HTC: Benchmark boosting on the One M8 is now a feature

Last fall, it was discovered that a number of Android based smartphones made by Samsung, HTC, Asus and others boosted their normal performance when certain software benchmarks were run on those devices. Now HTC says that their new One M8 not only does the same thing, but it's now a feature of the smartphone.

CNet reports that when the regular version of the AnTuTu benchmark is run on the One M8, it generated scores that beat out the Samsung Galaxy S5 and the LG G Pro 2. However, running the AnTuTu X version, which is programmed to get around the performance 'cheats', showed scores on the One M8 that were behind that of the Galaxy S5 and the G Pro 2.

HTC was asked about this and the company admitted that when the One M8 detects some benchmarking programs, the smartphone does indeed "optimize in certain scenarios to produce the best possible performance." In fact, the company said that the HTC One M8 will have a new "High Performance Mode" that can be enabled in the developer settings by the user. It will allow the smartphone to have better CPU and GPU performance, but at the cost of lower battery life. The US versions of the One M8 will get the "High Performance Mode" via a future software update.

Source: CNet | Image via HTC

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16 Comments

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I really do not feel there is anything wrong with this. When benchmarking, it automatically lets the process use all it's available resources - versus usually being a little more conservative to save power (the cpu governors, anyone?). It's just like how my HTC One turns the brightness to 100% automatically when I start the camera. Benchmarking is to see how well a phone can do.... it's not just creating fake numbers.

They said that there will be an option in the developer mode that you allow you to enable and disable this feature. Its not just for boasting bench marks its for giving you more power when the device calls for it. So this could be for some power intensive games where it peaks to graphic intensive area or something like that.

Meh, they already do that on pc by sending their best possible sample vidéo card to reviewer. Witch is the same because the chance that you own one as good yourself is pretty low

I think it's because there's hard to pick up an "better" review unit for Titans lol. It usually goes for the mid tier cards and such as far as I know.

Although to the point. This is nothing new and I'm a bit confused why Samsung got into this mess in the first place for it? It works the same way on our PC's, when you're benchmarking it'll drain every last drop of your power to score your PC (if optimized correctly). It seems to be the case with the HTC, it won't spare your battery to give lower scores. And lets be honest, how many people buying the phone will benchmark it anyway? We should remind ourselves that we are actually an minority in the scene.

I don't see a problem with it but they should have it disabled at all times unless the user enables it from the dev options menu. This way anyone could have a little speed boost if they want and benchmarks will get stock ratings.

theres a cool illusion in the image above. if you keep scrolling up and down real quick, the phone that's leaning on the side looks like its wobbling.

either that or I need some more coffee.

vcfan said,
theres a cool illusion in the image above. if you keep scrolling up and down real quick, the phone that's leaning on the side looks like its wobbling.
either that or I need some more coffee.

The fact that I actually tried it out myself means I need that coffee more than you do

I don't see the big problem, benchmarks are meant to show top performance which means boosting the clocks. Ive never heard of benching in the pc scene with underclocks when going for a performance score.

Circaflex said,
I don't see the big problem, benchmarks are meant to show top performance which means boosting the clocks. Ive never heard of benching in the pc scene with underclocks when going for a performance score.

There is a difference though, in the pc overclocking scene its all about pushing your rig to max and boasting about how you did.

with stock hardware, reviewers intention is to show what level of performance they can expect from a device.

when these phones detect a benchmark app and suddenly boost performance to a level that you would not see day to say, it creates an artificial score.

it basically means benchmarks on phones should be discarded, as they mean didly squat. But if you supercooled your new gfx card and oclocked it to an insane level, it would be interesting, while at the same time not skewing any kind of base level reviews of the hardware.