Google sends out invites for Android event

Android 4.3 is on the horizon, and now, Google have sent out invites to the press and investors for a 'breakfast' with Sundar Pichai, who oversees both Android and Chrome.

Starting at 9:00am PST, the event will be live streamed on YouTube for all to watch, as we expect a new version of Android to be officially announced and rolled out to Nexus devices. This update is seen to be one of Google's worst kept secrets, as some users have already received it on the Google Play edition versions of the Samsung Galaxy S4. The minor update, which is the third version of Android Jelly Bean, will arrive as Google readies Android 5.0 which may be released later this year. A new camera interface, support for Bluetooth LE and new advanced Wi-Fi settings are three headline features we should see at the event which Android Central revealed.

Updates to Chrome are also probable, which may bring Android features to the Chromebook, and vice versa. Pichai took up the role of head of Android this May, after previously leading only Chrome, replacing the established and experienced Andy Rubin. This will be the first update to Android under his lead.

Source: Android Central

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11 Comments

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iOS,iOS,all the way!
I would buy an iphone, but it's to expensive.
Waiting to the cheap iphone,or im moving to Windows Phone.
Android? Never!!

4.3? Too bad. As a WP fan I'm interested to see Android 5.0. Right now WP8 is great but whether its a keeper depends on how fast the competition can improve.

The number itself doesn't matter but the meaning behind the number does. 4.3 is a minor upgrade. I'm looking forward to see the next big thing for Android.

Ronnet said,
The number itself doesn't matter but the meaning behind the number does. 4.3 is a minor upgrade. I'm looking forward to see the next big thing for Android.

Google's not in a hurry to rush an unfinished 5.0 out the door because of the lack meaningful innovation from their competitors. The next iOS is stalled, and WinPhone looks like it'll just limp along with boring Metro for years to come so Google has time to do 5.0 right.

daveyjones said,

Google's not in a hurry to rush an unfinished 5.0 out the door because of the lack meaningful innovation from their competitors. The next iOS is stalled, and WinPhone looks like it'll just limp along with boring Metro for years to come so Google has time to do 5.0 right.

You're not Google so you can't be sure of that. So I'm not going to take your word on that. I'm interested to see at what speed Google does improve its OS. For Microsoft's sake I hope you're right. They are taking way too long. If I were Google I would see this as an opportunity to proof to people such as myself that they are a better option.

As for Metro, that is your opinion. I strongly disagree. I love the concept although I find it disappointing that the execution is different on Windows and WP. It feel fragmented. I had the same issue with Android but if things don't improve then I might as well go back to Android. Same issue but better apps (at this point I don't miss any apps on Windows Phone, its just that they lack updates).

Ronnet said,
As for Metro, that is your opinion. I strongly disagree. I love the concept although I find it disappointing that the execution is different on Windows and WP. It feel fragmented. I had the same issue with Android but if things don't improve then I might as well go back to Android. Same issue but better apps (at this point I don't miss any apps on Windows Phone, its just that they lack updates).

Just want to make sure you understand something here. How is it fragmented? Is this a word you picked up on from sites like this or do you not understand what fragmentation is?

1) Software Fragmentation
When you say Android is fragmented be careful how you say that. To Googler's who work on Android, it is the vanilla version which is almost always kept up to date.

Comparing the Samsung Galaxy S4 to the Samsung Galaxy S4 Google Play edition you'll see what you would call "fragmentation". It isn't. Look at the major players here. Samsung, HTC, LG and Google. Samsung uses TouchWiz, HTC uses Sense, LG has their own and Google (Nexus Line / Google Play edition line uses stock).

2) Manufacturer / Carrier Fragmentation
Manufacturers tend to omit or add different technologies to their phones. For example, the Samsung Galaxy S III uses a different type of NFC technology that the Nexus 4 uses. The Samsung Galaxy S4 and HTC One don't have photosphere (I am not talking about the Google Play editions).

3) Hardware
Older phones simply will not get the latest and greatest. The HTC Thunderbolt was upgraded to Android 4.0 a few months ago. It is a single core phone and it ran better with Android 2.3. The phone is over two years old now and there are no plans to bring it to 4.2.x/4.3. Also it lacks Bluetooth 4.0 and NFC. Thus it is fragmented.

Fragmentation on Android is simply an overused, little understood negative connotation. My Atom processor which runs Windows 7 can't run Crisis. Windows 8 RT can't install legacy programs. Is Windows fragmented? Or is the hardware limiting its functionality. Bottom line, if you buy a flagship device from a big manufacturer, you won't have to worry as much about certain kinds of fragmentation.