Google Shareholders Vote Against Anti-Censorship Proposal

A majority of Google shareholders have voted against an anti-censorship proposal that took aim at the way Google conducts its business in China and other countries that engage in active censorship. The company received a large amount of criticism last year on news that its Chinese search engine, Google.cn, engages in self-censorship. The proposal would have required that the search giant not engage in self-censorship of its products and that the company clearly disclose when any censorship had occurred.

In response, David Drummond, senior vice president for corporate development, retorted that "this proposal would prevent us from operating Google.cn. Pulling out of China, shutting down Google.cn, is just not the right thing to do at this point. But that's exactly what this proposal would do." The company's board of directors had recommended that shareholders vote against the proposal - and they agreed. Simply put, the proposal failed spectacularly.

View: Proposal
News source: PC World

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20 Comments

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Do No Evil meets the reality of publically traded companies.
The reality is that stockholders as a group tend to be evil.
Profits are more important than ethics any day.

This is so retarded! You people protesting google's censorship in China are _R_E_T_A_R_D_E_D_!!!! The GOVERNMENT censors the internet in China, you either play along, or you're gone, get it? No censorship = no Google. How does that help ANYONE??? It DOSEN'T!! The people of China should be allowed to search the internet any way they want, and if you are so mad about the censorship then do something to fight or change the Chinese government and not Google, which is just a search engine and not an army of the lord sent to free China from the bonds of intellectual slavery.
Another user said :
> Doing business in a country means you have to abide by the laws there.

That's it...

hapbt said,
This is so retarded! You people protesting google's censorship in China are _R_E_T_A_R_D_E_D_!!!!

How much does the Chinese government pay you? I guess not too much since China is still a developing country, lol.

chilliadus said,

How much does the Chinese government pay you? I guess not too much since China is still a developing country, lol.

hapbt is right, though. You guys are pretty retarded if you don't play by the rules and refuse to believe reality. Sure, we can all imagine the world where everyone is equal, human rights are perfect and untouched, etc., but unless you spend time and effort in becoming an activist against the poor state of affairs of human rights, you've got no right to complain. In the end, Google is the only one that has something to lose, not you.

To have some Google, or not to Google at all. I think it does no harm in having an accessible Google service in China. Sure it's not ideal and non-censored content is better, but any content is better than no content at all.

I don't see the problem here?

Google wants to run their search engine in China.
China forces censorship on the search engine...as it does everything else.

So what's the problem exactly?

timmmay said,
I don't see the problem here?

Google wants to run their search engine in China.
China forces censorship on the search engine...as it does everything else.

So what's the problem exactly?

Maybe some people don't like censorship?

Computer Guru said,
You're supposed to live by your own moral standards - not by those of others.

So? He obviously lives by his standards, not yours or mine, lol.

Who knows, nobody really cares that Yahoo or MS do the same thing.

And don't forget Yahoo gave the Chinese government information on people that landed them in jail.

tao muon said,
So, they voted against an 'anti-censorship' proposal....
That basically means they are in favor of censorship?

No, they're in favor of making money no matter what.

What's better for the people of china, no google at all, or a censored google? uncensored google isn't a choice. taking google away just takes away one of the channels the chinese peopel have of getting information

When was being principled ever good for the bottom line?

Easy decision, no income in China or "censor" money.

neufuse said,
this is what happens when you go public, its all about the money not about the rights

What rights? It isn't Google restricting rights its the Chinese government ... shockingly Google isn't stronger than a communist regime.

Although if every American stopped shopping at Walmart, there might be some improvement in China.

SimpleRules said,
When was being principled ever good for the bottom line?

Easy decision, no income in China or "censor" money.

What rights? It isn't Google restricting rights its the Chinese government ... shockingly Google isn't stronger than a communist regime.

Although if every American stopped shopping at Walmart, there might be some improvement in China.

Walmart factories in China are indeed sweat factories in our eyes, but their workers are treated well above local average. While I don't like Google's self-censorship, I understand that they're running a business, and I have no problem with that if they just officially renounce the misleading "do no evil".