Google releases 64-bit Chrome beta for Windows 7 and 8

It's been a couple of months since Google announced a 64-bit version of its Chrome browser, although it was released only in Canary and Developer editions. As with any early release of new software, installing it would have meant potentially dealing with the bugs and glitches still waiting to be fixed. 

Windows users keen to try out the 64-bit browser may be interested to learn that Google has now released a more stable build, although it still remains in beta for now. It supports both Windows 7 and 8.x, and if you're upgrading from one of the earlier versions, the beta will replace the Developer or Canary build, while still keeping your settings and bookmarks. 

As Engadget notes, the 64-bit version is intended to make better use of your system's resources to offer a richer, faster and more secure web experience. It's taken just eight weeks to get from the earliest release to the beta, so the odds are good that the full and final version isn't too far away - good news if you're still hesitant about installing a pre-release version on your system. 

Full details of the latest additions and improvements in the beta are available in the SVN log

Source: Google via Engadget

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There is a 64-bit version of Firefox available, but it's only in alpha stage. Plus, the only major benefit 64-bit versions of Firefox have is allowing the browser to use more than 4GB ram.

a7omic said,
There is a 64-bit version of Firefox available, but it's only in alpha stage. Plus, the only major benefit 64-bit versions of Firefox have is allowing the browser to use more than 4GB ram.

Mozilla is a disappointment. Only recently h264 support, poor HWA, no modern CPU support, no RT support.

_Alexander said,

Mozilla is a disappointment. Only recently h264 support, poor HWA, no modern CPU support, no RT support.

Really?
>1< Chrome refuses to work with OneDrive/Office 365, Adoe Connect #justsaying
>2< Chrome stores your saved password without protection. Though you shouldn't in the first place try on any browser
>3< Chrome is a CPU hog but RAM friendly
>4< It's Scroogle, if you care

Firefox x64 only benefits from 4gb ram and it's a forked project if i'm correct.

No for 64-bit Chrome they'll only support Webrtc. Webrtc for web services that use GoogleTalk is coming. If you need GoogleTalk in the mean time stick with 32-bit Chrome.

have you tried running it on 4gigs? its still slow. and btw even if i have 128GB RAM i would still prefer more efficient programs.

Have had zero issues with 4GB, have several workstations with only 4 that run it just fine (as long as something else isn't gobbling up that 4GB), although I wouldn't want to try it on two or less.. that's the price of performance and stability, all those processes have overhead and that adds up. If you're hurting for memory though then yea, Chrome isn't for you, for me Firefox typically runs ~400-500MB tops, IE even less, although I've read that Firefox is working on a multi-process model too, that's going to do the same to their memory usage as well when that happens.

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