Google acquires mobile software company Quickoffice

Google is making a play to expand its efforts for adding and improving its productivity software products. This week, the company announced that it has acquired Quickoffice, which develops and sells a line of office software made mostly for smartphones and tablets.

In a post on its official blog, Google stated:

Today, consumers, businesses and schools use Google Apps to get stuff done from anywhere, with anyone and on any device. Quickoffice has an established track record of enabling seamless interoperability with popular file formats, and we'll be working on bringing their powerful technology to our Apps product suite.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed. However, Google hinted strongly that at some point it will try to integrate its new Quickoffice products with its current Google Apps software. Until that happens, Google said that it will continue to support Openoffice software for its current users.

Versions of Quickoffice have been released for iOS, Android, Blackberry and Symbian-based smartphones and tablets. The software includes applications such as Quickword, Quicksheet and QuickPoint, all of which are compatible with documents made in Microsoft Office formats. The Quickoffice website said that its software has been installed in over 300 million devices since it was launched.

Source: Google

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9 Comments

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QuickOffice was my favorite application on iOS for .doc and .xls read/edit need. I am a bit worried on what Goggle plans to do with it. But in the meantime, I am waiting on Microsoft to release their iPhone/iPad Office suite. So we'll see..

Pink Floyd said,
QuickOffice was my favorite application on iOS for .doc and .xls read/edit need. I am a bit worried on what Goggle plans to do with it. But in the meantime, I am waiting on Microsoft to release their iPhone/iPad Office suite. So we'll see..

RIM bought "Documents to Go" years ago and that hasn't went away for Android or iOS. I wouldn't worry too much about what Google plans for Quick Office.

As for Microsoft Office, it is tied in to SkyDrive. That's good and all but what if you wanted something tied in to Google Drive as well? Choose what works best for you and forget about the rest.

Ever since Microsoft made Office Mobile available for my Nokia 701, honestly, who cares any more...

It came pre-installed(QuickOffice), yet to use it and by actually able to edit stuff, they needed like 6,41 euros...

M_Lyons10 said,
Hm... Shutting down another competitor?

troll much on Google threads as you always do?? competitor?? thats laughable... quick office is never a competitor to google.. second read the release statement
"Quickoffice has a strong base of users, and we look forward to supporting them while we work on an even more seamless, intuitive and integrated experience.
"

M_Lyons10 said,
Hm... Shutting down another competitor?

That's like saying Microsoft acquired Skype to shut it down. Both companies purchased them to add to their existing platform feature sets.

I can see this being a good match for Google. Although I prefer the OpenDocument format myself rather than proprietary ones.

M_Lyons10 said,
Hm... Shutting down another competitor?

I don't see why Google would want to shut them down if they can integrate it into their existing business...

"Google hinted strongly that at some point it will try to integrate its new Quickoffice products with its current Google Apps software".
___

Did you really give your comment some thought?

simplezz said,

Although I prefer the OpenDocument format myself rather than proprietary ones.

Uh? This is either worded very poorly or you don't understand a few things.

I hate to defend Google here, but technically since GDocs works as a cloud application service and supports OpenDocument and OfficeXML, it really doesn't have its own file type, as the stored data structure on the Google servers is not accessible

Until you export or save something from GDocs how it is stored is irrelevant. (Think of Word having a document open, and how it uses RAM to manage the document is also irrelevant until it is saved or exported to a specific format.

The second thing that Sun has done a wonderful job of obfuscating is that OpenDocument is a proprietary format, in some ways more so than OfficeXML.

However being proprietary is again irrelevant, because it doesn't matter how something is made if the process is very explained and openly available. It only becomes a problem when it is not regulated by a standards body, and changes can be made that break or change the product.

In this regard, both OfficeXML and OpenDocument are held accountable by standards bodies. And as far as standards enforcement 'OfficeXML' is goverened by an additional standards body than OpenDocument. This means OfficeXML has standards regulation redundancy that in theory adds another layer to keep it more consistent and compatible than OpenDocument.


People too easy get fooled by terms like 'Open' or 'Open Source' and 'Proprietary' to imply or mean things they simply do not truly represent.

Often this happens to promote 'Open' as always being better, but in reality, this isn't any better of an indication of 'better' or 'accessible' because the core concept of 'sharing ideas' is lost in a lot of 'Open' projects.

Providing 'ideas' and 'reference designs' freely is far more important than 'Open Source'.

Usable information balanced with complexity is the key and often Open Source is like giving someone a DNA sequence versus just saying the person's name is Joe and his parents are Jim and Sally. The latter is usable in the world 99.99999% of the time, and the cool part is that the DNA sequence can still be obtained, but confusing people with the complexity initially is seldom needed.

(Even the most complex piece of software runs in machine code, and if necessary is readable even if you don't have the higher level source code. And if you can convey the idea of what the software is doing and how it does it, you don't need the source code to replicate it.)