From the Forums: Windows 8 Experience (How do you like it?)

Two weeks ago, on the day Windows 8 was made available for MSDN and TechNet subscribers, we asked our members about their transition experience.

You can view the results thus far below:

Out of the 329 cast votes, the result is pretty much a positive one with a split appearing in the features section of the poll, with next to no compatibility issues.

If you are registered here on Neowin, and haven't yet voted why not add your experience as well? The topic is inspired from the Windows 7 install experience (2370 votes) which you can view here.

Thanks to everyone that took part in the thread!

From the Forums: Windows 8 Experience (How do you like it?)

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This morning I walked into my den/office at home and last night I had rebooted back into Windows 7.

As I sat reading and drinking coffee, I kept having moments of realization of how 'flat' and 'stagnate' the Windows 7 desktop actually is in comparison to Windows 8.

I normally just walk up to the PC in the morning, and instantly see how much email I have, tweets I'm watching, the Weather, things on my Calendar, headlines of the night/morning. Then I proceed to read and have coffee/energy drink.

With Windows 7, I had to click on my 'daily' folder of Favorites and have it open them all in IE, and then flip through each tab to see the same information Windows 8 gave me at a glance any time I walk by.

So after reading for a bit, I hit reboot to Windows 8, since I wanted to game later, and the extra 20% increase in FPS is nice.

I truly was tired of looking at Win7's static screen. Even using gadgets or a desktop full of active desktop web content doesn't compare to amount of information Windows 8 can display on Live Tiles and how easily your mind just grabs the information at a glance.


Kernel and OS level features that increase performance 'were' my favorite things about Windows 8, but after this morning and looking at a lifeless Win7 desktop with a scattering of Icons, it really is the Start Screen and the information it provides that is truly my favorite feature.

It is like WP7, it seems and looks simplistic in pictures, but when you really use it, you notice how animated and fluid it is, and how it conveys information so easily. The same is true of Windows 8, it looks boring in images, but when it is a screen in the room with you, it is the non-boring screen, animated and full of live information, and Windows 7 desktop in comparison is lifeless and boring.

Windows 8 for PC users = the return of Desktop Icons and Keyboard Shortcuts.

It's ok. It's fast and the desktop theme isn't bad (reminds me of whistler).

But Metro just does not work well with a mouse and keyboard. Its a phone OS layered on top of your desktop, and you are forced into it every time you want to open a program. It yanks you out of your work and puts you into a full screen square fairyland of distractions. Some programs also force you to pin or make desktop shortcuts (like Chrome) because setting them as your default then causes it to open in Metro.

I have been using it for a few weeks and as much as I try to like it, I really don't that much. Dare I say it, it's actually helped me make a decision about purchasing a Mac because if this really is where Windows is going from now on, I don't think I want to follow.

Saying that, I would gladly try a Windows Phone 8, or Windows 8 based tablet.

It is very distracting. I agree with you 100%. I had been waiting for a while to build a hackintosh and Win8 was the push I needed. I'm typing this on my CustomMac and I'm so glad I did it. (I have a Macbook Pro but this CustomMac is way faster!)

JessJess said,
Windows 8 for PC users = the return of Desktop Icons and Keyboard Shortcuts.

It's ok. It's fast and the desktop theme isn't bad (reminds me of whistler).

But Metro just does not work well with a mouse and keyboard. Its a phone OS layered on top of your desktop, and you are forced into it every time you want to open a program. It yanks you out of your work and puts you into a full screen square fairyland of distractions. Some programs also force you to pin or make desktop shortcuts (like Chrome) because setting them as your default then causes it to open in Metro.

I have been using it for a few weeks and as much as I try to like it, I really don't that much. Dare I say it, it's actually helped me make a decision about purchasing a Mac because if this really is where Windows is going from now on, I don't think I want to follow.

Saying that, I would gladly try a Windows Phone 8, or Windows 8 based tablet.

Another one...

So a UI that is based on textual and Graphic interfaces from the 1970s aka OS X is the 'future' for you?

The Menu Bar in OS X that really is NOT a graphical UI concept, but a textual one that is lists of words to memorize, and is a long way from the future of computing. Even iOS is just rows of static icons, again stuff we saw in the 1970s.

Technically, Windows 7/8 are a generation ahead of OS X, and that is a full 10-15 years of a technological difference. OS X is just starting to get to where NT was in 1999, and maybe in 10 years will be competitive at video/graphics/gaming and have a GPU scheduler.

If regression is your idea of the future, go buy a Mac...

thenetavenger said,

Another one...

My thoughts exactly. If you have a comment to make, kindly do it without being an arse hole. Then I might read it.

i cant go back to 7 either, whilst i admit im on the desktop 90% of them time anyways i didnt really use the start menu b4 and using the modern ui is so far much better. have had fun learnign the new things u can do with the charm bar etc etc =]

It all comes down how and for what you use your computer. In some areas Windows-8 will be a better choice, while in others Windows-7 will remain the better choice. Windows-8 is hardly a slam-dunk and shouldn't be thought of in that way.

Problems faced mainly that make me changed back is the stupid Nvidia drivers for Nvidia hybrid graphics G105M is terrible for me. Bsod at times for no reason.

Sadly had to back to Windows 7 last night after a week of BSOD's in 8 (DPC Watchdog Violation). Presumably it's a drivers issue. Very surprised how old Windows 7 felt in comparison, certainly felt a lot slower.

It broke my multi-monitor support that worked fine under Windows 7, with Windows 7 it just worked out of the box, with Windows 8 I couldn't get it to work with the latest drivers or playing with the settings

I love Windows 8, I don't think I can go back to desktop environment (even on non-touch devices). What I like the most about Windows 8 is how the startscreen is a mix of the startbutton, taskbar and the desktop. You can access it at any time and it makes switching between apps so much better.

Windows 7 offered a great improvement when they made the 'show desktop' button quickly available in the lower right corner. Before Windows 7 I never used the desktop because accessing applications from it took too long. Now with Windows 8 it is even better and I've build up a nice selection of pinned tiles.

I also love many other features such as the universal search and the way it allows you to continue the same search through the apps. Except for the name itself the 'charms' are a really good feature. Having settings in once place for all applications was one of those thigns that made Android 2.2 look so much smarter then Windows. Windows finally has that as well as many other smart features, like the devices charm.

But while I love Windows 8 I can also see how others might not love it. If you still work from the desktop then Windows 8 makes things only confusing. Because from that point of view it is strange to have an addition 'desktop' with pinned tiles. And it is annoying that 'modern apps' can't be accessed from the desktop. The way I see it Windows 8 doesn't have two modes, there is only the new startscreen and the desktop is just there to run 'old applications'. If you view it like that (with an openmind) then the benefits of Windows 8 become apparant.

Ronnet said,
I love Windows 8, I don't think I can go back to desktop environment (even on non-touch devices). What I like the most about Windows 8 is how the startscreen is a mix of the startbutton, taskbar and the desktop. You can access it at any time and it makes switching between apps so much better.

Windows 7 offered a great improvement when they made the 'show desktop' button quickly available in the lower right corner. Before Windows 7 I never used the desktop because accessing applications from it took too long. Now with Windows 8 it is even better and I've build up a nice selection of pinned tiles.

I also love many other features such as the universal search and the way it allows you to continue the same search through the apps. Except for the name itself the 'charms' are a really good feature. Having settings in once place for all applications was one of those thigns that made Android 2.2 look so much smarter then Windows. Windows finally has that as well as many other smart features, like the devices charm.

But while I love Windows 8 I can also see how others might not love it. If you still work from the desktop then Windows 8 makes things only confusing. Because from that point of view it is strange to have an addition 'desktop' with pinned tiles. And it is annoying that 'modern apps' can't be accessed from the desktop. The way I see it Windows 8 doesn't have two modes, there is only the new startscreen and the desktop is just there to run 'old applications'. If you view it like that (with an openmind) then the benefits of Windows 8 become apparant.

I too really like Windows 8 which I have on my Asus Ultrabook ... the extra performance is very welcome. I still have Windows 7 on my Desktop and it really feels a bit old and tired. As soon as the upgrades are available I will have Windows 8 on both.

I mostly use the Desktop, but I really can't see a problem ... I think Win 8 is a better desktop operating system than Win 7. Faster, and with an open mind easier to use. My favourite feature is how you just open the start screen and type what you want to find ... much easier to find little used programs or settings than the start button.

I'll be honest and say I really can't see why people complain about the desktop in Windows 8 ... once you take a lttle time to learn how you want to do things (there are lots of different ways to do anything) it's not rocket surgery ... if you can't master the desktop in Win 8 in a few days I don't think you are trying. I'm not going back ... that's for sure.

On top of all this I think the "metro" start screen has a lot of potential with its live tiles. It is really different to anything else, but with purpose. Widows 8 will be a distaster if you belive some of the pundits, but I think if you let people try it and make up their own minds I think it could be a great success. I am reminded of an old saying ... "If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got." Time for a change if you ask me.

I actually went back to Windows 7 yesterday because AMD won't support my graphic card (Mobility Radeon HD 4500) on Windows 8.

Ishanx said,
I actually went back to Windows 7 yesterday because AMD won't support my graphic card (Mobility Radeon HD 4500) on Windows 8.

If I know right, they'll release legacy catalyst in every quarter year. So I think they will release a win8 driver for that (and for other HD 4XXX series).

Ishanx said,
I actually went back to Windows 7 yesterday because AMD won't support my graphic card (Mobility Radeon HD 4500) on Windows 8.

i've got mobility 4650, works perfectly well with the windows drivers... no catalyst but i can live without it pretty well

morden said,

i've got mobility 4650, works perfectly well with the windows drivers... no catalyst but i can live without it pretty well

yeah, I know that but I need those AMD drivers to play a little

Ishanx said,
I actually went back to Windows 7 yesterday because AMD won't support my graphic card (Mobility Radeon HD 4500) on Windows 8.

You do realize you can just install the Windows 7 drivers, they are WDM 1.1, aka Legacy drivers...

We have several Radeon 4650 laptops here with 1gb of VRAM, as they were used for game testing and development.

They run Windows 8 just fine, and yes they run every game we threw at them.

Their driver version stops at 12.6, so these are the latest that will be available. Since there are no new features that will ever benefit the 4xxx GPUs, they won't keep a unified driver for them any more. Hence the 'legacy' driver issue and AMD dumping the drivers and support over to the supplied Microsoft drivers.

The only suggestion I would have is if you are using a Laptop get the latest drivers, even though AMD won't publish them directly, as they expect Toshiba, HP, etc to re-provide the drivers.

The links for laptop owners are:

32bit
http://www2.ati.com/drivers/mo...ty_vista_win7_32_dd_ccc.exe

64bit
http://www2.ati.com/drivers/mo...ty_vista_win7_64_dd_ccc.exe

If you have issues, you can also install the 12.6 drivers, and then select the video card in the Device Manager and rollback the driver to the previous version. This will keep the Catalyst and other features enabled, and use the Microsoft provided driver.


Good luck...

shadodemon said,
So 1 step in windows 7 to get something done is considered old to 3 steps in Winodws 8 is considered new and evolution?

If its 1 step in win7 it is 1 step in win8 as well , coz win8 in desktop mode is basically win7 minus start menu. If u cant work without start menu , u don't know features like pin to taskbar, pin to list, toolbar, include to library etc , in that case u are not a advance user and should stick to the start screen to check ur email and access ur social networks .

shadodemon said,
So 1 step in windows 7 to get something done is considered old to 3 steps in Winodws 8 is considered new and evolution?
3 step task in Windows 7 = 15 step task in Windows 8. Evolution at its best, or maybe not.

Debamit Dutta said,

If its 1 step in win7 it is 1 step in win8 as well , coz win8 in desktop mode is basically win7 minus start menu. If u cant work without start menu , u don't know features like pin to taskbar, pin to list, toolbar, include to library etc , in that case u are not a advance user and should stick to the start screen to check ur email and access ur social networks .


So for those of us who do not use (and dislike) the pin function, we're to clutter up the taskbar with all the icons we could have had centrally located in a start menu? Definitely sounds like a step backwards to me...

shadodemon said,
So 1 step in windows 7 to get something done is considered old to 3 steps in Winodws 8 is considered new and evolution?

Curious... Name one thing that takes any more steps.

The only 'serious' thing I can come up with, is that you need to click or hit arrow key when searching to flip between Apps/Settings/Files (or click on them).

However, with WinKey+W, WinKey+F these are still just one step, and if you just hit the WinKey, it is two steps at most, which on Windows 7 would sometimes be two steps as well if the results list didn't fit in the tiny Start Menu.

So give us a list of your top 20 or 50 things that take 3 steps in Windows 8 that only took 1 step in Windows 7. I will be shocked if you can come up with 5 real things.

I can see why some people may have issues, but I like it and although not perfect by any standards, it's a the natural evolution of Windows in the current tablet/PC climate.
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

yeoo_andy_ni said,
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

While only a 50/50 chance of fixing things it's still a viable tool to fix problems sometimes. The fact that people like you don't know about these things shows you don't know what you're missing and THAT is the only "justification" Microsoft has to destroy Windows.

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

Start>Right-click Computer>Properties>Advanced system settings>System protection

Welcome to the control centre of system restore in windows 7!
Have a nice day.

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

While only a 50/50 chance of fixing things it's still a viable tool to fix problems sometimes. The fact that people like you don't know about these things shows you don't know what you're missing and THAT is the only "justification" Microsoft has to destroy Windows.

goto where ur start menu was right click systems>settings>system protection>sytem restore.>create/restore. to create a restore point or to restore ur system.

Same thing can be done thru control panel in win7 (as well as win8)

There is a reason its called release preview and not final build !!

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

While only a 50/50 chance of fixing things it's still a viable tool to fix problems sometimes. The fact that people like you don't know about these things shows you don't know what you're missing and THAT is the only "justification" Microsoft has to destroy Windows.


Okay, first of all, you don't know me. So You can't bundle me in with the "people like you" quote.
Secondly, I work in IT, I am MS certified and I'm currently studying for Server 2012 and Windows 8 exams. So saying I don't know what I'm missing is again pointing back to my first point. You don't know me.

While saying I expect MS to fix bugs and inconsistencies is a normal reaction. And while it's only my opinion, I am sure there are hundreds, thousands, maybe even millions of people that share that opinion. So while I don't know you, or them, I am sure that my opinion is shared by others in the same situation or position as me. Just not you.

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?


and does an average Joe be interested on System Restore? No. They'll just leech IT support from their IT friends. It will be dumb if it's an IT guy who can't find System Restore (or to at least use Search when he can't find it by mouse).

Debamit Dutta said,

There is a reason its called release preview and not final build !!

It's the final build already.

yeoo_andy_ni said,
I can see why some people may have issues, but I like it and although not perfect by any standards, it's a the natural evolution of Windows in the current tablet/PC climate.
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

Press windows key, type sytem restore, click settings and there, a direct option to create a restore point.

yeoo_andy_ni said,
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

You're basing that on past experiences where service packs fixed Windows UI inconsistencies? Except that never really happened of course…

yeoo_andy_ni said,
I can see why some people may have issues, but I like it and although not perfect by any standards, it's a the natural evolution of Windows in the current tablet/PC climate.
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

I agree that it is an evolution as far as Windows in the tablet climate, but it feels like a devolution in the PC environment. There are benefits to the OS, I won't deny that, but for someone like myself who has worked for years and years on Microsoft OSes with a standardized interface, this is far too radical a change both for me and for others. And while I'm sure there'll be third party products to give you a more standardized interface, it's Microsoft that needs to address this and decide once and for all if they want to produce just a Tablet OS or a PC OS. The two environments are completely different in my view, and trying to shoehorn an OS to work in both really is going to make it less than exceptional on both.

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

While only a 50/50 chance of fixing things it's still a viable tool to fix problems sometimes. The fact that people like you don't know about these things shows you don't know what you're missing and THAT is the only "justification" Microsoft has to destroy Windows.

You mean this thing? Yeah, I'm pretty sure both Windows 8 and Windows 7 have it.

http://u.xrax.me/H_L1QY.png

yeoo_andy_ni said,
I can see why some people may have issues, but I like it and although not perfect by any standards, it's a the natural evolution of Windows in the current tablet/PC climate.
Plus I am sure Windows Updates and SPs will fix any bug ans inconsistencies with the OS and UI respectively.

We can only hope that SP-1 will be coming out very shortly...and provide a mechanism return to the Windows-7 style of UI, especially for those of us without "touch" capability and prefer the "Classic" UI (even though some feel it is outdated.)

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

When I read your post I had no idea whether / where system restore was in Windows 8, so I thought I'd look and see. I just did a Settings search for "restore" and there it was. So the answer to "how long does it take to find" is "about five seconds".

JAB Creations said,

People said that since Vista. Try MAKING a system restore point with Windows 7...oh wait you can't. Is system restore even in Windows 8? How many hours will it take you to find it?

While only a 50/50 chance of fixing things it's still a viable tool to fix problems sometimes. The fact that people like you don't know about these things shows you don't know what you're missing and THAT is the only "justification" Microsoft has to destroy Windows.

It is comments like these that make me spit my coffee out...

In Windows 7, Hit WinKey type restore
**It brings up several ways to get there; however, one should stand out: Create a Restore Point

Windows 8 - it gets tricky, cause ya need a brain cell to search settings.
In Windows 8, Hit WinKey+W type restore
or
Hit WinKey type restore (hit down arrow to settings, press enter)

Again, "Create a Restore Point" should be pretty clear to MOST people.

----
See why I spit my coffee?

What in the HECK is wrong with people, that they can't type in a word to search for something? If you CANNOT FIND SOMETHING YOU SEARCH FOR IT. This is true in the real world, the internet, and you would also think your computer?

Since Windows 95, searching for content like this has been second nature, and Vista/7 have an elaborate SQL-like database managing all your programs, settings, and documents, so why do people not use it?

Is typing the word 'restore' or spelling it write, that hard? Really?

thenetavenger said,

See why I spit my coffee?

Is typing the word 'restore' or spelling it write, that hard? Really?

The worst is that these claim being Microsoft certified...