Gigabyte makes building your own all-in-one PC possible

Many people here at Neowin take pleasure in building their own desktop computers from scratch, using a variety of readily available enthusiast parts to make the PC as powerful or as economical as possible. Gigabyte has provided a number of these sorts of parts over the years, but now they want to expand into a new DIY realm: self-building all-in-one computers.

At CES 2013, Gigabyte has teamed up with Intel to provide a new set of standards and components that will help you build a computer right into the back of a monitor. Through specially-developed cases - which include an LCD panel mounted to the front - and ultra-low-profile mini-ITX motherboards (which Intel are dubbing "Thin Mini-ITX"), creating one of these computers will become much easier.

One particular Thin Mini-ITX motherboard, which PCWorld managed to take a look at, uses Intel's H77 chipset and contains an LGA 1155 CPU socket for use with low-power Ivy Bridge processors.  By combining this with one of Gigabyte's DIY AIO monitor-cases, complete with a full cooling solution and drive bays, you can make an all-in-one system just how you like it.

Of course, these DIY all-in-one systems are not meant to be particularly powerful, as the form-factor prevents you from adding in a discrete graphics card at this stage; this means you'll be stuck with Intel's integrated on-die graphics in the processor you choose. However the form factor will be compact and ideal for those people who don't want a full desktop, but want a specific hardware build for possibly cheaper.

The DIY all-in-one components will start to hit the market in Q1 2013 - motherboards will be in the $100 range, while the cases will cost upwards of $300 depending on the display size you desire.

Source: PCWorld

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Sony files patent to block the use of used games

Next Story

Windows RT flash player tool lets you easily white-list websites

24 Comments

View more comments

Using the Thin Mini ITX standard why not? It wouldn't be hard to make a case and cooling system to match, it would be just like those extreme custom case mods people do.

Ohhh interesting, I will be following this to see where it goes.
I'm sure there are a few casual people who would like this, and I was just thinking you could use it to easily build a HTPC on to the back of your TV if it is free standing and not using the existing mounts

Teebor said,
Ohhh interesting, I will be following this to see where it goes.
I'm sure there are a few casual people who would like this, and I was just thinking you could use it to easily build a HTPC on to the back of your TV if it is free standing and not using the existing mounts

That there is the problem with these all in one machines. If your display is damaged or you want something bigger or newer you're pretty much stuffed.

What would be more interesting if they added a new vesa mount spec that included a VESA port/connection (hdmi) as well so when the ultra thin htpc is connected to the back of the monitor, the hdmi/usb plugs into it. Then, a lot monitors could then be sold and a simple VESA slim line case connected to the back of all monitors universally.

But yeah, your original statement works. We've been using vesa brackets for mini-itx and mac mini's for a while now on standard moniotrs and TVs... even with existing mounts you can get brackets that fit between them both.

Such a device exists, and it's from Intel itself - the Intel NUC.
http://www.intel.com/content/w...computing-introduction.html

It's based around i3 - therefore, it's not exactly wimpy by any means -and the DC3217 BY supports mSATA (for SSD) and dual Thunderbolt for even more device connectivity (in addition to five USB ports and dual HDMI 1.4a for displays). The DC3217YE drops the Thunderbolt - but supports everything else. Both also mount to the back of ANY display that supports VESA mounts via the optional VESA mount kit.

Haha yeah AIOs have always been a locked down area in terms of customizability this will be pretty cool I'll definitely be following this!

Still doesn't look like you're going to be able to fit a decent graphics card in the back of that, unlike HP's Z1 AIO's.

Self-building computers! Must be impressive to see all those parts magically float in the air and assemble themselves!

Make more sense to make a case that you can just plug parts into, like plugin MB, plugin graphics card, plugin cpu etc etc all housed in nice shaped cases so its a simple slot the part in the right size hole in the case and you are sorted.

This would make building a pc very easy even a kid could do it, it would be like one of those kids toys you put the shapes in the right holes. Also if the system has an error like ram is fooked just make lights on front of case to say what part is faulty.

MrAnalysis said,
Make more sense to make a case that you can just plug parts into, like plugin MB, plugin graphics card, plugin cpu etc etc all housed in nice shaped cases so its a simple slot the part in the right size hole in the case and you are sorted.

This would make building a pc very easy even a kid could do it, it would be like one of those kids toys you put the shapes in the right holes. Also if the system has an error like ram is fooked just make lights on front of case to say what part is faulty.


The frequency of such failures is so low that the economics of such a design make no sense.

It's also very, very poor design to build a product around what's almost always a one-time assembly.

Waste of time. As someone previously mentioned, if the LCD takes a dump good luck finding one. All you need is a Mini iTX case standard that can attach to the back of a VESA mount & share the power cord with the LCD monitor. The VESA connector is replicated on the back of the iTX case so you can still mount an arm. I was always a fan of these AIO designs except for the throwaway appliance mentality of the design.

The idea is based on an existing (much smaller than ITX) design - that of the Intel NUC. And you can use ANY display that includes VESA mount support (I pointed out that the NUC - either version - has an optional mount kit that uses VESA mounts - which are standard in most PC or TV FP displays), therefore, if the display croaks, change out just that. (The PC part is either hidden behind the monitor or external to both PC components AND display. You can even use a repurposed TV - such as one with a dead tuner - as long as it supports HDMI.)

Commenting is disabled on this article.