Google Compute Engine now supports Windows Server 2008 R2

Google has announced at the Google Cloud Platform Live event that it will be supporting Windows Server 2008 R2 based virtual machines in Compute Engine, in addition to reduced pricing and discounts for the company's cloud services.

According to Google, although the hardware prices have gone down over the last few years, the price of cloud services have stayed the same, and to address this they have cut down the rates across all their Cloud Platform services by 30-85%.

Services which are covered under the new pricing plans include Compute Engine, App Engine, Cloud Storage and BigQuery. Additionally, Google has announced support for Microsoft's Windows Server 2008 R2 for the first time, which will be available to customers as part of a limited preview initially. Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on the other hand will now be generally available to Compute Engine customers.

An interesting announcement from the Live event, is of sustained-use discounts which reduces the costs for the clients by more than half after prolonged use. 

Discounts start automatically when you use a VM for over 25% of the month. When you use a VM for an entire month, you save an additional 30% over the new on-demand prices, for a total reduction of 53% over our original prices.

Google hopes to gain more users globally with the latest pricing overhaul for its cloud services, and with Microsoft trying to increase awareness about Azure, the cloud services market will be interesting to watch.

Source: Google | Image via Google

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15 Comments

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trojan_market said,
google cloud is so behind of Aws and Ms Azure. Azure is a beast now.

How can it be a beast when studies continue to show that it's the slowest among Amazon and Google?

The most used cloud system is Amazon. Google is gunning for them by cutting prices across the board. Amazon happens to be the most expensive service counting their 8 cores with 30 gigs Ram; where Microsoft uses 14 gb Ram with their 8 cores....it's probably no wonder it's the slowest.

It's going to be very interesting to see if Google can topple the enterprise cloud computing space as it did with personal-consumer computing. They have already started by cutting costs, which is something that they can do, but Amazon can't and Microsoft doesn't know how. If Google is, INDEED, effective then Amazon and Microsoft will have no choice but to lower their prices and that's ultimately great for enterprise customers.

VictorWho said,

How can it be a beast when studies continue to show that it's the slowest among Amazon and Google?

The most used cloud system is Amazon. Google is gunning for them by cutting prices across the board. Amazon happens to be the most expensive service counting their 8 cores with 30 gigs Ram; where Microsoft uses 14 gb Ram with their 8 cores....it's probably no wonder it's the slowest.

It's going to be very interesting to see if Google can topple the enterprise cloud computing space as it did with personal-consumer computing. They have already started by cutting costs, which is something that they can do, but Amazon can't and Microsoft doesn't know how. If Google is, INDEED, effective then Amazon and Microsoft will have no choice but to lower their prices and that's ultimately great for enterprise customers.

Google wins performance in VM boot times, not in dealing with data or scaling.

If you have Azure, maybe you won't need to keep rebooting your freaking VMs, so this 'performance' metric might not be important. :)

first of all aws is amazon cloud I mentioned it. second, I am not sure what you talking about by being slow. you can make a VM up and running in few seconds. don't know why you want it to be faster. also scaling it up is just using a slider you can boost the number of cores and memory. instantly. also feature wise, Azure supports all major OS. the new features such as cloud based active directory is just crazy. I could never imagine 10 years ago active directory will become this much easy. now for running a company you don't even need a server. User Interface also rocks on azure. Its the best looking easiest to use one. the only downside is the price which is little bit more expensive than others but they keep lowering it down. I think Azure has brighter future.

trojan_market said
...also scaling it up is just using a slider you can boost the number of cores and memory...

Just a slight clarification.

With Azure scaling is not just allocation on one server or even one server cluster. It is a distributed OS platform that runs on any number of servers and scales across them, able to not only allocate more RAM or cores, but more servers or even move itself to virtually any number of faster servers as needed.

Azure is quite impressive in how it can allocate needed resources while be location agnostic. This means it can even seamless work with a company's local servers and data.

Azure is brilliant, but is hard to describe and hard to quantify its capabilities.

Ryan Hoffman said,
Great, so we can now deploy an OS that is 3 versions behind the latest release. Snore.
Exactly what I was thinking...

Ryan Hoffman said,
Great, so we can now deploy an OS that is 3 versions behind the latest release. Snore.

True, they may be dragging there feet, however not all business rush out and upgrade to the most current server. They tend to run the oldest currently supported version.

Jason Stillion said,

True, they may be dragging there feet, however not all business rush out and upgrade to the most current server. They tend to run the oldest currently supported version.

How about a company investing in new services, like what Google is offering? :)

It is was simply trying to support existing setups or migration of the most popular version it might make sense. This doesn't make much sense.

Wow are they serious with this? I understand a lot of businesses run old software but honestly how many businesses will want to start NEW cloud deployments using Server 2008 R2. I know some people love to hate on the latest and greatest but Server 2012 and 2012 R2 are a lot more cloud-optimized (and overall efficient) than 2008 R2. This really makes no sense. If anything they should offer the current official release from Microsoft and work their way back if there is that much demand for such old OS.

Mobius Enigma said,

How about a company investing in new services, like what Google is offering? :)
It is was simply trying to support existing setups or migration of the most popular version it might make sense. This doesn't make much sense.

Agree, this is a half hearted attempt, and as a result, there going to lose some customer's to there competitors. I did want to point out there is at least some business they might be able to use it, mind you limited.

Enron said,
I wouldn't be surprised if tomorrow I see a headline "Google announces official YouTube app for Windows Phone 7"

LOL - Thank you for my spit take of the day, coffee all over my shirt. :)