Google: No minimum processor requirement for Honeycomb

Rumours of devices being left behind to gather dust as the Android platform charges ever forward seem to follow each and every update to Google's mobile OS - and Android 3.0 ''Honeycomb'' is no exception.

Even before Google accidentally outed the new, ''Entirely for Tablets'' mobile OS, PCMag was on the case, citing the managing director of a Korean electronics firm who claimed Honeycomb would not run on anything less than a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor.

Two days later, ZDNet's Christopher Dawson added fuel to the fire, citing ''reports from hardware manufacturers out of this week’s Consumer Electronics Show'' confirming that a dual-core processor would be the absolute minimum for devices looking to get a taste of Google's latest sweet-themed offering.

''What about the Samsung Galaxy Tab or those cheap Chinese tablets that tech junkies have grabbed up as disposable iPad alternatives? They’re stuck at Android 2.3 if they’re lucky enough to get a system update or savvy enough to root the device and upgrade themselves,'' he said.

Perhaps sensing the same sort of rumour-storm that built up following the release of Android 2.3 ''Gingerbread'' for phones, Android Open-Source & Compatibility Program Manager Dan Morrill weighed in - or rather, tweeted in - earlier today and put any fears of a dual-core minimum to rest.

'"Random note: there's no hard minimum processor requirement for Honeycomb. Trust me, if there were I'd know,'' he wrote.

While there's still no word on any other hardware requirements for Honeycomb, Samsung Galaxy Tab owners should be able to breathe easy - for the moment, at least.

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There absolutely is some minimum proc req. He might not have known off-hand or perhaps it hasn't been settled on but believe me, there is a min req.

Soulsiphon said,
There absolutely is some minimum proc req. He might not have known off-hand or perhaps it hasn't been settled on but believe me, there is a min req.

yes there's a minimum requirement for enjoying it but nothing hardcoded like Windows check before the install.

There's one huge reason for it.
Supporting different class of CPU also mean different optimisation of CPU.

If you are old enough just remember what was the reason why AMD named their CPU for example Athlon XP 3000+ and run at 2.1Ghz

Hard requirement? Unlikely, but a soft one? You bet. When you consider the number of tablets that are going to be running on a Tegra 2 SoC, using anything less is fooling yourself when you consider that 90% of developers are going to target THAT platform, and not something running with a single-core chip (at least that's what I'd do). And besides the Samsung Galaxy Tab, I doubt any other manufacturer really wants to spend the time and energy making Honeycomb work on their tablet (having specs lower than the reference platform invites pain and suffering on your users).

Nice, the next question is how will it perform on current devices? As there is no minimum requirement, that means it should run on any device currently being sold, the only question is how well will it perform.

Nagisan said,
Nice, the next question is how will it perform on current devices? As there is no minimum requirement, that means it should run on any device currently being sold, the only question is how well will it perform.

as fast as an iPhone 3G with iOS 4.2

seriously Honeycomb being for tablet most of the tablet in android are chinese cheap one.
Chinese tablet dosen't have a lot of update if any..
there's mostly one real tablet for now and it's the Galaxy Tab wich is single core but 1GhZ hummingbird cpu. There's a lot of sign that Galaxy Tab will have Honeycomb from Samsung and for the most part HoneyComb is Gingerbread with redesigned app for higher resolution with a browser that look closer of a android port of Chrome.

for the CPU part single core cpu will run smooth as a dual core do most of the time, however it will use more energy than dual core one at idle.
Multi-core CPU have one big advantage and it's multitasking during CPU-intensive task.