Google may expand to home-security, Dropcam acquisition rumored

Google is allegedly set to acquire yet another franchise, this time in the home-security market. The news hit cyberspace through a blog post from The Information, where wireless monitoring firm Dropcam has been rumored to become part of Google.

The security company currently offers a $149 "Dropcam HD" camera that offers 720p streaming of a location within a household. Users can then access the livestream through an app on Google Play or the App Store, where they can monitor their belongings until their heart's content. The firm offers a plethora of other products on their site, including their premium "Dropcam Pro" for $199. 

The rumored acquisition is set to be pioneered by influential figure Tony Fadell. Having previously led the team that designed the first 18 generations of iPod, as well as the first three generations of iPhone, Mr Fadell currently works at Google which acquired Nest earlier this year.

All in all, if Google decide to expand their empire through this niche industry, we would like to think we're in safe hands. As to how open the masses are for placing a camera in their safe havens, one would perhaps argue the idea is not so attractive.

Source: The Information | Image via digitaltrends

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27 Comments

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Man, Reynolds must be making a killing in tinfoil.

Anyway, I agree with Enron's comment above. Wouldn't want anything tied to one OS or platform.

A guy at work had his home broken in to not long ago, so he bought one of those DVR's that has 8 cameras hooked to it that he can view on the web or on his phone. it's pretty cool.

Well I'm not sure if Google is going to be spying on anyone with it, just like MS probably isn't spying on anyone with Kinect. But it is good to know which companies Google is acquiring because if I'm going to get any of these home automation products, I want one that is an open standard (or one that supports all platforms anyway) and not tied down exclusively to iOS, Android, or even Windows. If I switch to another OS, I don't want to have to rip everything out of my house and start all over. Apps need to be available on all platforms.

Unfortunately, we've seen in the past that Apple uses iOS and its apps as its competitive advantage, and Google has been trying to suppress Windows 8 and Windows Phone adoption by non-support and blocking apps that try to fill the gaps. At least Microsoft has been pretty decent with supporting Android and iOS, but it remains to be seen if they'll really even get in to the home automation segment.

Microsoft supports iOS and Android because what choice do they actually have?

Trust me, I give Microsoft a lot of credit for their support across all platforms, but when you have the Windows Phone guys even asking why they get theirs last, it tells you that it's likely not to do with them being nice, but rather that they have to support the big dogs if they plan to continue increasing the adoption rate of their services.

dead.cell said,
Microsoft supports iOS and Android because what choice do they actually have?

Trust me, I give Microsoft a lot of credit for their support across all platforms, but when you have the Windows Phone guys even asking why they get theirs last, it tells you that it's likely not to do with them being nice, but rather that they have to support the big dogs if they plan to continue increasing the adoption rate of their services.


Regardless of why its happening, you would think more people would applaud MS for taking those steps, but they don't.

Usually it just gets turned around as something negative.

trooper11 said,
Regardless of why its happening, you would think more people would applaud MS for taking those steps, but they don't.

Usually it just gets turned around as something negative.


Well, it's hard to argue that when someone opts to go with something like a Windows Phone but feels abandoned with WP apps not having the priority. Granted, a lot of that has changed or is changing, but to have those negative reactions coming from people who believe in Microsoft kinda sucks too. :/

The reasons are many. Android is the least secure mobile OS out there. Add to it that Google's largest source of revenue is based on gathering as much data as possible about their users and selling it to an industry who has little to no sense of morality is why many people choose to stay as far away from it as possible despite the experience it offers. As soon as it is to Google's advantage to change the privacy model they will. At least with companies that directly sell their products I and my business can vote with my dollars.