Google takes its advertising campaign overseas

Google is taking its currently US-only "Gone Google" advertising campaign overseas to countries including Britain, France, Canada, Japan, Australia and Singapore, as the company seeks to lure businesses away from traditional software to their cloud-based services.

Through the "Gone Google" campaign, the company tells the stories of corporate customers who have switched to Google Apps, meaning that they "no longer have to deal with the hassles of managing e-mail servers or rolling out software updates."

It represents a rare move by Google into the world of mass-market advertising; demonstrating the level of competition in the market to provide businesses with email and office software. With Microsoft and IBM dominating the enterprise email market, Google is hoping companies will be convinced by the lower maintenance costs of using their cloud-based services.

However, questions have been raised over the reliability of such services for business users due to recent high-profile outages, including a few outages of Gmail this year alone.

More than 2 million businesses and 20 million active users now use the California-based company's online office software. The figure includes both large businesses that pay $50 a year per user, as well as small companies which can get the software for free.

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15 Comments

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Sorry to be pedantic here but wasn't the entire Personal Computer Revolution all about taking computer power away from government and big business and placing it in the hands of the people? And now we're supposed to feel good about a big company who wants to control our access to our own information again?

Whats worse, there are idiots who think this is 'progress'. Cloud computing? More like Clown Computing. Hard disks are cheap and I don't need big corporations telling me what I can and can't do with my own data. And with my HTC HD2 and internet access I can access and control my own personal 4TB server from anywhere on the planet. Why do I need Google?

What do you think this Revolution will be called? The DumbAss Revolution?

i think that cloud services should complement, not replace apps you install on your machine... they each have their pros and cons...

I just don't know. I myself wouldn't be comfortable relying on a service like this for my business data, etc. Maybe it's just me?

Tecsys3 said,
fyi canada isn't overseas.. -_-

I wondered how long before someone else mentioned this. I noticed it while reading from my cell phone so couldn't post it. Now that I'm home from work, went to post this but saw you already had.

Canada....overseas. -.-

nekkidtruth said,
I wondered how long before someone else mentioned this. I noticed it while reading from my cell phone so couldn't post it. Now that I'm home from work, went to post this but saw you already had.

Canada....overseas. -.-

yea i felt compelled to comment for once after reading that...

like hell.. it really adds to the ignorant american stereotype :-/

thats where business owners will worry...

Internet goes down or files need to be recovered etc and changes it takes time and needs to be dome by google whihc takes time and also gives someone else YOUR files

I think it requires a new way of thinking...

By your logic, depositing money in a bank account would also be a bad idea, since you're handing over your money to someone else to manage.

As long as there are robust data redundancy facilities in place and a strong security/confidentiality policy, I don't see any real issues with this.

That's definitely a concern, but I would consider it an extreme case.

Less extreme, what if something goes down and you just lose some data? Big headache. I don't think the risk is warranted when you can purchase software pretty affordably that you can install on your machine.