HTC CEO confirms it - no more locked bootloaders on future devices

Following up on a story we ran earlier this week about HTC "reviewing" their bootloader policy, the CEO of HTC, Peter Chou, has made an announcement on the company's official Facebook page that should make a lot of people very happy.

"There has been overwhelmingly customer feedback that people want access to open bootloaders on HTC phones. I want you to know that we've listened. Today, I'm confirming we will no longer be locking the bootloaders on our devices. Thanks for your passion, support and patience," Peter Chou, CEO of HTC

You can read the post, as well as the thousands of many thankful comments here.

This is really big news as it means that every major Android handset manufacturer now either ships their devices with an unlocked bootloader, or provides some way of unlocking them.

Having an unlocked bootloader means that owners of their devices have complete control over them. This can be quite crucial for when the device reaches the end of its support lifecycle and is no longer receiving updates from the manufacturer, as hobbyists and enthusiasts can take the latest Android source code and port it over themselves, or create optimised "roms" that increase battery life among other things.

There's still no word on how this move will affect existing devices that have already been locked down, or if HTC's latest device, the HTC Sensation, will receive an update to unlock it in the future, but you can expect to hear more information from HTC shortly.

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I can see why they would want to, but locking people out is just locking out a huge number of users. The only highlight I have with my Desire are the roms out there.

This seems rather pointless though, with more and more apps, especially DRM streaming apps now being blocked on rooted devices.

so as oem's open up. Google is clamping down and forcing you to run un-rooted phones to fully use the OS and apps on it.

HawkMan said,
This seems rather pointless though, with more and more apps, especially DRM streaming apps now being blocked on rooted devices.

so as oem's open up. Google is clamping down and forcing you to run un-rooted phones to fully use the OS and apps on it.

Unlocking the bootloader and rooting the device are not the same thing (Although they tend to go hand in hand).

Kushan said,

Unlocking the bootloader and rooting the device are not the same thing (Although they tend to go hand in hand).

Well I've yet to see anyone install a new rom that doesn't come rooted

I don't understand this bit.

This is really big news as it means that every major Android handset manufacturer now either ships their devices with an unlocked bootloader, or provides some way of unlocking them.

That's not what it means. It means that ONE major Android handset man..... and the rest.

Now Motorola needs to hurry up and follow suit. Bought an Atrix - my first Motorola phone - and if they won't take the same path, I will gladly go with HTC for my next smartphone and probably never gonna look back again.

This is really big news as it means that every major Android handset manufacturer now either ships their devices with an unlocked bootloader, or provides some way of unlocking them.
Now its down to who can make the best phones

How to improve the public acceptance of your company: Do nothing bad->Do something bad->Say you will stop doing that in the future->crowd goes wild, angels falling from the sky...

bluefisch200 said,
How to improve the public acceptance of your company: Do nothing bad->Do something bad->Say you will stop doing that in the future->crowd goes wild, angels falling from the sky...

As an opposite to:
Screwing people over since the dawn of time->New pricey-shiny toy every year->Crowd goes wild, angels falling from the sky...
?

cralias said,

As an opposite to:
Screwing people over since the dawn of time->New pricey-shiny toy every year->Crowd goes wild, angels falling from the sky...
?

Exactly

*Does a dance of joy*

This is fantastic news. I never understood why they locked bootloaders in the first place, I mean, yeah, it can potentially ruin the phone, but the user knew the risks when they decided to modify the bootloader.

Majesticmerc said,
*Does a dance of joy*

This is fantastic news. I never understood why they locked bootloaders in the first place, I mean, yeah, it can potentially ruin the phone, but the user knew the risks when they decided to modify the bootloader.

*dances with you* now I can get rid of this work around on my hd2.

Majesticmerc said,
*Does a dance of joy*

This is fantastic news. I never understood why they locked bootloaders in the first place, I mean, yeah, it can potentially ruin the phone, but the user knew the risks when they decided to modify the bootloader.

It's not a matter of "the user knew the risks" so much as "if I brick my phone I'll just get it replaced" that catches the attention of people with margins and bottom lines to worry about.

Simon- said,
Sounds like HTC are trying to ride on the wave of Motorola's criticism, but good news nonetheless.

HTC received a ton of criticism as well in the last few months. It's just HTC's one of the first ones to come out and please the enthusiast community.

OrangeFTW said,

HTC received a ton of criticism as well in the last few months. It's just HTC's one of the first ones to come out and please the enthusiast community.

Ahem, Sony Ericsson.

htc is actually one of the last ones to do this.