HP's $199 Chromebook killer spec sheet leaked

Earlier this year, Microsoft showed off its strategy to target the Google Chromebook market and one of the devices championed on stage at WPC 2014 was HP Stream. At that time, Microsoft had not announced the specs of the device but thanks to a leak, we can now see what this entry level device has under the keyboard.

While many had thought that the device would use Intel's ATOM chips, HP has opted for the AMD A4 Micro-6400T Quad-Core SoC with 1.0 GHz (up to 1.6 GHz) and integrated graphics unit Radeon R3 that only needs 4.5 watts of juice. This means that the laptop should be able to run without an active fan, according to the source of this information which is said to be an HP manual.

To no surprise, the RAM is not upgradable, so if you buy this machine, choose wisely and it looks like you can choose up to 2GB max. Storage options are quite small, to no surprise, with 32GB and 64GB on tap but there is support for SD cards which should allow you to easily expand the memory. You also get 100GB on OneDrive storage for 2 years with the device.

Finally, the device has a 14in display running at very disappointing 1366x768 resolution; you can check out the entire spec sheet at the bottom of this post.

It's not surprising that the specs are at the bottom end of the market and we will be curious to see how well Windows 8.1 performs on this setup. Considering that Chromebooks have faired well running on basic hardware, Microsoft needs to make sure that it's platform runs smooth to effectively compete with Google at the low end of the market.

Source: Mobilegeeks.de

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should have been "HP's $199 Chromebook killer: spec sheet leaked" And doesn't HP also sell Chromebooks too? the margin on these things has to be razor thin.

Wow, I have a two year old laptop that cost $200 back then which has better/comparable specs apart from the GPU I and on a laptop, who cares?). This device is pretty sad. Funny though that they were bashing Chromebooks and now they feel the need to compete? Why not push a lower end Surface PR something, since MS thinks they're better for the target audience than full fledged laptops? That's the most confusing part.

Who is 'they'? I don't remember HP, the manufacturer of this device, bashing Chromebooks. Do you have anything to back up your seemingly baseless internet comment?

Exactly. I'm referring to the part where it says: "Microsoft showed off its strategy to target the Google Chromebook"

I guess I should have started a new paragraph at "Funny" because I wasn't still talking about this specific device.

My old laptop runs 8.1 on specs much lower than that. Granted launching modern apps takes a bit too long for my taste. But the OS itself runs very smooth on the hardware,

Is Chromebook still online only? But I can't help but feel that will be a dealbreaker for most. Right now its enthousiasts who are aware of the limitations, dont mind them and see this as a very cheap deal (it is). But I don't think the general public will react in the same way. Especially since laptops are supposed to be about mobility. You can take it with you on the road. Just imagine the painful experience a family would go through if they take their chromebook camping.

Fahim S. said,
Chromebooks are not online only - there are a decent number of offline apps available for them.

A step in the right direction then. As long as you can browse, view and save content offline then it won't be a dealbreaker. How is Google Drive integration? Is content saved offline synced once you go online?

Ronnet said,

A step in the right direction then. As long as you can browse, view and save content offline then it won't be a dealbreaker. How is Google Drive integration? Is content saved offline synced once you go online?

Yes, content is saved offline and synced back to the cloud. Obviously, because the capacity of devices can be less of the cloud storage an individual has, content can be selectively synced to the device.

Would have been nice to see 1080p on a 14" screen... And 32GB, it's enough for Win8 and Office and that's about it, nice to see an SD card...

But hey, it's $199... Remember the first Netbook, for the same price with MUCH worst spec...

In comparing the specs with this device to other Chrome books at similar or more expensive prices, this windows 8 device fairs as good or better, including the resolution.

Windows 8.1 runs very well at 2 GB of ram. Just recently I upgraded the ram in our WS at work to 4 GB in four year old systems which previously was 2 GB of ram. Since the first version of Windows 8 the systems ran the full version of Office including Access and also Photoshop. No issue arose other than the limited amount of applications open a one time.

But in the end there is no comparison to value since the Windows 8 device runs the full version of Windows and not a just browser. A Chromebook is virtually useless if it not connected to the internet and runs zero desktop applications. For anyone wanting to do anything on a Chrome book outside of the Google world is pretty much out luck. So where is the value in that?

More junk Windows machines to ruin the experience. Yippee!!!

This hardware will be instantly crippled once infected with all the malware, etc out there.

AmazingRando said,
This hardware will be instantly crippled once infected with all the malware, etc out there.

Try not hitting every download link you see and read up on basic computer security... works wonders. ;)

Max Norris said,

Try not hitting every download link you see and read up on basic computer security... works wonders. ;)

Tell that to the customers who bitch about this stuff. :/

dead.cell said,
Tell that to the customers who bitch about this stuff. :/

I do to every one that I have to deal with, but still, the fault's still squarely in the end-user's lap though. Microsoft isn't making you do stupid things, you do that on your own. (You as in that clueless user, not you specifically.) Not even specific to Windows, give me somebody who doesn't know a thing about Linux or OSX and I can have them totally wreck their system in a few seconds flat if they're gullible enough to listen. No different than "Click here for free ____." Common sense.

Max Norris said,

Try not hitting every download link you see and read up on basic computer security... works wonders. ;)

Oh god you're a genius and have solved all my issues! Hurray! /s

You've actually contributed nothing to the conversation and I've seen machines 3x more powerful than this crippled by pre-installed bloat and malware/crapware and so have you.

And yes I do think Microsoft is responsible for some of the issue. In fact I think there could be a considerable class action suit brought against them for the sheer amount of lost time and money due to their insecure products and software production compared to their competitors.

AmazingRando said,
Oh god you're a genius and have solved all my issues! Hurray! /s

Congrats on completely glossing over a reasonable option and going on your merry blind way.

AmazingRando said,
You've actually contributed nothing to the conversation and I've seen machines 3x more powerful than this crippled by pre-installed bloat and malware/crapware and so have you.

Sure I have.. and it's the exact same reason why. The user messed up... this stuff just doesn't magically appear out of thin air. Quite an amazing trick if it does. Pre-installed bloat is on the OEM's.. you know, do your homework before plunking down a lot of cash on a system.

AmazingRando said,
And yes I do think Microsoft is responsible for some of the issue. In fact I think there could be a considerable class action suit brought against them for the sheer amount of lost time and money due to their insecure products and software production compared to their competitors.

Right, it's Microsoft's fault that they don't have somebody holding your hand 24/7... *facepalm* The user visited some shady site. The user chose to download some random crap. The user ignored the warning that was given saying it's going to install something into their system. Yep.. Microsoft's fault.

So who do I send the lawyers after for the Linux boxes I've had to fix due to being hacked, rootkits, or just general configuration error on the user's part?

Max Norris said,

Congrats on completely glossing over a reasonable option and going on your merry blind way.

Sure I have.. and it's the exact same reason why. The user messed up... this stuff just doesn't magically appear out of thin air. Quite an amazing trick if it does. Pre-installed bloat is on the OEM's.. you know, do your homework before plunking down a lot of cash on a system.

Right, it's Microsoft's fault that they don't have somebody holding your hand 24/7... *facepalm* The user visited some shady site. The user chose to download some random crap. The user ignored the warning that was given saying it's going to install something into their system. Yep.. Microsoft's fault.

So who do I send the lawyers after for the Linux boxes I've had to fix due to being hacked, rootkits, or just general configuration error on the user's part?

After more than a decade of viruses, spyware, rootkits, malware, botware and 2 entire industries built on the fact that Windows was a horrible insecure mess, it's no longer a reasonable suggestion that the user be relied on to know about how to keep his computer properly secured.

Simple example: Primary account setup on any new Windows computer = Admin. I'm over it.

You're working under the assumption that a user bought a car sold as being safe, but everyone they know has had issues with it randomly wrecking and then you still blaming the driver for not driving it safe enough. Hell after 9 versions of Windows featuring file sharing it can still be a mess between two Windows computer on the same network.

And now that there are several mature and feature rich alternatives it makes the faults even more apparent.

AmazingRando said,
Simple example: Primary account setup on any new Windows computer = Admin. I'm over it.

Aaaaand right there you're doing it wrong. First, current versions of Windows don't have you blindly running around as an unrestricted admin account.. you still need to give consent to actually install that naughty stuff, or even worse, disable the checks entirely, again on you. Got somebody in your house who doesn't know better and you don't want to be able to blindly install things? Don't set them up as an admin.. you know, just like you're supposed to do with any OS.

AmazingRando said,
You're working under the assumption that a user bought a car sold as being safe, but everyone they know has had issues with it randomly wrecking and then you still blaming the driver for not driving it safe enough.

Flawed analogy. That car is busted up, will fail regardless. Installing malware wasn't done by Windows. That was done by the end user. The only way to stop something like that is to completely deny the ability to install software at all... oh that doesn't sound terribly useful now does it? And that's not even specific to Windows, at all. All OS's have malware, without exception. Why is there so much of it? Just look at how many people use it.. that's why. It's all about money.. feeding ads, stealing info, etc etc.. which OS are they going to go after? The one that has over a billion people using it daily. Can spin it any way you like but that's a hard fact.

AmazingRando said,

You're working under the assumption that a user bought a car sold as being safe, but everyone they know has had issues with it randomly wrecking and then you still blaming the driver for not driving it safe enough. Hell after 9 versions of Windows featuring file sharing it can still be a mess between two Windows computer on the same network.

And now that there are several mature and feature rich alternatives it makes the faults even more apparent.

Statistically, people with alcohol in their system have most of the time wrecked their cars. So, a new car company decides to disable the engine of the car as soon as it detects that the driver has alcohol in his system. Hmmm ... who wants to buy this car?! Is it the car manufacturer's responsibility that alcoholics wreck their cars?

Also, in comparison to a car, a bike is a much simpler and 'feature rich' alternative, but, a bike is not quite as capable.

I guess I should make the concession that the user is to blame directly for their actions. But the Windows Operating system has and still does facilitate the abuse by users who are ignorant for whatever reason.

And yes, current versions of Windows bought will send you straight into "Owner" accounts that have full admin access. See them a few times a week.

And yes Windows is attacked more because it's popular. And while some of that popularity was gotten illegally the fact remains it is the most used OS on the planet. That being said it should be much much better than it is. PC sales arent just stalling because computing needs are changing. Many people are making a choice to go with devices that only do what they want (email and web) instead of messing with yet another confusing PC running Windows that gets destroyed thru various means without them understanding how or why.

Now this is where you say it's their fault and we go round and round again.

lamborghini said,

So, a new car company decides to disable the engine of the car as soon as it detects that the driver has alcohol in his system. Hmmm ... who wants to buy this car?!

So, let's be clear. You would vote with your dollar and stand up to a car company and refuse to buy a car that is capable of stopping you from drinking and driving. That is what you are saying.

Who would buy that car? I would. I dont drink and drive or plan on it. And while car companies dont promote drinking and driving they sure advertise a LOT of alcohol on their Nascars. I mean come on.

Also, the bike is a good alternative, but not feature rich compared to a car. A bike is the better choice for you than a car in short range A to B traveling. It's good for your health, the environment, etc. So why not own a bike and use it when you should and own a car and use it when you should for car things? But if you own a bike, you're not going to just drop all expectations of your car being made well and safe.

AmazingRando said,
I guess I should make the concession that the user is to blame directly for their actions. But the Windows Operating system has and still does facilitate the abuse by users who are ignorant for whatever reason.

Every operating system will penalize you for being ignorant. Each and every one.

AmazingRando said,
PC sales arent just stalling because computing needs are changing.

... Except they're not, in fact they're forcast to sell more in the near future.

AmazingRando said,
Now this is where you say it's their fault and we go round and round again.

Sure, if you're going to blindly assume that somebody is supposed to be holding your hand 24/7 to keep you from doing something stupid, yea, let's go.

AmazingRando said,
So, let's be clear. You would vote with your dollar and stand up to a car company and refuse to buy a car that is capable of stopping you from drinking and driving. That is what you are saying.

Who would buy that car? I would.


Maybe I'm not getting what you're saying.. but it sounds like you're wanting an OS that doesn't let you install anything. That's pretty much the only way you're going to have a 100% safe system. (Barring vulnerabilities in the OS of course, and sadly Windows isn't the biggest offender there.)

Max Norris said,

Aaaaand right there you're doing it wrong. First, current versions of Windows don't have you blindly running around as an unrestricted admin account.

Um. Yeah. First account is recommend and set as Admin level. If there are zero other accounts on the machine, how are you supposed to change admin level functions when you set yourself as a limited user? And if a limited user can simply *presto* make an Admin account at any point in time later on then what good reason was it to make them a Limited Account in the first place?!

Max Norris said,

The one that has over a billion people using it daily. Can spin it any way you like but that's a hard fact.

Are you talking Windows here or iOS? Because I dont see a lot of malware infesting iOS platforms and stealing peoples info and becoming part of a botnet, etc etc.

So now here's the part where you realize that iOS has millions of users and few issues and your reply will be "Well it's not a full OS like Windows is."

To which my reply is, "Why for the love of god, does any end user need to have IIS installed right out of the gate? Or their own buggy virtual machine? Or the ability for one signed installation execute two separate code installs? Who at Microsoft during their Trusted Computing marketing gimmic decided to include those little gems?"

I mean, tell me if I'm wrong. Maybe it is Joe User's fault for buying a PC at Walmart (or as MS would call it "a sale") and not knowing he should constantly keep his Java up to date, or that his browser should probably stop installing toolbars after the 12th or 13th one.

Then here's where you say, "Microsoft didnt make that software, it's not their fault it's not secure."

To which I will say, "Then they should stop advertising Windows as being able to run everything in a happy-go-lucky, problem free platform of joy because we all know better."

Max Norris said,

Maybe I'm not getting what you're saying.. but it sounds like you're wanting an OS that doesn't let you install anything. That's pretty much the only way you're going to have a 100% safe system. (Barring vulnerabilities in the OS of course, and sadly Windows isn't the biggest offender there.)

Here's a simple question to ask yourself to test how serious and/or capable you think Microsoft is at making a secure system. How can a user on Windows still be able allowed to do ANYTHING that affects the entire system? How is it 2014 and that still be a thing?

Microsoft's solution still has nothing to do with recovering or blowing out the offending profile. No, you can blow out and restore Windows. How is that still a thing and we're all ok with that? Hell most people, me included, cheered when it's super easily baked into Windows 8! Finally no more long hours of formatting and reinstalling the OS when it goes to crap. We can just hit 3 mouse clicks and go back to the default OS.

AmazingRando said,
Um. Yeah. First account is recommend and set as Admin level. If there are zero other accounts on the machine, how are you supposed to change admin level functions when you set yourself as a limited user?

An admin user who still can't blindly do anything system related with getting elevation from the OS first. And if you're the sole user, you still set up two accounts. Unless you're the type who like to run as root on Linux too. Tsk.

AmazingRando said,
So now here's the part where you realize that iOS has millions of users and few issues and your reply will be "Well it's not a full OS like Windows is."

Cute, but no. Here's where I point out that 99.99% of the time you're getting iOS software from one single place, barring piracy. With Windows you don't have Microsoft putting up a walled garden telling you where you can and get your software.. so if you're not using any common sense, you can easily grab something you shouldn't. Not rocket science here.

AmazingRando said,
To which my reply is, "Why for the love of god, does any end user need to have IIS installed right out of the gate? Or their own buggy virtual machine?"

Erm IIS or Hyper-V isn't installed right out of the gate. You have to do that yourself after the fact.

AmazingRando said,
I mean, tell me if I'm wrong. Maybe it is Joe User's fault for buying a PC at Walmart (or as MS would call it "a sale") and not knowing he should constantly keep his Java up to date, or that his browser should probably stop installing toolbars after the 12th or 13th one.

Well, yea. You run outdated software you run the risk of getting screwed. Especially Java since that's been exploited to high heaven and back so many times, on more than just Windows mind you. Installing toolbars? Doesn't happen automatically, sorry.

AmazingRando said,
To which I will say, "Then they should stop advertising Windows as being able to run everything in a happy-go-lucky, problem free platform of joy because we all know better."

Where does Microsoft tell you to run around and install anything and everything like an idiot?

AmazingRando said,
Here's a simple question to ask yourself to test how serious and/or capable you think Microsoft is at making a secure system. How can a user on Windows still be able allowed to do ANYTHING that affects the entire system? How is it 2014 and that still be a thing?

Ummmm ever update your OS? Install programs for all users? Ever work in an IT department? That's quite a silly question. (Hint.. you need to affect the entire OS when you update OSX, Linux, well... everything *facepalm*) Many programs ask you if you want to install for yourself or for all users. Guess what you need to do to allow it for all users.. grant the OS permission! Shocker.

AmazingRando said,
It's Ok, Max. You just fell down the stairs because you were clumsy. Windows loves you.

Ugh seriously? Comon if you're going to make a point, fine, make it, but if you can't take an honest reply and resort to..that.. sorry. Just for the record, I have more systems here running something other than Windows, but glad to see it still loves me even though I see others.

This A4 APU will probably cold boot to login screen in about 5 seconds if paired to an SSD. Faster than ChromeOS.

I had a similar setup built around the E-350. This A4 is even faster.

TheCyberKnight said,
This A4 APU will probably cold boot to login screen in about 5 seconds if paired to an SSD. Faster than ChromeOS.

I had a similar setup built around the E-350. This A4 is even faster.


My exp. with the A4 with Windows has been rather poor as far as performance. I think Chrome OS is about all it could do well.

"Finally, the device has a 14in display running at very disappointing 1366x768 resolution; you can check out the entire spec sheet at the bottom of this post."

You expected "Retina" for that price?

the only problem i see with these specs is that internal storage. you're not going to be able to do pretty much anything with that amount of storage

I suppose if it's competing with a Chromebook, that's okay. Those in the market for one would only want to do stuff on the internet anyway. Just my guess.

I think I rather have only 32GB of storage but 4GB of memory. You can buy more storage on a SD card and OneDrive gives you another 100GB or 1TB if you sign up for Office 365.

Have 8.1 running on a junker with much lower specs and it performs reasonably well. (Considering it's a junker and all.) Don't see why this wouldn't be acceptable for the price. Hey you want faster, don't buy a $199 computer.

Considering the fact that it uses eMMC as internal storage and runs without a fan, I am quite curious why you are dissuaded by the price.

Android devices at $250 price points also do not carry much performance.

The device is competing with Chromebooks and the spec/price has been constructed accordingly. Compared to a Chromebook this PC should be fantastic.

lamborghini said,
Considering the fact that it uses eMMC as internal storage and runs without a fan, I am quite curious why you are dissuaded by the price.

Ahh no I'm not dissuaded, was just commenting on people who were expecting something high-end that this price tag, and was saying that I've ran the OS on worse without issue.. probably worded that poorly. Not something I'd get myself but at $199 that's pretty impressive.

its about $100 too expensive, and if its competing as a chromebook, about $150 too expensive.

HP seems to have a desire to fail with all these little off-beat devices they keep trying to flog!