying 7 is better than 8 for everybody. It's you that's been saying the inverse and criticizing me for it, hence why you're the one that's wrong here. 8 isn't better than 7 for everybody, and why you can't grasp that concept is beyond me.

If 8 is so amazing and has that huge of benefits, then why aren't people adopting over to it? Hmm... maybe because those benefits aren't as substantial as you make them sound. Or maybe the whole idea of a desktop UI designed for touchscreen is a crappy idea. It looks to me that a lot of people certainly think so. You clearly think 8 is wonderful. That's great and there's no reason for me to say otherwise. But for you to criticize me for not having your mindset, makes you look like an immature and ignorant troll.

Astra.Xtreme said
Once again, you're putting words in my mouth...
How?

Astra.Xtreme said
Why do I care about how it works for anybody else?
Because it shows you that maybe it's not as bad as you think.

Astra.Xtreme said
8 isn't better than 7 for everybody, and why you can't grasp that concept is beyond me.
Well unless anyone can bring up a valid reason as to why something that is better isn't better for everyone.

Astra.Xtreme said
If 8 is so amazing and has that huge of benefits, then why aren't people adopting over to it?
Because people are too damn afraid of change and they figure that any sort of change is bad, when really it's not. People complained when they released Windows 95, and people got over it. It's not about Windows, or Microsoft in general. It's about people not wanting change.

I suggest you read this article: http://www.techzone360.com/top...ws-blue-ui-change-hurts.htm

Astra.Xtreme said
It looks to me that a lot of people certainly think so.
A group of people can be wrong though, just remember that.

Astra.Xtreme said
You clearly think 8 is wonderful.
That's right. That's because I've seen how great it works and I've done my research and after all the improvements and features, it's proven that it indeed is better. Maybe you don't care about the importance of a computer. You know, things like security, performance, etc. Then I can see why you don't care about Windows 8, but for the people who do, I can see how Windows 8 would help them.

dtourond said,
How?

Because it shows you that maybe it's not as bad as you think.

Well unless anyone can bring up a valid reason as to why something that is better isn't better for everyone.

Because people are too damn afraid of change and they figure that any sort of change is bad, when really it's not. People complained when they released Windows 95, and people got over it. It's not about Windows, or Microsoft in general. It's about people not wanting change.

I suggest you read this article: http://www.techzone360.com/top...ws-blue-ui-change-hurts.htm

A group of people can be wrong though, just remember that.

That's right. That's because I've seen how great it works and I've done my research and after all the improvements and features, it's proven that it indeed is better. Maybe you don't care about the importance of a computer. You know, things like security, performance, etc. Then I can see why you don't care about Windows 8, but for the people who do, I can see how Windows 8 would help them.

You really need to re-read what I've already said...
I've listed clear reasons why I don't care for 8. In terms of performance, I've already said 8 is the same as 7 because I have a SSD. You keep spewing that 8 is so much better in terms of performance, but completely ignore that for people with SSDs, that "performance" gain is invisible. I've already detailed my thoughts based on security, so once again, re-read what I've already said... So if performance is the same, security isn't my concern, and I don't like the UI, then please tell me why I should favor 8 over 7? You've yet to give me any legitimate answers... I'll ask you again, why does 8 have such a poor adoption rate if it's so superior? And no, people aren't afraid of change, so that's not a valid excuse.

A small group of people can be wrong too...
FYI, Win 95 was very very well received when it came out. Stores were packed with lines of people out the doors waiting to get it. 95 was a huge upgrade from 3.1 across the board. The changes were drastic, but for huge productivity advantages. You can't say the same thing about Win 7 to 8. Perhaps review the history on it... Yes, some people complained, but there will always be people that complain about anything. Win 8 has had a huge uproar with people showing their disapproval. There has never been a Microsoft product that's had such a huge negative reaction, except maybe ME. The reviews, sales, and numbers all prove it. Nobody is being forced to agree with the reviews, but in my case, I do.

Edited by Astra.Xtreme, Mar 29 2013, 8:37pm :