HP revealed to be the latest to join Chromebook family

Google's Chrome OS has gained yet another OEM. Following the lead of Samsung, Acer and most recently Lenovo, HP has now been revealed to be planning the launch of the Pavilion Chromebook 14-c010us PC.

The information comes from a PDF file on HP's website that was discovered earlier today. The Chromebook will have a 14 inch screen, along with an Intel 1.1 GHz Celeron processor, 2 GB of RAM, a 16 GB SSD and a weight of 3.96 pounds. The battery life for this model is rather modest; the PDF indicates a maximum life of just 4:15 hours.

The PDF gives no indication of a launch date for the HP Chromebook, nor is there a price point. This weekend, Acer President JT Wong indicated that its $199 Chromebook has been a success for the company since it launched in November and that its Chromebooks now account for up to 10 percent of its notebook sales in the US.

With HP now becoming the fourth major PC OEM confirmed to be launching a Chromebook, one must wonder if PC makers are concerned about the launch reception of Windows 8; they may also not be happy with Microsoft that it decided to launch its own PC hardware with the Surface tablet.

Source: HP PDF | Image via HP
Via: The Verge

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37 Comments

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For once I can safely say that you could do more with a Linux distro on that same notebook. At least with Linux, you're not bound to the Internet....

Why would anybody wan't a chromebook ?
You get exactly the same features - and so much more - with windows (or real linux) (and the browser of your choosing) on a similar PC with a similar price tag. My guess is that you get double the horsepower, disk space bla bla as well.

Must be google fanbois that buys this stuff.

pantera9 said,
Why would anybody wan't a chromebook ?
You get exactly the same features - and so much more - with windows (or real linux) (and the browser of your choosing) on a similar PC with a similar price tag. My guess is that you get double the horsepower, disk space bla bla as well.

Must be google fanbois that buys this stuff.


I think the clue lies in the fact that they're (supposedly - I haven't tried one) less complex and easier to maintain for a generally worry free user experience. Kind of like that other "fairly" popular tablet device on the market. Sometimes "less features" is a feature in itself when you have to worry and take care of fewer things, like local storage management, Backups, antivirus, theft protection, synchronizing your data, etc. That's kind of a big deal for regular consumers.

recursive said,
Because you can get one for roughly a 100 bucks?

Yeah, that too.

I've seen tons of these returned. just like when the days of the Linux netbooks. these companies just don't get it. chrome OS is a failure.

What is going to happen is this:

People will buy Chromebook (which is cheap), then install either Win7/XP or variation of Linux distros to make it a regular notebook.

recursive said,
They are ARM so I don't think you can install Windows on it, unless you have install media for Windows RT of course.

Their funeral.

Microsoft made the great decision to now make their own hardware,because it saw what OEMs started do with android,and now chromebooks.

I think Microsoft should start limiting their OEM partners to a select few,and let the rest go make chromebooks with 16gb storage and 1ghz Celeron chips with 4 hours battery life. I'd love to see the margins,or lack there of on these devices.

Acer is just bitter because their PC shipments dropped %15, while the overall PC market only dropped %3.2 in 2012. This has nothing to do with windows 8,and everything to do with acer.

By the way,yea that %3.2 is pretty big considering the hundreds of millions of PCs sold,but Microsoft is now entering in the tablet market that may have taken away some of those sales.

recursive said,
I believe it is the other way around. The OEMs are jumping ship because MS introduced the Surface.

Microsoft was right to introduce the surface. They should have been releasing their own hardware years ago. OEM's make junk. Then they're commoditized, and made even worse by the **** installed on them at the factories.

Microsoft should not be abandoning this low end market, it will come back to haunt them. It doesn't matter if the products suck, it matters if they are selling and they are. Start by releasing a $200 tablet.

jimmyfal said,
Microsoft should not be abandoning this low end market, it will come back to haunt them. It doesn't matter if the products suck, it matters if they are selling and they are. Start by releasing a $200 tablet.

Agreed they definatly should not. It might be financially agreeable to abandon and focus on maximizing profit but it will mean Microsoft loses a lot of marketshare. Even if they make more money at the end the public percention will be hurt and Windows reputation on the long-term will be in trouble.

But it is hard to compete with something as cheap as a Chromebook, mainly because Chrome OS runs on cheaper hardware. Which is why Microsoft should bring Windows RT to compete on the low-end. Give it away for cheap (or free) to OEMs. Windows RT might not run legacy apps but neither does Chrome, iOS or Android. It does run on cheaper and lighter hardware and it stil is Windows. Meaning support for driver and hardware such as printers. Meaning many advanced options build into the OS that competitors dont have (like advanced networking options).

There is great value in Windows, especially now that Win 8/RT is so fast and smooth. Microsoft just needs to work on the UI and make it competitive with the competition. Yes this means a focus on touch (although they could add a mouse-input mode). But more importantly they need to accept that the market has changed. There are cheaper competitors with less features that meet the requirements of certain parts of the market. Tablets are enough for many consumers, Microsoft needs to compete with Tablet-PC: the best of both worlds. They need to lower the price of Windows RT to make this happen.

What you don't understand is that a computer such as the Surface Pro, which has more memory, more 8 times the storage, has a touch screen and pen, weighs half of this (but some still claim that it is too heavy), and has a processor that makes the processor in this Chromebook look like an abacus, and has more battery life - is a horrible computer. But this computer will destroy Microsoft!

Chromebooks, I forsee turning into the new netbook. Cheap pcs with cheap parts made by every maker out there with all identical specs. I mean seriously, an intel celeron? And only 5hrs of battery life, sounds pretty pathetic for what its actually meant to do "all in the cloud". Meh maybe its just me.

With the netbook market going bust these are the new cheap alternative from OEMs. They would be better off trying to sell lower end tablets for the same price than basically netbook v2.

Whatever the case, the profits on these are probably to laugh at. As MS tries to get the average price for PC hardware to go higher so OEMs can actually make more money they seem to still be stuck into this cheap as chips mentality that does nothing but eat into profits.

For public companies, it's ALL about dividends - without earnings, you are a crap company. Dell is trying to go private to avoid this sort of pressure. With US sovereign debt (also known as Treasuries) almost technically at zero, they are are no longer the darlings of pension funds they used to be (except way out there at the thirty-year stretch). That, if anything, puts more pressure on corporate equities (stocks) and debt, since it's also taxable (and at higher rates, especially in the US) - not less. Since those low-end conglomerations can't run Windows of any sort (note that Windows 7 is not going on these hyper-low-end portables with Celeron CPUs or low-end AMD APUs), they are using the free Chromebook OS to keep margins elevated. How much would any of you care to bet that this is mostly repurposed ex-7-planned parts-bin raiding?

PGHammer said,
For public companies, it's ALL about dividends - without earnings, you are a crap company. Dell is trying to go private to avoid this sort of pressure. With US sovereign debt (also known as Treasuries) almost technically at zero, they are are no longer the darlings of pension funds they used to be (except way out there at the thirty-year stretch). That, if anything, puts more pressure on corporate equities (stocks) and debt, since it's also taxable (and at higher rates, especially in the US) - not less. Since those low-end conglomerations can't run Windows of any sort (note that Windows 7 is not going on these hyper-low-end portables with Celeron CPUs or low-end AMD APUs), they are using the free Chromebook OS to keep margins elevated. How much would any of you care to bet that this is mostly repurposed ex-7-planned parts-bin raiding?

Even if doing this somehow keeps margins at a good % all they're still doing is hurting the market. Netbooks did nothing but hurt the overall PC market, not just because the experience sucked on them with the lower end hardware, which these also have. But because now they've made consumers use to the idea of super cheap hardware. This makes it harder to sell better machines because people are use to these dirt cheap prices with, lets face it, lower margins either way you look at it and regardless of the OS. I'm sure all the OEMs would love to sell devices at $500 or more and not $200.

I can't wait to get one of these and install the new Office 2013 on it, Visual Studio, iTunes, and all the other apps that I use every day! It is going to be great!

And games, LOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOL

Games !!! LOLOLOLLOLOLOL

Chromebook has no games, so funny LOL

Personally, I have no use for a Chromebook, but I can see the appeal it might have for someone who basically lives in the web browser anyway.

CSharp. said,
Personally, I have no use for a Chromebook, but I can see the appeal it might have for someone who basically lives in the web browser anyway.

The point of my comment is that we hear over and over that WinRT is useless because you cannot use the programs that you run every day on it. Here we have a computer with a very limited set of programs you can run (a year ago they had a little over 6000 apps!!! - how many of those are fart apps?) but if you listen to some, it will destroy Microsoft so they should just give up now.

nohone said,

The point of my comment is that we hear over and over that WinRT is useless because you cannot use the programs that you run every day on it. Here we have a computer with a very limited set of programs you can run (a year ago they had a little over 6000 apps!!! - how many of those are fart apps?) but if you listen to some, it will destroy Microsoft so they should just give up now.


I'm not sure I've heard a single person suggest that Chromebooks will destroy Microsoft.

CSharp. said,

I'm not sure I've heard a single person suggest that Chromebooks will destroy Microsoft.

From the article at (an article from a Neowin writer, not some commentor) http://www.neowin.net/news/len...ould-microsoft-be-concerned:

If Google can get Lenovo onboard with their OS, it could send a strong message to Microsoft that their OS dominance may be in jeopardy.

From http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...ons-in-sales-to-chromebook/

an analyst claims that for every Chromebook user, Microsoft will lose (a conservative number) $300.

And then I can dig up many comments from here that say that Chromebook will severely harm Microsoft, if not destroy them.

nohone said,

From the article at (an article from a Neowin writer, not some commentor) http://www.neowin.net/news/len...ould-microsoft-be-concerned:

From http://www.neowin.net/forum/to...ons-in-sales-to-chromebook/

an analyst claims that for every Chromebook user, Microsoft will lose (a conservative number) $300.

And then I can dig up many comments from here that say that Chromebook will severely harm Microsoft, if not destroy them.


There's a difference between "harming" and "destroying". Should Microsoft be worried or at least concerned? Sure. Which I bet they are anyway. At least I'm hoping Ballmer doesn't laugh at it in the same way that he laughed at the iPhone when it first appeared. (Not saying this will become as big a deal)

nohone said,

The point of my comment is that we hear over and over that WinRT is useless because you cannot use the programs that you run every day on it. Here we have a computer with a very limited set of programs you can run (a year ago they had a little over 6000 apps!!! - how many of those are fart apps?) but if you listen to some, it will destroy Microsoft so they should just give up now.

I do not think, and I do not hope, that ChromeBook will destroy Surface RT; personally I do not have use for either one but, obviously, personal preferences and needs greatly vary.
Said that I also add that I remember when a poorly considered GUI add-on to DOS was launched with a lot of skepticism among the at the time computer users...... it was called Windows.
What I mean is that nowadays too many people discard the notion that something well established, and again I am not referring specifically to ChromeBook vice Surface, just speaking in general terms, could not be dethronized by a new player, as well by an established one with a new concept.
Palm was the king of PDA, MS took over ( WM had almost 50% of the market at its peak), then Apple dislodged MS, and now we have Android.

The scenario does not apply only to the mobile market: WordPerfect and WordStar looked inexpugnable with their lock on the word processor market as Quattro Pro and Lotus were for the spreadsheet one.; again Word and Excel appeared and in a very short time, considering the dynamics of the market at the time, the "Office" became the de-facto standard for a productivity suite.
The bottom line of the story is that whenever a company, no matter how big, how deeply entrenched in the market, stop thinking ahead, innovating and pushing forward... that company will fail.

Fritzly said,
...

The point is not that MS should not be worried - they should as all companies should be. The point is that the very things that people keep repeating as a failure for WinRT are happening right here, but they are positives for Chromebook. Chromebook is just a rehash of the same thing we have been hearing will dislodge MS for decades. Remember Sun's Network Computer?

nohone said,

The point is not that MS should not be worried - they should as all companies should be. The point is that the very things that people keep repeating as a failure for WinRT are happening right here, but they are positives for Chromebook. Chromebook is just a rehash of the same thing we have been hearing will dislodge MS for decades. Remember Sun's Network Computer?

Of course.... The revenge of the dumb terminals....... :-)