Google and Verizon deny net neutrality violations

Yesterday, The New York Times posted an article that revealed a deal between Verizon and Google that would go against the tenets of net neutrality. The deal would set up Verizon to deliver content faster at a premium to the content provider. For example, Google could pay Verizon to give priority to YouTube videos. Understandably, this caused a minor uproar across the Internet as people waited for a response from the companies.

Today, as reported by MSNBC, both Google and Verizon are denying those claims. Google posted on Twitter: “@NYTimes is wrong. We've not had any convos with VZN about paying for carriage of our traffic. We remain committed to an open Internet.” David Fish, Verizon executive director of media relations, followed suit.

"It fundamentally misunderstands our purpose. As we said in our earlier FCC filing, our goal is an Internet policy framework that ensures openness and accountability, and incorporates specific FCC authority, while maintaining investment and innovation. To suggest this is a business arrangement between our companies is entirely incorrect."

While the two companies are certainly tied to each other as far mobile connectivity goes with Verizon carrying multiple flagship Android handsets, the notion that the two Internet juggernauts are in talks about media delivery is not hard to believe. Google, however, is adamant in its backing of the Open Internet Coalition, one of the leading groups behind the drive for net neutrality. Even if the companies were talking about such a deal, many, like president of Public Knowledge Gigi B. Sohn, believe that a decision that ground-breaking “is too large a matter to be decided by negotiations involving two companies, even companies as big as Verizon and Google."

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13 Comments

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FWIW... not a Google fan, but just common sense...
1) Consider the source -- the NYTimes is hardly the gold std for journalism. Besides being sloppy & sometimes [often?] wrong, Many of their writers are also known to advocate [shill?] for their favored political causes, & Google is in the current US admin's gunsights while AT&T is favored [both have been featured in past Neowin articles].

2) Google is a biz... their priority, their job is to make their stuff work so they make money. It's in their best interest to make access to their products [like YouTube] the best possible. If the story is true, they were just doing their job, & in fact, if/when you can't get fast access to something like YouTube, Google gets the blame for not doing their job.

3) Net Neutrality is a nice idealistic principle that's in grave danger of being hijacked, it's original intent not just forgotten but obliterated. As it's currently being advertised for the most part, Net Neutrality would be the means for some people to increase &/or acquire power [e.g. the politically connected], it would be a means for one or more favored companies to increase both profits & control combined with the ability to lower service levels, & it would be a tool for politically based rewards. In a nutshell, Net Neutrality would be anything but neutral.

Sawyer12 said,
Why dont they just move the YouTube servers nearer to Verizons datacenters. No ones breaking any laws technically.

I lol'ed.

It's hard to believe they would do it. I don't know who to believe. I wouldn't put it past them as they are getting their fingers in everything but I don't think they would leave themselves so open either.

Do no evil? lolz

Anyway, after reading the specifics of the agreement, while Verizon won't throttle landline access (FiOS/DSL/etc.), they can throttle wireless access. Considering that the most popular Android phones are on Verizon (for the most part), this looks really bad for Google regardless of their intentions.

lordcanti86 said,
Do no evil? lolz

Anyway, after reading the specifics of the agreement, while Verizon won't throttle landline access (FiOS/DSL/etc.), they can throttle wireless access. Considering that the most popular Android phones are on Verizon (for the most part), this looks really bad for Google regardless of their intentions.

Erm... not sure where your comment is going, it doesn't seem to have any point, just a few random "facts" without any explanation of why they are positive or negative.

Are you sure you're not trolling?

vaximily said,

Erm... not sure where your comment is going, it doesn't seem to have any point, just a few random "facts" without any explanation of why they are positive or negative.

Are you sure you're not trolling?


My point as that Net Neutrality (as we know it) won't exist on Verizon's wireless network thanks to this agreement. Considering that more and more people are using mobile internet, this is very bad for consumers.