GoG.com adds Windows 8 support to over 400 older PC games

When a new version of Windows comes out, there's always a risk that older Windows applications, particularly games, won't be compatible with the new OS. If you have an older PC, that means your copy of your favorite old PC game might not run if you make the plunge and switch to Windows 8.

The folks over at the PC game download site GoG.com are well aware of this issue. The site has a massive amount of games that were originally supposed to run just on MS-DOS and much older versions of Windows, and have taken the time to make sure most of them run on Windows 7. Today, the company announced that it has made an effort to update many titles in its game catalog to Windows 8 as well.

In a post today on the GoG.com site, the company said:

So as of today we're adding official Windows 8 support for most of the games in GOG.com catalog. There are currently 431 titles fixed, tested, and reported to be working properly under Microsoft's new OS. Note that most of these have not had the master builds updated, so you shouldn’t need to redownload the installer or anything. Some of the titles, our build ninjas performed their usual magic on, and they’ll work now in Windows 8--and we’re even adding Windows 7 support to a few. We’ll also be adding more Windows 8 games as time goes by and we’ve got time to apply some fixes to more of the classic games in the catalog.

This is great news for Windows 8 owners who might have been worried that they could have issues if they downloaded certain games from GoG.com. The company, which also doesn't use DRM for any of its titles, has recently branched out and started offering a small selection of new games in addition to its many classic PC games.

Source: GoG.com | Image via GoG.com

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So wait, they have been updated but I don't need to re-download them How does that work?

Do I just download a fix for it once installed?

brent3000 said,
So wait, they have been updated but I don't need to re-download them How does that work?
Most GOG releases already worked fine on Windows 8 so all they had to do was update the version number on the store page.

Games that have had their installers updated show a new major version number on the shelf (2.0.0 or similar) and will also be seen as updated by the GOG Downloader if you use that.

Games that have not had their installers updated will still list the old major version number on the shelf (1.0.0 or similar).

Depends entirely on the setup if you have it set to deny all traffic that doesn't have an exclusion then steam most definitely wont work and you'll have to create an exclusion its even more of a PITA with a network firewall and all this to run a friken single player game no wonder people turn to piracy.

As for your comment you have your firewall configured to allow all outbound traffic

TPreston said,
if you have it set to deny all traffic that doesn't have an exclusion then steam most definitely wont work

One option is to force Steam to run in offline mode by making a steam.cfg file as described here:

http://forums.steampowered.com...?p=16112412&postcount=8

This will only work with games that are fully downloaded; games that are incomplete cannot be run in offline mode, and you also can't add a game while in offline mode. If you already have all the games you want in a fully patched state this should work great however.

This only blocks internet access for Steam itself, not the games, for which you'd still need to make your own firewall exceptions and so forth.

TPreston said,
Depends entirely on the setup if you have it set to deny all traffic that doesn't have an exclusion then steam most definitely wont work and you'll have to create an exclusion its even more of a PITA with a network firewall and all this to run a friken single player game no wonder people turn to piracy.

As for your comment you have your firewall configured to allow all outbound traffic


I don't imagine that should turn people to piracy so much as to cracking.

It seems like a much more beneficial path for all involved to buy the game and just download a crack/patch to circumvent certain troublesome behaviors. Less downloading is involved, updates are somewhat easier, you support the skilled developers and game designers who had nothing to do with the bad behavior and everything to do with the fun you're having, and you have a...slightly...reduced risk of picking up malware.

Just my two cents. Cracking solves the problems people generally claim to have, and as long as cracking is around, these problems alone won't justify all-out piracy.

SHS said,

Frist all both you have it wrong
GOG it file server there is no Client Software

Good! I want to play a game not join some social network for gamers or mess with my firewall.

TPreston said,

Good! I want to play a game not join some social network for gamers or mess with my firewall.


Can you explain this? I hear this every now and then, and I have trouble understanding what's going on. I haven't had to dig around in my firewall settings, router settings, and so on for...well, years. And yet, when I attempted to replace my roommate's router with a newer, better N router, he kind of freaked at the horror of reconfiguring it to allow games to work.

I play all sorts of online games, connect to all sorts of online servers, and everything just takes care of itself, on a fully secured wireless home network.

So what's the deal?

Joshie said,

when I attempted to replace my roommate's router with a newer, better N router, he kind of freaked at the horror of reconfiguring it to allow games to work.

So what's the deal?

I believe its more of a problem for pc gamers. When I hosted a dedicated server for pc games I had to reconfigure a lot of settings on my router so people could connect to my pc and so data could go to the outside game server. I had problems not being able to find/connect to game servers because my router settings. Pc games use all different ports and your computer firewall can work against you if not setup correct. I never had to changes settings in my router for consoles. consoles are over all easier to use.

This helps changing the settings for your router
http://portforward.com/routers.htm

TPreston said,

Good! I want to play a game not join some social network for gamers or mess with my firewall.


That odd as long time Steam user who has been there 8 years, I never have never had any of those problem

SHS said,

That odd as long time Steam user who has been there 8 years, I never have never had any of those problem

It makes sense that there'd be tinkering required for several scenarios where a user would want to run a server, but on the other hand, a lot of modern software seems able to figure all of this stuff out on its own, and it's easy to imagine many of us will never encounter this need, while several of us will encounter it often.

Naturally this will shape our opinions in separate directions. Then we can argue knowing we'll never get anywhere! :3

Joshie said,

Naturally this will shape our opinions in separate directions. Then we can argue knowing we'll never get anywhere! :3

That's a good life quote. With a little twicking it could be perfect.
This should be reused.

Breach said,
DOSBox?

Depends on the game. The older DOS based ones come with DOXBox pre-configured and set to go yea. They do sell newer games too however, minus the usual copy protection.

Of course you can download most of those games from abandonware websites but GoG still has several advantages:
- They're one of the few (often the only) websites where you can legally buy a copy of those games
- They include all the necessary fixes to make the games work on newer hardware or versions of windows: yes, that can mean just repackaging them with DOSbox for DOS games but for old Windows games it can mean a plethora of fixes and mods to get them working (getting some older Windows games to work on Windows Vista/7 can be a real nightmare)
- Many games include additional content like scanned manuals, soundtracks and stuff you usually have to dig for, some of which is GoG exclusive
- The DRM is removed and the games become stand-alone so you can run them wherever you want without installing GoG software and you can also keep "physical" copies of them, no need for additional patches or disc emulators
- You can re-download the games as much as you want and like this articles says they keep them updated to fix bugs or maintain compatibility with newer versions of Windows

So in the end it all depends on whether you want a legal copy of the game or not and how much you value their service but I still think that some of their repackaged games (like my Wing Commander example on the post above that is as good as a remastered edition) are amazing deals especially when they're heavily discounted during their special sales.

So Gog is a fully licensed site? I always had people telling me don't buy from them they are "pirates" reselling old games.. always wanted to buy some older games but never knew if I should truly trust them or not

neufuse said,
So Gog is a fully licensed site? I always had people telling me don't buy from them they are "pirates" reselling old games.. always wanted to buy some older games but never knew if I should truly trust them or not

Yep, they are fully licensed to sell the games they have in their catalog

John Callaham said,

Yep, they are fully licensed to sell the games they have in their catalog

any other sites out there like them? I always stumble on them but never know who to trust

They're not just reselling them: they improve those game including fixes, popular mods, manuals, soundtracks, wallpapers and sometimes they even go as far as including awesome extras, like on Wing Commander 4 that on GoG comes with DVD-quality cutscenes or WC3 that comes with content that was excluded from the PC release (sounds weird, huh? despite being originally a PC game the console ports came with many additional unreleased videos that covered important parts of the backstory).

neufuse said,

any other sites out there like them? I always stumble on them but never know who to trust

Huh?! Nothing is wrong with GoG. They're widely used and respected. Theres nothing illigal here at all. Whoever told you they're pirates are simply ****ing idiots.

1Pixel said,

Huh?! Nothing is wrong with GoG. They're widely used and respected. Theres nothing illigal here at all. Whoever told you they're pirates are simply ****ing idiots.

When a site sells "out of print" or "abandonded" games people wonder if its legit or not... that's why you have to ask

Good, or perhaps I should say 'ok' as this is what you'd expect proffesionals to do. They're providing a service on the Windows platform. The platform has a new interface but that doesn't mean they can stop supporting their customers on it. Newell can learn a thing or two from GOG.

They are two completely different services: GoG handles the games directly so you get all sorts of fixes, improvements and extra content while Valve is basically just a store that sells what the publisher gives them, still, they could certainly learn to enforce at least some minimal quality check on the third-party titles they sell. Some publishers release games already broken at release and never care fixing or updating them for newer versions of Windows.

A very popular example: the ID collections (DOOM, Heretic, Hexen, Wolfestein) where every single game is basically broken. The older games come with an outdated version of DOSBOX and have all sort of screen corruptions and most of the games that are windows-native still don't work well: for example Quake 1 requires modified environmental variables or Steam launched with admin privileges, Quake 2 requires patched DLLs or the savegames don't work and Quake 3 conflicts with Steam's own overlay. This is just one of the most blatant examples though, many older games don't work well because they're not compatible with Windows 7 or because they don't support multi-core processors, some even go as far as forcing users to turn off desktop compositing, reminding me of how some older games on XP required 256 colors mode.

Edited by francescob, Nov 26 2012, 8:49pm :

They're hardly even doing anything.

Anything that runs on Win 7 will run on 8 anyway, so they basically just checking each game to make sure it actually works on 8 and giving it official compatibility support.

All my GoG games run on 8 with no issues at all.