Hands On: Technicolor 3D TV with no glasses

Hidden deep within the booths of CES is a little talked about technology from Technicolor that allows for 3D TV without wearing any glasses. The technology, surprisingly, is actually two years old but is just now making headlines as 3D TV is being pushed hard by the major TV manufactures.

The details are slim but it works by placing a special lens on top of the screen as well as placing pixels in precise positions to achieve the desired effect. The end result is a 3D effect without wearing any glasses but there are some major drawbacks.

While the set does produce a 3D effect, the end result isn't as clear or as 3D as the competing formats that require glasses. The picture, unless you're sitting in the optimal viewing zone, can appear slightly fuzzy or blurry. Also, an optimal distance must be maintained to achieve a maximum 3D effect but if you're to close you will feel nauseated watching the TV and if you are beyond the optimal zone then the 3D effect diminishes.

Overall it's a good step in the right direction but there is still a long way to go for this technology to be adopted in mass. Hopefully Technicolor will continue to work on this technology because if they can get to work on the known issues, the technology could make 3D TV without glasses a real possibility.

Note: It's impossible to replicate the 3D in video or images as this technology is based on Stereoscopic (3D Stereo).

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This is just the latest gotta have thing till the next gotta have thing comes out.By the time its all said and done it wont even be close to this at all so why waste money on the transitional BS

you'd need to present a different image to each eye, somehow... youtube already has a 'crosseye' function for 3d films, its slightly uncomfortable but it works

I am really excited that they're seriously innovating with 3D television, any innovation that develops the technology is welcome. While I am really really excited about the prospects the current problem with living room 3D is that it's all too conditional at the moment.

I find it more acceptable to wear special glasses at the movies because I am outside of my comfort zone, I've driven to a cinema, I am sitting in a foreign seat, in a room that is not mine, amongst total strangers (and friends too of course) with my pack of Peanut M&M's. Adding the requirement to also wear 3D glasses isn't too much of an issue because I've already gone to all this effort anyway.

At home I expect to be comfortable and I think that having to wear a pair of glasses (that will cost $50 for shutter ones) will encroach on that comfort, so would having to sit in a special position in front of the TV. With this technology if I were to get up and move to another part of the room the TV will go blurry.

For me personally, 3D TV will only work if it is natural, I would expect to be able to relax in front of the TV and be able to watch it in 3D without any special conditions that might reduce my comfort levels.

Sure at the moment the technology to deliver natural 'catch-less' 3D doesn't exist at the moment, and some people might say "are you crazy, what you're proposing is impossible!". To that I'd say that one thing past advances in technology has taught me is that seemingly impossible things end up becoming not only possible, but also mainstream. I hope this is the goal that TV companies are aiming for with their vision for 3D television.

I can see some slight 3d depth to it for instance the mouth looks like the different depths a real face has and the arm in the other picture looks like you can see the curvature of it. Not bad but no where near as effective as being "punched in the face" so to speak.

im sorry but that's just what the movie looks like in 2d ... the 'different depths' are just artistic styles meant to accentuate depth

what the youtube video shows is effectively if the scene of the movie was shot in one particular direction, corresponding to one of your eyes...

By its very nature, this kind of technology cuts the horizontal resolution of the display in half, at best.

The only way it could ever work is with MEMS lenses and a sophisticated tracking system. Even then, getting it to work for more than one person at a time would be difficult.

i thought the way it worked was like, dividing the viewing angle into different sections , and using different sets of pixels to generate a different image for each of those sections...
you are supposed to have each eye in a different section to perceive the 3d effect

Sounds cool and all but I'm still not buying another TV just to get 3D, just not worth it honestly. Maybe 5 or so years down the track when 3D is more mainstream and there are alot of 3D movies etc might consider it then

Xerxes said,
Maybe 5 or so years down the track when 3D is more mainstream and there are alot of 3D movies etc might consider it then :)

The Cell TV I've read about here states that it can convert any 2D source to 3D in Real time. I wonder why you thought both ends needed to be 3D. Remember earlier on when people thought they were watching HD even though it had the logo of HD on an SD channel with analog connections to the TV? Similar confusion is going to occur, I know it!!!

Karo - 323z IT said,
The Cell TV I've read about here states that it can convert any 2D source to 3D in Real time. I wonder why you thought both ends needed to be 3D. Remember earlier on when people thought they were watching HD even though it had the logo of HD on an SD channel with analog connections to the TV? Similar confusion is going to occur, I know it!!!

I saw this technology being prototyped a couple years ago in NYC. My friend worked for a company that had some stakes in it and was playing around with what they could do. Unfortunately this type of TV requires 3D media. It won't convert a 2D picture into 3D. When I first saw it I was told they weren't even thinking of marketing it as a mainstream TV. They were planning on using it for small scale factors. One example they gave me was tying it into slot machines at a casino. When you win the screen would actually jump out at you telling you so. Was really a cool idea. But I doubt it'll go mainstream as far as your actual living room TV.

PureLegend said,
Toshiba's (and I think Sony's) will.

I just meant this TV's technology. The others are far better for mainstream TV use.

PureLegend said,
Toshiba's (and I think Sony's) will.

That's not possible. A normal video stream doesn't contain any depth information, you need two video streams to capture this. Claiming to be able to convert 2D content into 3D is like Creative's 24-bit Crystaliser or playing SD content on a HD screen and claiming it to be 1080p.

wnejraud said,
That's not possible. A normal video stream doesn't contain any depth information, you need two video streams to capture this. Claiming to be able to convert 2D content into 3D is like Creative's 24-bit Crystaliser or playing SD content on a HD screen and claiming it to be 1080p.

you dont need to recreate 3d, you just have to make the viewers dizzy enough to believe that they are watching 3d