HTC WP7 app ported to other WP7 hardware

HTC is trying hard to distinguish itself from others on the Android platform. It does this by offering up its own skin called "Sense". This skin has yet to be brought over to the WP7 hardware as Microsoft is locking down its new platform. Instead the HTC hardware comes with their own branded apps that are only available on HTC hardware to help compensate for the inability to put their own touches on the OS.

Step in homebrewer @tomhounsell, who has managed to get at least one HTC app up and running on his Samsung Omnia. The application (shown in the picture above) is the HTC "Stocks" application running on Samsung hardware. Why is this important? Well for those who are a fan of HTC's applications, it goes to show that they can run on other hardware. Not to mention that HTC recently said that it would love to bring "Sense" over to WP7 but will work with Microsoft and respect their rules for hardware running WP7.

While this is just a very small step in the WP7 homebrew scene, it does show that applications made by vendors can work on competing manufactures hardware. Tom Hounsell has not released how he has done this and states "Good news, running HTC OEM apps on my Omnia 7. Bad news, not going to release yet as I suspect parts of my method could be used for piracy." While a notable merit in not wanting to promote piracy, it's probably safe to say that there are others out there who want to run HTC apps on their own WP7 hardware.

  

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I for one would love to see this on the Marketplace from HTC. I'd easily pay $10 for their "Sense Hub", the one that displays the weather in the live tile.

HTC Sense isn't really skin. It's a complex of programs. It's not just few widgets and slightly changed graphics, like Motoblur. There are many own programs made exclusively for HTC like Phone, Contacts/Logs, Clock/Alarm, Messaging, News feeds, Social feeds, Weather, Torch, Browser, Calendar, Gallery, Player, Finances etc etc etc
A large complex of programs to replace stock android programs.

The whole problem right now with Android is the fragmentation. MS is taking the right steps to ensure a solid platform, and I agree withem. Sense is a nice UI, but it doesn't fit with the metro UI MS has crafted so well.

Hercules said,
The whole problem right now with Android is the fragmentation. MS is taking the right steps to ensure a solid platform, and I agree withem. Sense is a nice UI, but it doesn't fit with the metro UI MS has crafted so well.

The fragmentation problem is, once again, minimal.

aftas said,

The fragmentation problem is, once again, minimal.

How many different unupgradeable versions of Android are installed on devices released in 2010 alone?

They could damn well have differentiated themselves by specs alone. Looking at the first generation WP7 hardware, the basic components are largely identical.

HTC should give up already and focus on making quality hardware again. They have been disappointing this time around with Samsung and LG making great WP7 phones. Most people are happy that HTC can't modify the UI with their crappy 'Sense' anyway, no one wants any more bloatware. They should just continue making apps for people who want them or continue the 'Sense' on their other non-WP7 phones.

I'm glad MS is being strict this time around. My wp7 phone feels clean without all that bloat and works seamless and as they promoted gets the job done much faster.

I for one can't stand Android's default interface. The only reason I even considered an Android phone is because of HTC's Sense.

.Neo said,
I for one can't stand Android's default interface. The only reason I even considered an Android phone is because of HTC's Sense.

I'm the exact opposite. I won't go near an Android device that doesn't have the stock UI, which is a big reason why I like WP7, all phones look the same software wise

SharpGreen said,

I'm the exact opposite. I won't go near an Android device that doesn't have the stock UI, which is a big reason why I like WP7, all phones look the same software wise

CM ftw

Step in homebrewer @tomhounsell, who has managed to get at least one HTC app up and running on his Samsung Omnia. The application (shown in the picture above) is the HTC "Stocks" application running on Samsung hardware. Why is this important? Well for those who are a fan of HTC's applications, it goes to show that they can run on other hardware. Not to mention that HTC recently said that it would love to bring "Sense" over to WP7 but will work with Microsoft and respect their rules for hardware running WP7.

Well duh? It's just an app...if you can get the .xap file then you can install it on anything you want. The only way to get the .xap file isn't exactly legit...and to install it on your phone you either have to use the unlocker (if it still works) or you need to have a developer certificate.

Not quite so easy - it's a marketplace XAP, which by nature comes with DRM, which you then have to remove (which is why I'm not going to detail the steps) and then eliminate some of HTC's own checks.

hounsell said,
Not quite so easy - it's a marketplace XAP, which by nature comes with DRM, which you then have to remove (which is why I'm not going to detail the steps) and then eliminate some of HTC's own checks.

Well the DRM exists, but there's already documentation out there that explains how to bypass it. But as for HTC's own checks, I don't think they would have any since then every single time they release a new phone they'll have to update.

Also would free apps require DRM protection too?

/- Razorfold said,

Well the DRM exists, but there's already documentation out there that explains how to bypass it. But as for HTC's own checks, I don't think they would have any since then every single time they release a new phone they'll have to update.

The documentation that was posted on XDA last night is too complex. The method I used was two/three steps, and well within anyone's capabilities.
And yeh, removing HTC's checks is even easier. Just cut the IsHTCDevice out of the launch code.

hounsell said,

The documentation that was posted on XDA last night is too complex. The method I used was two/three steps, and well within anyone's capabilities.
And yeh, removing HTC's checks is even easier. Just cut the IsHTCDevice out of the launch code.
Ah. Lol, I just realized you were the person who figured this out