Fujitsu ARROWS Tab Windows 8 tablets still can't run Windows 8.1 preview

When Microsoft launched the Windows 8.1 preview version out in the wild in late June, the company put out a warning that many Windows 8 PCs that had Intel's latest 32-bit Atom processors inside could not run the preview build, thanks to an issue with their graphics drivers.

The list of PCs covered by this warning was quite extensive, but earlier this month, Microsoft updated its blog post with some good news: "New drivers are now available for most tablets and PCs running Intel’s newer 32-bit Atom processors and now can install the Windows 8.1 Preview." 

Those PCs include the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2, the ASUS VivoTab TF810C, the HP Envy X2, the HP ElitePad 900, and the Samsung ATIV Smart PC. If you own one or more of these products, you can now download some new graphics drivers that should allow you to run the Windows 8.1 preview version.

That's the good news. The bad news is that there is one small holdout. Microsoft states, "Please note that the Fujitsu ARROWS Tab series of tablets are still blocked at this time and we continue to work closely with our partners to resolve this issue." That likely includes the recently released Fujitsu ARROWS Tab Q582/F, which the company claims can "function normally after being immersed in room-temperature tap water to a depth of 1.5 meters for 30 minutes." However, it apparently can't handle a simple OS preview download, at least not yet.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Fujitsu

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14 Comments

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I am not sure why this is even a problem that needs to be published under news? After all, we're talking about a Preview of an operating system to come, not a final and stable commercial release. I am pretty sure that MS and Intel will iron this out until W8.1 hits the shelves.

Yes, sounds like an individual OEM's problem rather than some inherent problem with Windows 8 as some would have us believe.

COKid said,
Dear Microsoft: Thank you for Windows 8. It was all I needed to make the jump to Linux.

I love W8, dislike Linux, and am glad to hear it. Consumer computing is changing/moving, leaving prosumers/enthusiasts and professionals with the desktop and laptop market. The more people that go to Linux or OSX? The better. I'd like to see some something competition in the OS market. Imagine if every OEM PC let you choose from Windows and/or Linux? And companies like Adobe announced native versions of their applications?

I think it'd be great, so thanks for your part in helping that dream along

COKid said,
Dear Microsoft: Thank you for Windows 8. It was all I needed to make the jump to Linux.
Good to know you made the switch but what makes you believe that Microsoft is coming here to read your troll comment? Your life must be pretty boring if you take the time to post nonsense like this on an article you're clearly not interested in.

This isn't looking good. Why is this a challenge at all? Windows releases prior to 8 didn't have this much trouble upgrading to a newer Windows version (albeit the OEM utilities may not work, but the OS itself would generally be loaded just fine).

This makes me concerned about the upgrade path for these devices. Windows Phone devices have had a very checkered history update wise. Especially when OEMs jump off the ship like Dell did, for instance. Will users be limited to upgrades only with the blessing of the OEM?

Windows is getting very deep into the computing as an appliance weeds...

LogicalApex said,
This isn't looking good. Why is this a challenge at all? Windows releases prior to 8 didn't have this much trouble upgrading to a newer Windows version (albeit the OEM utilities may not work, but the OS itself would generally be loaded just fine).

This makes me concerned about the upgrade path for these devices. Windows Phone devices have had a very checkered history update wise. Especially when OEMs jump off the ship like Dell did, for instance. Will users be limited to upgrades only with the blessing of the OEM?

Windows is getting very deep into the computing as an appliance weeds...

Lots of these devices that can't upgrade can run fine if you do a clean install though that's probably not what you want anyways. I think intel dropped the ball somewhere, it seems to be a issue with their IGP in the Atom, and I don't know why it's taking so long for them to fix/update.

Yeah, but that's what seems so off to me. Previously, we could still put the OS on there and deal with the regressions ourselves. Either forcing the old driver on or dealing with the glitches, etc., but in this case we can't do that.

Which makes me wonder how these devices will fare over the longer term. Will they not get Windows 9 due to lack of OEM interest in upgrading them, for instance. It is an area we're not used to with Desktop (or "Real", whatever way you want to refer to it) Windows. In many ways it runs counter to some of the benefits of having full Windows at our disposal.

Us in the IT space have been running Windows versions unsupported by the OEM for a long time on our devices. If we're able to be summarily blocked by MS or the OEM (or both) then we're looking at computing as an appliance and I'm not a big fan of that.

Of course, this is all conjecture at this point as I can't see the future, but the same thing happened with Windows Phone updates and it didn't end well for us consumers there as OEMs just stopped bothering in the update arena.

LogicalApex said,
This isn't looking good. Why is this a challenge at all? Windows releases prior to 8 didn't have this much trouble upgrading to a newer Windows version (albeit the OEM utilities may not work, but the OS itself would generally be loaded just fine).

This makes me concerned about the upgrade path for these devices. Windows Phone devices have had a very checkered history update wise. Especially when OEMs jump off the ship like Dell did, for instance. Will users be limited to upgrades only with the blessing of the OEM?

Windows is getting very deep into the computing as an appliance weeds...

I'm going to overlook the obvious answer, that this is talking about a 'preview release' aka beta release.

Windows 8.0 to 8.1 includes several changes to the WDDM/WDM model and is a fairly major revision as it incorporates technologies back from the Xbox One team to keep parity with the Xbox One in how video RAM is handled that is necessary for the new changes in DX11.2.

The entire UI of Windows 8.1 is affected by these changes as the vector composer and the DWM depend on both the DirectX technologies and the GPU scheduling features of the kernel.

More importantly, these changes also require a significant amount of driver level changes for any GPU that supports the new WDM 1.3, as well changes for older GPUs that are feature locked and using WDM 1.0,1.1,1.2 drivers.

The changes also offer a significant bump in graphics performance overall and in existing games as well depending which DirectX features they are using. (i.e. how they implement their UI overlay, how they interact with the DWM, etc.)

(These changes are significant enough that the WDDM in Windows 7 cannot handle these set of new technologies as it would require upgrading the Windows 7 NT kernel to the Windows 8.1 kernel and implementing the WDDM/WDM 1.3 video system.)

the company claims can "function normally after being immersed in room-temperature tap water to a depth of 1.5 meters for 30 minutes." However, it apparently can't handle a simple OS preview download
Really? Nice try.

LaP said,
I did not even know Fujitsu was making Windows 8 tablets.

Fujitsu has been making Windows tablets since XP Tablet Edition. They're one of Microsoft's most loyal OEMs.