G-Form drop iPad from 100,000 feet

While the iPad is undoubtedly a sales success, many people will inevitably have dropped their own, potentially damaging or breaking it. What probably has not been tried before, however, is dropping your iPad from 100,000 feet. G-Form have decided to see if this is possible for the iPad to survive, as Neowin user FMH reported to us on the forums.

This is not the first time that G-Form have shown the extreme strength of their cases. Previously, the company has attempted to push their MacBook Pro case beyond its limits. Their attempt involved dropping an Apple MacBook Pro from a balcony, while protected in one of their cases. Another test G-Form performed involved a moving car and an iPad 2 in one of their cases. While the chances of this kind of damage happening are slim, the confidence the company places in their products is impressive. We can likely all agree the chances of leaving our iPad 2 on a road, or doing work with a laptop on a balcony are slim, but now G-Form are back with their most extreme test yet.

The company took an iPad and one of their cases for it, and then decided to repeat their MacBook Pro test - from 100,000 feet. For reference this is approximately 30.48 kilometres, meaning the iPad fell from the stratosphere in its descent to earth. The drop is only slightly shorter than the highest parachute drop ever recorded, which was from slightly over 102,000 feet, and was performed by Joseph Kittinger in 1960 as part of Project Excelsior. Both Kittinger and the iPad tested by G-Form managed to reach an altitude higher than the famous SR-71 plane, which first appeared in 1966.

The company filmed the descent of the iPad in HD, and this can be watched below. As is usual for unusual videos on the internet, some comments aim to disprove the legitimacy of what is shown. As always, take these with some consideration but do not put too much faith in their accuracy.

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So that one didn't smash but, "@edsheeran: Just dropped my iPad on the road and cracked the screen. Smashed ball bag"
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Clearly fake, as everyone knows the earth is flat, that must be photoshop or something.

Also, only 70 yards? that's unbelievable. Normally when ppl launch balloons, their payload lands hundreds of yards, if not miles away, even with no wind.

Yes, because I will be drunk enough to parachute myself with an iPad to tape or shoot at someone while he/she is falling.

The camera did not break during the fall either. I guess its not a big deal for an iPad not breaking.

Edit: Oh wait their camera has a casing as well...

Edited by tanjiajun_34, Jan 8 2012, 4:14am :

Looks realistic, but the temperature at that altitude probably should have frozen the insides and made the iPad stop functioning right? I've been in planes at 30,000 feet and seen the temperature outside at 30 degrees below zero (fahrenheit) at that altitude, isn't the operating temperature of the iPad between like 30 and 90 degrees?

you apparently forgot another factor here. It was done nearby area 51. I suggest to send Mulder and Scully out there to investigate possible tempering of the results by aliens. Apparently a guidance system was installed secretely that would lead the ipad back to the lauch site....

when does anyone ever drop their device into sand? Drop it from that height on concerete then we will see how good it is.

Soldiers33 said,
when does anyone ever drop their device into sand? Drop it from that height on concerete then we will see how good it is.

Umm... Assuming the video is legit (too many clips... don't know if it is) then it's drop location was likely completely random.

Soldiers33 said,
when does anyone ever drop their device into sand? Drop it from that height on concerete then we will see how good it is.

Sand... with big rocks scattered around..

Right. The thing goes 100,000 feet in the air, tied to a balloon, and it falls 70 yards away from its original location?

_dandy_ said,
Right. The thing goes 100,000 feet in the air, tied to a balloon, and it falls 70 yards away from its original location?

The guy says he was about 70 yards away from the iPad, not from his start. For all we know they've had to drive for 2 hours to get that close to it. He was commenting on the current readout of the location device, and the fact that they should be seeing it soon

Seems like everybody is overlooking another important question? How did they keep this thing warm that high up? It gets to about -50 to -60 C when you get up that high, so they would have had to pack it with hand warmers or something.

The fact that it has something attached to the back of the case to weight it so the ipad stays face up makes this kinda false. Drop it just in the case with nothing else and see what happens.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Does yours have a g-force case?

The case doesn't seem to protect the glass all that much if it lands face down on a pointy object if the case is open

neufuse said,

The case doesn't seem to protect the glass all that much if it lands face down on a pointy object if the case is open

The iPad in the video didn't land screen side down.

I am certainly not the worlds biggest Apple supporter (in fact that's an understatement) but isn't this a tribute to Apple's product design moreso than anything else?

Jelly2003 said,
I am certainly not the worlds biggest Apple supporter (in fact that's an understatement) but isn't this a tribute to Apple's product design moreso than anything else?

It's a tribute to the case and/or luck. Why? Because if you dropped the iPad from 4 feet onto concrete and it landed screen first it'd most likely shatter.

I love the comments on the YouTube page calling fake because they dropped theirs from 4 foot and it shattered the screen.
Do people not know that this is a demonstration for a case, not just the iPad?
Still it could be a fake, just not on those grounds.

So...how many people are going to have to worry about dropping an ipad from that height? As someone else said on here...once it hits terminal velocity...the speed stays constant.

These people need to find a more useful utilization of their time.

In other words...who cares?

The same reason watches are tested to 100m depth when the worst you'll do is splash water over it from a tap.

texasghost said,
So...how many people are going to have to worry about dropping an ipad from that height? As someone else said on here...once it hits terminal velocity...the speed stays constant.

These people need to find a more useful utilization of their time.

In other words...who cares?

It shows that their case will protect from basically any impact... Lets say throwing it full force into a wall... Thats something I'd be glad to know the case will handle. Not saying i'd ever whip an iPad at a wall if I owned one but you never know when something bad happens where someone could get mad about something and just throw it.

Neobond said,
Except this isn't Apple doing the promoting, it's a company that sells protective sleeves

You know very well there are a lot of people outside Apple that will do anything to promote Apple and the article spams "ipad" everywhere. If it were a GalaxyTab it would be "Tablet survives 100,000 feet drop"

sam232 said,

You know very well there are a lot of people outside Apple that will do anything to promote Apple and the article spams "ipad" everywhere. If it were a GalaxyTab it would be "Tablet survives 100,000 feet drop"

As somebody said, their product will sell better if they show that it protects the market leader. "protects tablet that nobody has heard of at 100,000 feet" wouldn't be as good a line.

The Camera wouldn't survive the shock of that hitting the ground at that speed, made up rubbish

n_K said,
The Camera wouldn't survive the shock of that hitting the ground at that speed, made up rubbish

it obviously had a parachute

dancedar said,
Once it hits terminal velocity it doesn't matter how high it falls from it won't go any faster.

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

s3n4te said,

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

Um what? I think you need to crack open a physics book. The doppler effect is dependent on the speed of sound, not the terminal velocity of an object... And even at the speed of sound, compressed waves will hardly induce a force.

s3n4te said,

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

So when an object hits terminal velocity, it accelerates? Interesting.

s3n4te said,

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

You need to hit the books a bit more, doppler effect isn't related to terminal velocity or downwards forces while in fall

s3n4te said,

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

terminal velocity means

Air friction force = gravitational force... This means that it will not accelerate.. Think of the word terminal velocity... terminal (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/terminal) = limit, velocity= vector speed..

therefore it is the limit speed in that direction and will not accelerate anymore..

s3n4te said,

Once it reaches terminal velocity, the doppler effect imparts a force on the object downwards greater than the air friction. This further increases the momentum of the object, and upon impact asserts a larger impulse.

So what you're saying that a person with a parachute will hit the ground with more force than a person freefalling? LOL

Astra.Xtreme said,

Um what? I think you need to crack open a physics book. The doppler effect is dependent on the speed of sound, not the terminal velocity of an object... And even at the speed of sound, compressed waves will hardly induce a force.

I believe he was talking about the doppler effect on the waves of gravitational force.