Hackers accessed information from 200,000 Citi cardholders

In recent months, hackers have been targeting high profile institutions in society. The most prominent target of the bunch are Sony and its properties, starting from the PlayStation Network breach and continuing with attacks on Sony Music, Sony Pictures, and brands affiliated with Sony. Other targets include governments, car manufacturers, financial institutions, online cloud services - the list goes on.

Some of these attacks have a rather humourous slant. Unfortunately, most of these attacks are of malicious intent, with personally identifiable information stolen. And that is what Citigroup discovered recently - hackers managed to break into their internal network and access the records of 200,000 cardholders. That amounts to about 1% of North American Citi customers, which amount to 21 million.

According to Reuters, Citigroup claims the hackers managed to access the names of customers, account numbers, and contact information including email addresses. Sensitive information such as birth dates, social security numbers, card expiration dates, and credit card security codes were not stolen or accessed.

A Citigroup spokesperson has assured Reuters that affected customers will be contacted via email, though they stopped short of explaining how the breach occurred. However, much like what Sony is currently experiencing, the bank may have to address criticism of not immediately informing customers of a data breach, as was the case for Sony.

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LOL there is nothing wrong with hackers, what's wrong with these big companies where their IT departments are run by monkeys. Come man, unencrypted passwords, outdated webservers, zero contingency plans, no common sense when protecting and storing the data, and the list go on. Multimillion companies which we are supposed to trust run my monkeys, this is just awesome!!!!!!! Keep them coming.

Cocoliso said,
LOL there is nothing wrong with hackers, what's wrong with these big companies where their IT departments are run by monkeys. Come man, unencrypted passwords, outdated webservers, zero contingency plans, no common sense when protecting and storing the data, and the list go on. Multimillion companies which we are supposed to trust run my monkeys, this is just awesome!!!!!!! Keep them coming.

So by your logic it's OK to steal from someone who forgets to lock his door.

There's a huge difference between someone who tests the boundaries of security and people who steal information to commit fraud and other crimes. It's pretty clear you're under 18; your opinion of this kind of bull**** will change when your balls drop and you discover you can't buy a car or a house because someone has ruined your credit.

My fiance's mother works as a Manager in the credit card dept. at Citibank headquarters in Tampa, FL. She has been very stressed out over this the past few days and declines to release any further information about it. I'm assuming there is more affected than described.

This is nothing new, companies have been getting hacked all the time, it just seems they are actually telling customers about it now for some odd reason.

xbamaris said,
@shakey neither did Citi fyi...

"According to Reuters, Citigroup claims the hackers managed to access the names of customers, account numbers, and contact information including email addresses. Sensitive information such as birth dates, social security numbers, card expiration dates, and credit card security codes were not stolen or accessed."

Directly from the article. Though other articles have said that they are unsure if they were. It is still up in the air, but still, something that is much more damaging than any other type of info leaked. Once someone has your social, that's it. Nothing you can do, everything they can.

When Sony gets hacked, everyone blames Sony and says they failed, and praises the hackers.... well, its spreading. Every business and government agency is failing, but looks like those who supported the Sony hackers might be getting a taste of what others are... at least Sony didn't lose social security numbers.
These hackers are some very low humans.

Citibank didn't lose social security numbers either. They also only lost details for 1% of their customers.

hdca18 said,
This is ****in scary man. Everyday theres a new case. WTf is wrong with security these days.

No, wtf is wrong with hackers these days. People could go around with guns shooting each other, but they don't. However, hackers go guns blazing and attack all the companies they can. It's the hackers, not the security.

andrewbares said,

No, wtf is wrong with hackers these days. People could go around with guns shooting each other, but they don't. However, hackers go guns blazing and attack all the companies they can. It's the hackers, not the security.

So if I bank left their door open overnight, and someone was curious enough to try and open it while walking past, it's the guy who was walking past's fault that he stole all that money? Or is it the banks fault for not locking the door in the first place?