Google Nexus Q: Made in the USA!

As we previously reported, Google announced the Nexus Q hardware device today at their Google I/O developer event. The Android 4.0-powered streaming media device that looks like it came from the Portal games is now available for pre-order on the Google Play website for the price of $299. It's expected to start shipping sometime in mid-July.

The device connects to your home Wi-Fi network and, using Google Play on your Android-based smartphone or tablet, it can stream music, movies and TV shows on the service to your device. You can also connect it to speakers to stream music (via optional speakers) or you can connect it to your TV via an HDMI cable and watch Google Play movies and TV shows on the big screen.

However, the sleek design and the features may not be as important as this fact. Wired.com, in their extensive behind-the-scenes report on the Nexus Q, reports that the product was entirely designed and manufactured here in the USA (specific factories and their locations were not revealed).

Google's Joe Britt states in the article:

When you’re building stuff in China, there can be a multi-week latency between when a product is produced until when you’re actually able to evaluate it. Unless you’ve got somebody on the ground, constantly monitoring every aspect, it’s really hard to guarantee quality. You’re trusting someone 6,000 miles away.

While it's unlikely that the Nexus Q will have the kinds of sales that are seen in Apple's iPad or iPhone devices, Google certainly wants to show that a high tech consumer electronics device doesn't have to depend on being made overseas.

Source: Wired.com | Image via Google

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48 Comments

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Hope this starts a trend around the world for many companies. I might ven pay a slightly higher price for an item if I knew it was manufactured/made within the UK/USA/etc.

You don't mention design theft, which as others have posted is also a big reason some companies are moving their manufacturing back home.

Overall total costs often balance out as Chinese labor isn't as cheap as it used to be, though Chinese gov subsidies & currency manipulation often bring those costs back down. Then again a lot of stuff isn't made in the US because we no longer have the plants [factories] -- the regs to build a new one increase costs so much that they're often built in Mexico instead.

The "Buy American" theme kinda mimics the newer Chrysler ads, promoting the notion that they're made in Detroit, but it's just that, a notion. 1st off the American auto makers have moved as many plants & design facilities out of Michigan as possible -- years ago. 2nd, & this may apply to the Nexus Q as well, there's often surprisingly little domestically made content in any US auto or truck -- depending on brand/model you'll almost always find more US manufactured parts in a Honda that's built/sold here! GM [Government Motors] has far more off-shore employees than they do domestically. If it stays on the market long enough, sooner or later someone(s) will publish some sort of breakdown on the Nexus Q, e.g. does the core, more or less complete circuit board arise in the states via a container ship, how many people are employed making the Q in the US, what's their average wage etc.

That sort of info's available now on most established products/brands, but it's little read because I don't think most Americans have this fierce nationalistic attitude when it comes to the products they buy. It's more of a fan boy sort of thing where some people like whatever brand/product, in this case "Made in U.S.A." -- you don't argue with a fan boy unless you're enjoying arguing.

Well, I'm not a Google fan, but I actually really commend them for this. It's not pretty, but I like the idea of buying an American made device, even if it is a little more expensive.

THolman said,
Well, I'm not a Google fan, but I actually really commend them for this. It's not pretty, but I like the idea of buying an American made device, even if it is a little more expensive.

3x is only a "little" more?

They should be rewarded for their efforts to keep everything clean energy and in-house, despite cost etc!! Gj Google!

Shahrad said,
They should be rewarded for their efforts to keep everything clean energy and in-house, despite cost etc!! Gj Google!

Nice sentiment, but it's often worthwhile to dig a bit deeper, for example what's the source of the rare earth metals etc. that go into the electronics?

if you make this in China there will be an immediate clone out from some government supported electronics producer over there. and it will be 1/4 the price.

the420kid said,
if you make this in China there will be an immediate clone out from some government supported electronics producer over there. and it will be 1/4 the price.

Maybe -- maybe not...

The Dyson fan clones I've seen are close to the price of the original on sale. Could be that the people who'd consider buying the Q wouldn't consider buying something similar at a reduced price, while those inclined to buy cheaper clones wouldn't consider the whole Q concept to begin with. Asian-based manufacturers know this, & while they may bring very cheap but ill-considered products to market, they're much more careful with the not-so-cheap stuff.

Ryoken said,
$5 says this was ASSEMBLED in the USA, not Manufactured in the USA..
"reports that the product was entirely designed and manufactured here in the USA "

cybertimber2008 said,
"reports that the product was entirely designed and manufactured here in the USA "
Except for the chips inside

Ryoken said,
$5 says this was ASSEMBLED in the USA, not Manufactured in the USA..
Still more American than Apple, hater.

"Unless you've got somebody on the ground, constantly monitoring every aspect, it's really hard to guarantee quality. You're trusting someone 6,000 miles away." Sounds like they are as scared as the government about the Chinese slipping in a few extras.

xendrome said,
$299 that thing is never going to sell....

Maybe - maybe not.

It's one thing to make a very cheap but ill considered product, putting it on the market, but another entirely when you're talking the $100+ range for electronics. I'm sure Google tried to do their homework, arriving at that $300 mark for what they feel are very good reasons -- maybe for once they're right? History would suggest otherwise, that you're correct, but who knows?

Maybe Google itself half expects the Q to fail? At $300 it does generate a lot of talk, a lot of publicity, & if that inspires a bunch of cheap DLNA devices that do basically the same things, Google still wins, with a lot more people streaming from Google Play. And if the concept's a dud, well Google's known for experimenting, so what's the big deal with one more attempt that didn't pan out -- by now it would hardly raise an eyebrow.

mikiem said,

Maybe - maybe not.

It's one thing to make a very cheap but ill considered product, putting it on the market, but another entirely when you're talking the $100+ range for electronics. I'm sure Google tried to do their homework, arriving at that $300 mark for what they feel are very good reasons -- maybe for once they're right? History would suggest otherwise, that you're correct, but who knows?

Maybe Google itself half expects the Q to fail? At $300 it does generate a lot of talk, a lot of publicity, & if that inspires a bunch of cheap DLNA devices that do basically the same things, Google still wins, with a lot more people streaming from Google Play. And if the concept's a dud, well Google's known for experimenting, so what's the big deal with one more attempt that didn't pan out -- by now it would hardly raise an eyebrow.

^This

except off course all electronic components are made in china and only assembled in the US from a pice of plastic americans managed to make.

neonspark said,
except off course all electronic components are made in china and only assembled in the US from a pice of plastic americans managed to make.

Such a hater..............................

neonspark said,
except off course all electronic components are made in china and only assembled in the US from a pice of plastic americans managed to make.

Really?

Then I wonder why the iPhone & iPad CPU is manufactured in Texas, USA. Intel also manufacturers many chips in the USA as well as PNY and Micron building RAM in the USA. Among others...

neonspark said,
except off course all electronic components are made in china and only assembled in the US from a pice of plastic americans managed to make.

i think they mentioned the components or the PCB or something being american as well. idk.

Frazell Thomas said,

Really?

Then I wonder why the iPhone & iPad CPU is manufactured in Texas, USA. Intel also manufacturers many chips in the USA as well as PNY and Micron building RAM in the USA. Among others...

Yes we know. The CPU which is made by Samsung who has a plant in Texas. Samsung happens to be more of an American company than Apple (who claims to be American). I still find it funny that iFans go around screaming that Apple is American when it says "Made in China" on the back of all their products.

Yeah right, they're only doing it so they can stamp "Made in USA" sticker on it. But that term isn't what it used to be since the 60s.

The reason it's $299 is because it is made in the US. The US environment is so bad now that it takes 3 times as much to produce something that can be done for $50 in Taiwan and even less in China.

If Apple TV can be have for $99 dollars, what kind of US citizen would throw money at this thing? We'll see if those patriot will put money where there mouth is. I know I won't.

flexkeyboard said,
The reason it's $299 is because it is made in the US. The US environment is so bad now that it takes 3 times as much to produce something that can be done for $50 in Taiwan and even less in China.

Yeah well duh... Wages tend to be much higher in the Western world.

.Neo said,

Yeah well duh... Wages tend to be much higher in the Western world.
the problem is that people are not willing to pay more for products made in the US.

Rudy said,
the problem is that people are not willing to pay more for products made in the US.

I love this argument. Just kidding, I think it's stupid. You can speak for EVERY SINGLE PERSON?? Why don't you talk to my family or some of my friends that would gladly spend more money on a product that was made in my country. They (and I) would rather have the money stay here, in the US. But please, go on about how NO ONE would pay more. Please.

Open Minded said,

I love this argument. Just kidding, I think it's stupid. You can speak for EVERY SINGLE PERSON?? Why don't you talk to my family or some of my friends that would gladly spend more money on a product that was made in my country. They (and I) would rather have the money stay here, in the US. But please, go on about how NO ONE would pay more. Please.

Relax. He didn't specify whether it was all people or some people, only "people" was specified. From what I've observed, __most__ people aim to by the cheapest product they can get without sacrificing the features they want. Some people take location into consideration, but observation of the market says otherwise.

Open Minded said,

I love this argument. Just kidding, I think it's stupid. You can speak for EVERY SINGLE PERSON?? Why don't you talk to my family or some of my friends that would gladly spend more money on a product that was made in my country. They (and I) would rather have the money stay here, in the US. But please, go on about how NO ONE would pay more. Please.

Relax. He didn't specify whether it was all people or some people, only "people" was specified. From what I've observed, most people aim to by the cheapest product they can get without sacrificing the features they want. Some people take location into consideration, but observation of the market says otherwise.

.Neo said,

Yeah well duh... Wages tend to be much higher in the Western world.

Not just wages, benefits as well, and American factories have to abide by much stronger environmental protection rules which even further increases costs.

Rudy said,
the problem is that people are not willing to pay more for products made in the US.

I'm willing to pay more for products made in the U.S. but not 3x more. I'm not even willing to pay double. I'd happily pay like 20% more though but I don't know how representative I am of the populace in general. I suspect that most people just but whatever is cheapest with no concern of where it comes from. The "Made in the USA" thing is nice and all but unfortunately I think this thing is going to bomb because of the high price.