Google I/O tickets on eBay reach alarming levels

While it's great to see the continued popularity of tech events, most of which regularly sell out, some people have taken it upon themselves to offer tickets to the Google I/O developer's conference taking place between May 10 - 11 at over three times their face value!

The event will cover browser, search and Android news, and the good news is that Google will also stream the keynote addresses live both days, with session videos to go up later, so it's not like you completely miss out if you're not there.

According to Android Central, originally the event took seven days to sell out, for early bird purchasers; then an extended offer of tickets took just 59 minutes to sell out.

Some of those people who got their hands on the tickets have now started listing them on eBay for anything between $200 (with a "Buy it now" price of $2,500) and in one case, $2,025 after 27 bids, at the time of writing. It would seem for some, price is no object.

The general-admission price of a ticket was $$450/550 -- with student/teacher tickets, priced at $150 -- now going for a good $400 or so over face value. Sure there will be food, partying and probably some freebies, but this is just extortionate!

eBay is notorious for crazy stuff appearing on the site for equally crazy prices, and while the company has not yet pulled the auctions let's hope that Google or eBay do the right thing here.

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37 Comments

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I wouldn't call it a scam it's ppl forseeing the demand of something then supplying it at a higher price which ppl will pay for. Trying sell fake tickets outside the place is what I'd call a scam like what happens at venues. If ppl want pay $2000 for a ticket to a google event then they prolly got more money than know what do with and will hardly be stupid

So, we should pull auctions on eBay because some people are stupid and want to pay $2025 to attend? Hell, if you want to pay that much for something, feel free. But it's definitely not worth that much money to me, so I wouldnt buy them. But don't try forcing what others should pay.

Do the tickets have "not for re-sale" on them?
If so, surely they are NOT FOR RE-SALE? If not, why not? Perhaps Google is allowing (is happy for?) this to happen by not printing that on the ticket?

To Stephen Parker - wth do you mean hopefully Google and Ebay do the right thing???? It's not extortionate, it's nothing more than supply and demand. If you are willing to pay the price for something then go for it, if you don't then don't buy it. Everyone has beef with those who sell tickets at a price far above the cost, but that's like buying something from Holt Renfrew or any premium brand store - they sell goods far above cost. As long as there are those willing to pay for it then it will continue.

MistaT40 said,
To Stephen Parker - wth do you mean hopefully Google and Ebay do the right thing???? It's not extortionate, it's nothing more than supply and demand. . .

I can understand your point, however try saying that in your defence in a court room and it won't stand up to anything - not even Judge Judy!

We've the same sort of problem here on our own Auction site called Trademe.co.nz where people used to buy loads of concert tickets and then try selling them for way above face value now trademe force sellers to sell for face value and no more.... Although alot of the time now ticket sellers like tickatek say if you can't prove your the original purchaser then tough titties your ticket is invalid

Wow I hate ticket scalpers, they're nothing but scum bags and low lives. I hope that Google learns from this and implements some kind of security policy to prevent this in the future.

You simply can't have people buying up all the tickets and then selling them at outrageous prices. Its totally unfair to genuine delegates and might put the event out of reach of many people who might get real benefit from it.

I don't think 9 out of a few thousand really counts as "alarming levels". Typical sensationalist headline (directed @ Android Central, not Steven).

What are you talking about? Those 3 things have always been the forefront of our country. Our Country is in bad shape because of our corrupted government.

It always confuses me why ticket companies don't just print the name of the person who bought the ticket directly onto the ticket, then at the event simply get the staff to ID check attendees.

If you can no longer attend then tickets are returned and possibly re-issued with another name. This puts an end to touts, and was successful at events such as Glastonbury (where even your photo was printed on the ticket). Yes there are some increased admin costs, but then its fair to people who actually WANT to attend getting tickets, instead of people block buying with intent to sell for profit.

Just my 2p.

bushbrother said,
It always confuses me why ticket companies don't just print the name of the person who bought the ticket directly onto the ticket, then at the event simply get the staff to ID check attendees.

If you can no longer attend then tickets are returned and possibly re-issued with another name. This puts an end to touts, and was successful at events such as Glastonbury (where even your photo was printed on the ticket). Yes there are some increased admin costs, but then its fair to people who actually WANT to attend getting tickets, instead of people block buying with intent to sell for profit.

Just my 2p.


Sounds to me like you are a little jealous of these folks making easy cash like this.

recursive said,

Sounds to me like you are a little jealous of these folks making easy cash like this.
No, it sounds like he's understandably aggravated by people buying tickets in bulk with the intention of reselling them at higher prices, and stopping people from buying them from the original source in the process.

Personally I have no problem with people doing this (there's money to be made), but don't call someone jealous because they disagree with something. What are you, 4?

recursive said,

Sounds to me like you are a little jealous of these folks making easy cash like this.

No, but this is the whole problem, some tickets are like this, others aren't. A ticket is a ticket, whether it is for Glastonbury, Google's I/O or a theme park. Should be one rule for all.

recursive said,

Sounds to me like you are a little jealous of these folks making easy cash like this.

No, don't get me wrong, I have made money from reselling tickets too I just don't understand why it is not stopped by the ticket companies, as they have nothing to gain, because in the end it is not really fair on others ...

KavazovAngel said,
"let's hope that Google or eBay do the right thing here."

What exactly is being done wrong here?

I agree, nothing wrong is being done. They bought the tickets, let them re-sell them

tHaCuBe said,

I agree, nothing wrong is being done. They bought the tickets, let them re-sell them

Scalping tickets is illegal in a lot of countries.

as long as the world is controlled by greed, money, and power then we will continue to see things like this happen again and again. these 3 things are the reason the world is in such a bad shape that it is currently in. We started this downward spiral when people started focusing more on the "me" "i" and "my" instead "we" and "us".

Vlad said,
Oh please, can we spare the rhetoric and say that some people are jerks and leave it at that?

+1

business is business yeah its a tough world, while the likes of every brand on the planet waves the next must have months, weeks or even days after the last one and everyone goes crazy for it.

We all like nice things, the people going have got the money to go so let them go - its like the Olympics that is just 20 miles from my house next year and I can't get a ticket but some kids from some school who probably don't even like PE get to go...

who cares, you got the money you get nice things.

"this is just extortionate"
No, it's called supply and demand. This isn't news. This is business as usual.
If people are willing to pay that then let them pay it.

speedstr3789 said,
"this is just extortionate"
No, it's called supply and demand. This isn't news. This is business as usual.
If people are willing to pay that then let them pay it.

So scamming people is alright? ...

No this isn't a supply and demand issue. Those who purchased the tickets obviously did so with the intent of reselling at a higher value. This is artificially inflating the demand for the product.

De.Bug said,

So scamming people is alright? ...

They are paying it because they want to. These guys want to attend Google IO so I can assume they are not so dumb that they would be scammed online.

Remote Sojourner said,

They are paying it because they want to. These guys want to attend Google IO so I can assume they are not so dumb that they would be scammed online.


Maybe they are only buying them because there is no other way to get tickets. They are still getting raked by the sellers. Therefore I would consider it a scam, on the grounds that since they are the only people selling them they just raise the prices extremely high.

De.Bug said,

Maybe they are only buying them because there is no other way to get tickets. They are still getting raked by the sellers. Therefore I would consider it a scam, on the grounds that since they are the only people selling them they just raise the prices extremely high.

er yes, which is still supply and demand dictating a price. it's not a scam.

De.Bug said,

Maybe they are only buying them because there is no other way to get tickets. They are still getting raked by the sellers. Therefore I would consider it a scam, on the grounds that since they are the only people selling them they just raise the prices extremely high.

I don not consider this a scam. People know (or at least they can find out) what the real price of a ticket is. They also can find out if there are tickets available via the official channels. And nobody forces anyone to buy these tickets. If you don't want to pay, don't go or be quicker when tickets become available.

De.Bug said,

Maybe they are only buying them because there is no other way to get tickets. They are still getting raked by the sellers. Therefore I would consider it a scam, on the grounds that since they are the only people selling them they just raise the prices extremely high.

And these tickets are a must have right? Like food, water? Nope, completely optional. If you don't want to pay the prices, don't buy the tickets, watch the webcasts and read the news.

De.Bug said,
Therefore I would consider it a scam, on the grounds that since they are the only people selling them they just raise the prices extremely high.

That's called a monopoly, not a scam. A scam is when a seller promises something in exchange for money (or something else) and doesn't deliver what was promised. If one buys a ticket at a high price (for whatever reason) and receives said ticket in return, it's not a scam. It's not nice (or morally fair, arguably), but it's not a scam.

By your logic, an airline jacking up fares at the last minute is a scammer. Add cell and cable providers with no competition in a certain area to the list too.

Edited by Yuxi, Feb 24 2011, 12:01am :