Halo 4 creative director departs Microsoft

Even though Halo 4 is at least a year away from its release, Microsoft's next game in the popular Xbox 360 shooter series is already losing one of its major creative forces. Kotaku reports that Ryan Payton, one of the creative directors behind Halo 4, has revealed he has left Microsoft and its internal game studio 343 Industries. Payton said his decision to leave the company was due to the fact that he "wasn't creatively excited about the project anymore."

Payton is candid about his decision to leave the company and the development of Halo 4 from his perspective. While Halo 4 itself may turn out to be a great continuation of the series, it's clear that Payton had ideas that didn't mesh with what the rest of the team wanted to do. He states, "The Halo I wanted to build was fundamentally different and I don't think I had built enough credibility to see such a crazy endeavor through."

Payton came to Microsoft and 343 Industries from Japan in 2008. Previously he worked at Kojima Productions on developing the third person action game Metal Gear Solid 4. He has already announced his post-Microsoft plans; he has launched a new game development studio, Camouflaj. The studio is already at work on two games but details of those projects were not announced.

Halo 4 is the first game in the Halo shooter series that won't have any input from the game's original creators Bungie, who left the franchise behind with the release in 2010 of Halo: Reach. 343 Industries is scheduled to release Halo 4 for the Xbox 360 in late 2012.

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14 Comments

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why can't they make these games but call them something different? i know they have a fan base and want to keep them buying but they can just make a different title and tell the fans that it's just like halo.

bring the damn games for the fing PC man, stop bs-ing the devel of halo on 360 only ... the more they f-up the game the less sales they'll make

zeta_immersion said,
bring the damn games for the fing PC man, stop bs-ing the devel of halo on 360 only ... the more they f-up the game the less sales they'll make

they are selling xboxes by keeping halo 360 only. why would they ever bring it to the PC where it will get pirated and lose it's exclusivity?

zeta_immersion said,
bring the damn games for the fing PC man, stop bs-ing the devel of halo on 360 only ... the more they f-up the game the less sales they'll make

Halo used all the features of the XBox 360 DirectX version that was built around the Xenos GPU.

The PC version of DirectX 10 (thanks to Nividia's whining) did not equal the feature set of the XBox 360's version until DX11 and Windows 7 was released. And it has taken some time for DX11 hardware to become more common in the PC world.

So look for Halo on the PC, but don't be shocked when it requires a DX11 video card and Windows 7.

Side note...

Non-engineer/science level geeks don't realize how unique the Xenos GPU in the XBox 360 was, and what it established to the computing and gaming industry as a whole. Even at the time the Xenos was hitting production, ATI didn't think the Microsoft Xenos design was 'good' as a GPU model for gaming, and didn't adopt the design until a full product cycle later than they could have done. The game developers working on XBox titles confirmed what Microsoft knew about the design and then convinced ATI and also NVidia this was the future for GPU architectures, breaking from the previous generation.

Xenos brought a lot to the computing world, like the unified shader model and how stream processing was handled, the new onboard DMA, and changes in BUS access and even thread scheduling control. Ironically, things not MIcrosoft like CUDA 2.x and OpenCL would not exist as they do without the Microsoft designed Xenos architecture.

(The Xenos architecture is also what allows Windows 7 (and somewhat Vista) to preemptively multi-task GPU threads, virtualize VRAM, and hand off SMP functionality to the OS, and get away from Crossfire/SLI concepts.)

343 Industries will take Halo forward, ODST and Halo Wars weren't so good just average games. I'm not sure but I think 343 Industries did have some input on Halo Reach which was a step up imo.

Gaffney said,
343 Industries will take Halo forward, ODST and Halo Wars weren't so good just average games. I'm not sure but I think 343 Industries did have some input on Halo Reach which was a step up imo.

Erm dunno how Halo Wars even enters the debate, not being developed by Bungie or 343...

etempest said,
Bungie split with Microsoft due to growing creative differences with Microsoft.

They split to do things other than Halo, PERIOD.

They had always wanted to do more than just Halo, but because of the success of the franchise, they got locked into a single game.

Bungie developed Halo Reach, AFTER they left Microsoft, and for some reason people forget this part.

Also 'leaving' Microsoft is less dramatic than it really sounds. They went back to their own studios and work on whatever title they want, even refusing to work on Halo if they want, which they did for the 10year anniversary and the upcoming Halo 4.

Microsoft still owns part of Bungie, so they have an investor to fall back on, that hasn't changed.