Google-Funded Firm Launches DNA Test in Europe

A private firm funded by Google Inc launched its Web-based DNA test in Europe on Tuesday, hoping to build on a successful start in the United States, where the $999 service went on sale in November. Linda Avey and Anne Wojcicki, co-founders of 23andMe, will showcase their service at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, which starts on January 23. Subscribers to 23andMe mail a saliva sample and, four to six weeks later, get the results online, allowing them to learn about inherited traits, their ancestry and -- probably with the help of a professional -- some of their personal disease risks.

"We are receiving overwhelming interest in our services outside the U.S. and are pleased to now offer them in Canada and Europe," Avey said. "We hope to continue to expand our global footprint to additional locations in the future." The Web site, which takes its name from the 23 pairs of chromosomes that make up each person's genome, says it will display more than half a million data points in users' genomes in a form they can visualize and understand. The site does not currently make interpretations about a user's risk for developing such diseases as cancers, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, though users could in some cases get help from experts to make some basic assessments.

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Here in the UK, any person arrested is obliged to give a DNA sample, and they go onto the criminal DNA database, even if they are released without charge. Bearing in mind you can now be arrested in the UK for things like dropping a chewing wrapper or spitting, about 10% of the UK population on on the government DNA database. Say goodbye to your freedom

The article doesn't go into much detail. There is a company in Cambridge that does this, their database only has about 100,000 people on it. I can't think this is enough people to get accurate picture. Maybe when we are all cataloged

(boho said @ #4)
Say goodbye to your freedom :angry:

Where does registering your DNA say anything about killing your freedom? Then, according to what you said, not having an ID, a social security number, a driving lisence, or a passport is believed to be the optimum freedom.

The site does not currently make interpretations about a user's risk for developing such diseases as cancers, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, though users could in some cases get help from experts to make some basic assessments.

No, it probably just sells that info on to life insurance companies...

As long as independent reliable sources can guarantee my DNA isn't going to be posted on billboards along the highway I wouldn't mind :P

Besides - this sounds really interesting.

On the other hand 1,000$ is too pricey for my taste