Fujitsu plans to boost HDD capacity by 500% in two years

Fujitsu is always talking up this or that hard drive technology that's totally going to revolutionize the industry and so on, but at least this time around they've got some "solid" numbers.

Based on "areal density" technology, with Fujitsu claiming that a new vertical magnetic recording tech based on crystalline magnesium oxide allows them to sense even smaller magnetic pits, thereby allowing them to squeeze more data into each square inch. Fujitsu was promising 1TB per square inch a few months back, but it seems now they'll settle for 500-800GB per square inch -- which translates to a roughly 500 percent capacity increase -- and should be shipping samples out in a couple years.

Start planning now how to best fill a 5TB drive.

News source: engadget

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Latest technologies works in a special cycle, where they spend many years testing and inproving the technology previous any public release. For example currently Intel and AMD are building and testing the 2010's cpu.


You must be young. :)
Anyone remember when having a 20 MB hard drive was bad ass? ;)

Back then, 1 GB was an unconceivable amount of space.

And now people post "Start planning now how to best fill a 5TB drive", like it would be something special in the all to near future...

"Fujitsu plans to boost HDD capacity by 500% in two years"

That should be:

"Fujitsu plans to boost HDD capacity to 500% in two years"

If Fujitsu was to increase hard drive capacity by 500% in two years, two years from now, we would be seeing 6TB hard drives instead of 5TB hard drives. When you increase something by something, you already have the 100% there, so you subtract that from the percentage to which it is increased to get the percentage by which it is increased.

The former makes more sense. The latter conveys the idea that 500% is going to be the limit and there wont be any increase in capacity.

By - shows there is going to be progression.

Should-have said,
The former makes more sense. The latter conveys the idea that 500% is going to be the limit and there wont be any increase in capacity.

By - shows there is going to be progression.

The former says that the increase will be 500%, meaning 5TB will be added to the existing 1TB top capacity of hard drives today. The latter says that in two years, the capacity will be made 500%. Saying that "to 500%" does imply that there will be no further increases and the "in two years" implies that the "to 500%" means that there will be no further increases in that timespan beyond what was stated, saying nothing about what will happen afterward.

As for implying progression, only verbs can imply progression as a result of the conjugation, prepositions are neutral in this respect. Namely, only the imperfect, present progressive and future progressive tenses imply progression, nothing else does.

You can't increase or decrease by anything over 100%

100% is the max.

I think personally a 60gb is maximum for a hard drive externally, then plug in a few usb hd's for your downloads, pron, movies, backups etc.

Thats what I like to do.

You can't increase or decrease by anything over 100%

Wha?

5 TB is 5 times as much as 1 TB, so it's 500% of 1 TB.
That means you either:
-Increase it by 400% (1 TB +400%*1 TB)
-Multiply it by 500% (1 TB*500% = 5 TB)

Did you mean internally or externally? It is very rare to see anything under 80GB being sold these days. 60Gb could be filled in a matter of hours.

Mathiasdm said,

Wha?

5 TB is 5 times as much as 1 TB, so it's 500% of 1 TB.
That means you either:
-Increase it by 400% (1 TB +400%*1 TB)
-Multiply it by 500% (1 TB*500% = 5 TB)

You cannot actually multiply percentages by numbers to get terabytes that way (as percentages are units). To convert percentages into a unitless number that can be multiplied, you need to multiply it by 1/(100%), then you can multiply by the result to get your desired result.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percent#Perce...se_and_decrease

Due to inconsistent usage, it is not always clear from the context what a percentage is relative to. When speaking of a "10% rise" or a "10% fall" in a quantity, the usual interpretation is that this is relative to the initial value of that quantity. For example, if an item is initially priced at $200 and the price rises 10% (an increase of $20), the new price will be $220. Note that this final price is 110% of the initial price (100% + 10% = 110%).

5TB mh?
i could have use for that...
than again id prolly just go get 2 2TB drives and put em into RAID-1...
so much data needs serious safety from headcrashes, wrong sectors, ...

Glassed Silver:mac

terabyte is too modern day as gigabyte was to 1996(?)

everyones gonna go "OMG I WILL NEVER FILL THAT", then after a while it wont be enough o_O

:idle pondering:

A good-quality video can be done at about 8Mb per minute, probably less.

5,000,000Mb / 8Mb per minute = over 434 days of non-stop high definition porn.

I think it will have to come with a voucher for some sort of repair surgery afterwards though,

forget storage space, that's more than enough now, do something about increasing the speed of harddrive and work on solid state drives. anything to remove that last mechanical part of the system.

No, no, no. We need to "Get Perpendicular". So if we Get Perpendicular and then go Vertical (as this does) and we're already using horizontal, does that mean to expand more we need to use horizontal??

Hopefully with this new tech and a higher track density, drive speeds should increase substantially. Any word on wether this will also be built into 2.5" drives. As the desities increase and cooling is harder, etc. I see 2.5" drives becoming the norm in desktops.

5TB hard drive... that would be great.

i could not fill that if i tried i dont think and i have alot of stuff.

but the bottom line is... i would rather have a sh*tload of extra space than run out of it.

right now i have a total of 850GB hdd space... which i dont think ill run out of to soon... i got roughly 150GB left it's filling up somewhat quick but there is alot of stuff i could delete rather quickly if i had to.

but seriously... these bigger and bigger hard drives are mainly only for people who download mass ammounts of stuff.... cause the average pc user that downloads mainly mp3's and general use stuff... they wont really need more than probably 200GB tops.

I've said the same thing about every new HD I've ever bought. 500gigs should do fine. I have 4 of those and they're crammed full.

The "average consumer" will need tons of space. I did some PC maintenance on a friends computer and it was loaded with junk. There were several dozen copies of the same files spread everywhere. He's still on dialup and uses AOL and there were 15 copies of that. He thinks he put whatever he wants on there and it will never fill up. 160gig HD with XP and 256megs RAM no doubt.

all i have to say is Oink and GY torrent.net ;x i am pushing a terabyte now. that would be easy to get it filed, especially with that new internet that comcast announced.

illustrick said,
all i have to say is Oink and GY torrent.net ;x i am pushing a terabyte now. that would be easy to get it filed, especially with that new internet that comcast announced.

pshh... comcast kicks people off for downloading 100GB (combined down/up actually) they'd never let you get anywhere near that... once you hit that limit its one warning, second time its you are off their network for a year...

Windows 2005 Media Center Edition is a much better way to fill-up a hard drive. I have a 320GB hard drive, I record several shows and I am always running into capacity constraints.