Hollywood plots a new DRM plan for "HD media ownership"

Have no particular issues with storing and moving HD multimedia contents across your computers and mobile devices? Soon you will have some, and Hollywood has just decided to “help” you with a new DRM scheme that will enable an easy way to “buy, store and playback HD versions of movies and TV shows at home or on-the-go, easily and seamlessly”.

Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, SanDisk and Western Digital formed the new Secure Content Storage Association (SCSA), with the sole plan of developing and marketing the DRM scheme under the working title of “Project Phenix”.

Protected by the Project Phenix wings, the SCSA states, users will be able to access “secure high definition and other premium copyright-protected content” on local storage (HDD, SDD) and portable devices (USB pendrives, SD memory cards).

When a user downloads a “secured” content on a local storage unit, the SCSA says, that content will be accessible “on-line and off-line” on any “SCSA-enabled” (ie Hollywood-approved) device like IPTVs, Blu-ray players, tablets, smartphones and game consoles. The new DRM scheme will work together with the UltraViolet (UV) ecosystem, another content protection mechanism designed to let users backup their digital purchased media on a finite number of digital devices.

Needless to say, the Hollywood bandwagon is pretty much excited about the Phenix Project: “Through the SCSA”, Warner Bros. Technical Operations president Darcy Antonellis said, “we will accelerate the development of products that will make it easy for the consumer to download, store and playback their high definition digital movies and TV shows, in full 1080p, on any SCSA-optimized device at home and on the go”. Talking about a real revolution here...

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows 8 third party logo contest enters final stage

Next Story

EU: Google's new privacy policy breaks European laws

25 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Everyone misspells it because its not spelled like it sounds. Its the same with any word with silent letters in it.

You know... there's a "REPORT A PROBLEM WITH THIS ARTICLE" button don't you?
Plus, if you search for Project Phenix then you'll find most other reports have also mis-spelt it. Maybe... just maybe it's supposed to be spelt that way?

Mr Spoon said,
You know... there's a "REPORT A PROBLEM WITH THIS ARTICLE" button don't you?
Plus, if you search for Project Phenix then you'll find most other reports have also mis-spelt it. Maybe... just maybe it's supposed to be spelt that way?

They did not mean the article, the author of the article or anything on Neowin. But the people who decided to call their project for Phenix.
They are having trouble trusting people who spell their project weird.

Another useless DRM thing. It will be hacked soon after it's released. When will they ever give up on DRM. It never works. It's always cracked.

KomaWeiss said,
Another useless DRM thing. It will be hacked soon after it's released. When will they ever give up on DRM. It never works. It's always cracked.

It is like the door locks on your car, it doesn't keep professional criminals out, it keeps the average person from becoming a criminal and stealing your car or stuff inside your car.

The same can be said of computer security to any other 'security' measure in the world going back throughout history.

thenetavenger said,

It is like the door locks on your car, it doesn't keep professional criminals out, it keeps the average person from becoming a criminal and stealing your car or stuff inside your car.
.
The same can be said of computer security to any other 'security' measure in the world going back throughout history.

That's a flawed analogy. If a professional bypasses the security system on your car it has no effect on the average person or their ability to steal your car. In the digital world, the majority of people pirating don't even now what DRM stands for, much less how to crack it. They don't need to know it. All they need to know is that the "free" version they downloaded from the interwebs can be played back on any device they own and doesn't force copyright notices and previews down their throat before they get to the featured presentation. So the average persons role is deciding between paying for a movie and being restricted as to where they can watch it or downloading the movie fo no cost that has no limitations. New bows and fancy wrapping paper don't make the restrictions any more appealing

Why is this such a problem? Isn't what everyone's been asking for?

Also, "Hollywood" is not only profiting from movies. Think of the very normal people working in every link of the chain of production, most of them will never even appear on the "credits".

Doctor Neurus said,
Why is this such a problem? Isn't what everyone's been asking for?
Yeah man! I've been BEGGING Hollywood to put DRM between me and the product I purchased. I have been sending them emails and calling them all the time.

I don't know how many times I've told them "You guys really need to find a way to completely own something that I paid money for! I absolutely HATE using a product any way I like! Please prevent my from doing things like being able to play it back on any device I want. I wish there was some way I'd be forced to pay more for media players because they have to license your digital content bull****!"

dud said,
Yeah man! I've been BEGGING Hollywood to put DRM between me and the product I purchased. I have been sending them emails and calling them all the time.

I don't know how many times I've told them "You guys really need to find a way to completely own something that I paid money for! I absolutely HATE using a product any way I like! Please prevent my from doing things like being able to play it back on any device I want. I wish there was some way I'd be forced to pay more for media players because they have to license your digital content bull****!"

But you don't own anything... You are 'buying the rights' to view it.

They will always own the movie, and it doesn't matter whether it is VHS DRM or what they proposed here.

If they couldn't 'retain' ownership and 'sell' usage/viewing rights, THEY WOULD STOP MAKING MOVIES.


I kind of like the movies that are created, and what to encourage them to keep doing it.

thenetavenger said,

But you don't own anything... You are 'buying the rights' to view it.

That's just being pedantic though.

When I buy a DVD, I see it as owning it. . . not the movie rights, but the DVD. I want to watch the DVD any way I wish. If movie companies don't like that then they should stop releasing them. Yes, if I don't like how they release the movie, then that is my problem to sort out. My way of sorting it might just be piracy. :troll face: Problem?

thenetavenger said,

But you don't own anything... You are 'buying the rights' to view it.

If i'm buying the rights then why do i have to buy it a 2nd time when it comes on a new format ? Why do i need to buy it again if my physical disk is broken ?

Doctor Neurus said,
Why is this such a problem? Isn't what everyone's been asking for?

on any “SCSA-enabled” (ie Hollywood-approved) device like IPTVs, Blu-ray players, tablets, smartphones and game consoles.

I see this as a problem. I don't want to buy new hardware again if my current hardware is perfectly working.

It looks like HDCP all over again.

I honestly think it's the time for government to regulate. I'm not for regulation but enough is enough. We need boundaries about what those companies can and cannot do to protect the legal users.

LaP said,

I see this as a problem. I don't want to buy new hardware again if my current hardware is perfectly working.

It looks like HDCP all over again.

I honestly think it's the time for government to regulate. I'm not for regulation but enough is enough. We need boundaries about what those companies can and cannot do to protect the legal users.


I don't mind saving for a while to buy new stuff. Considering corrections, improvements, and addition of features, it's best to keep updating.

dud said,
Yeah man! I've been BEGGING Hollywood to put DRM between me and the product I purchased. I have been sending them emails and calling them all the time.

I don't know how many times I've told them "You guys really need to find a way to completely own something that I paid money for! I absolutely HATE using a product any way I like! Please prevent my from doing things like being able to play it back on any device I want. I wish there was some way I'd be forced to pay more for media players because they have to license your digital content bull****!"


This whole "zomg! I have the right to do what I want with my DVD" is ridiculous. The is only ONE thing to do with music and video: consume it.

Lets be honest man, it's not like they have to be the police and do stupid **** with their stuff just to protect it... those that purchase these movies and stuff give you more money than what you will get from these people who pirate it, which they probably won't buy anyways with DRM... I mean how much freaking richer do you want to be? Isn't what they already get enough? I mean I'm pretty sure none of these guys are really NEEDING more money.

/random rant???

damn these companies are run by most lethargic morons on this planet.

through SCSA you will achieve nothing. just stop trying to change the current of the pacific ocean and let the obvious take over.

If it works something like Steam (but for videos) or Netflix, in the sense that the DRM is completely passive and allows you to access the content you buy anywhere you are. Then hell yeah welcome to the 21st Century Hollywood, only took you about 10 years or so.

Doubt it.

It will probably be again a hidden device drivers (or something else hidden to the users) that doesn't show in programs and features and can't be un-installed from there.

Steam does have DRM included. But it's a piece of software that is not hidden. You also don't need special approved hardware to use it.

If it's like steam i'm all for it. But i wont hold my breath ...

Edited by LaP, Mar 3 2012, 6:45pm :