IBM enters the business webmail market

For a long time now, Google seemed to be a leader in corporate webmail services. IBM is now aiming to cut their advantage short, by launching its own cloud-based platform, named LotusLive. It will be a relatively low-cost compared to other offerings.

At first it may not seem entirely different, when comparing it to Google Apps or Yahoo. The big difference is that it's offered by IBM, a company known for its aptitude in enterprise software. With LotusLive iNotes they want to offer "a business-class messaging solution for everyone in your organization."

LotusLive iNotes offers everything Google Apps, for instance, does too. POP 3, IMAP4 and authenticated SMTP are all included in the package. Anti-spam and anti-virus features, as well as SSL encryption are also implemented. A close look at the features page, though, reveals that it doesn't have all the bells and whistles the completion offers. On the service's homepage, IBM touts this as a great thing by claiming it has "Everything you need. Nothing you don't."

It's the price that will make this attractive to business, since it costs much less annually than Google's offering, for instance. IBM will sell it for $36 annually per worker, while Google Apps charges $50 per user annually. This could make a big difference in times like these, when saving money is everything. Another feature IBM has going for its new webmail service, is the Lotus brand and the good reputation it has in enterprise environments. It will certainly not prove a light competitor for Google. IBM expects the customers to include small and medium-sized businesses, or larger companies whose employees aren't tethered to an office desk.

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18 Comments

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hell, lotus sucks :S i can't tell ya how much i hate that application with everything it offers...

I've never commented on the quality of a piece before, but this is just poor.

Apart from the complete neglect of hosted Outlook and OWA, and as other have mentioned the complete lack of calendering, capacity and ability to integrate with SSO such as Active Directory - the real clue about the quality of the article is this line:

"Another feature IBM has going for its new webmail service, is the Lotus brand..."

You think "Lotus" makes IT Professionals or end-users get excited? Seriously - has the author actually worked in IT?

You are a free to comment, but please also comment on the original sources then. This is news, not my views. That's the difference between news and editorials.

This is only meant to be a web-based service, nothing more.

max84 said,
You are a free to comment, but please also comment on the original sources then. This is news, not my views. That's the difference between news and editorials.

This is only meant to be a web-based service, nothing more.


Fair enough Max - and no offence at you personally. Though I can't find any mention of the "Lotus brand" in the Reuters article.

Not my concept at all. I'm just reporting what Reuters and the Bookseller have written. That's why I include links in the article.

um..... outlook isn't a corporate webmail solution. Outlook is just a program used to send and receive mail and is linked to your mail server.

kiwi89 said,
um..... outlook isn't a corporate webmail solution. Outlook is just a program used to send and receive mail and is linked to your mail server.

Outlook Web Access is (which is built into exchange server)...

good god i-notes rears its head once again, any dom admins or notes users will remember i-notes hehehe, they just making it public now, not too bad a ui I suppose, but Ive not touched it since 6.5.5

Is there businesses willing to have their corporate mail served from "the cloud" or as normal non-twats call it THE INTERNET! I know for one its a nonstarter here due to the industry I work in.

As usual the devil is in the detail.

IBM are offering 1GB compared to 25gb for google apps/mail, also calendaring, talk, video, voice conferencing (for example) is included in Google Apps while IBM/Notes wants extra.

I wouldn't be surprised if IBM wouldn't get out of bed for less than 1000 seats (for e.g.)

dvb2000 said,
As usual the devil is in the detail.

IBM are offering 1GB compared to 25gb for google apps/mail, also calendaring, talk, video, voice conferencing (for example) is included in Google Apps while IBM/Notes wants extra.

I wouldn't be surprised if IBM wouldn't get out of bed for less than 1000 seats (for e.g.)

Yeah, all very good points. If you're going to step into something like this, perhaps they should actually, you know, compete? *sigh*