IE 10 "Do Not Track" options for Windows 8 explained

When Microsoft launched the Release Preview version of Windows 8, it also put in a "Do Not Track" feature as the default option for Internet Explorer 10. A group of Internet advertising companies immediately criticized this move by Microsoft, claiming that this setting on IE 10 would "undercut thriving business models, and reduce the availability and diversity of the Internet products and services."

Today, in a post on Microsoft's legal issues blog, the company's chief privacy officer Brendon Lynch said that since the Release Preview launch of Windows 8, the company has received feedback from its own consumer research that he claims show "strong support for our “consumer-privacy-first” approach to DNT." However, he admitted that the company has also heard from unnamed "interested parties" who he claims want more information on how Windows 8 users will set up the Do Not Track option in IE.

Lynch states:

In the Windows 8 set-up experience, customers will be asked to choose between two ways of configuring a number of settings: “Express Settings” or “Customize.” By providing a simple experience that allows customers to set their preferences, we’ve sought to balance ease of use with choice and control. The recommended Express Settings are designed to expedite and streamline the overall set-up process, and, if selected, generally improve a customer’s privacy, security, and overall experience on the device.

Lynch also mentions how Windows 7 users of IE 10, about which little has been announced, will handle those "Do Not Track" options, stating, "Windows 7 customers using IE 10 will receive prominent notice that DNT is turned on in their new browser, together with a link providing more information about the setting."

Source: Microsoft Issues blog

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12 Comments

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and until websites are forced to comply with DNT it's a pointless feel good feature that really does nothing but make an average user feel more secure by making them think they're not being tracked

A340600 said,
Yes, but when is IE10 coming to Windows 7.

That's a good question, it's clearly "done" since Win8 RTM'd, makes me wonder what the hold up is?

GP007 said,

That's a good question, it's clearly "done" since Win8 RTM'd, makes me wonder what the hold up is?

Windows 7 SP2.... 3-6 months after RTM of Windows 8.... money reasons ya kno!

IE 10 is clearly a modern and fast browser, but dammit... a little more simple flexibility/usability. All other browsers already support the controversial DNT, which still doesn't do what it was meant to.

Why don't they target the power users and "power users" to bring them back? How you bring back a Firefox or Chrome user when the browser does not support simple features which make the browsing experience a whole lot better?...

I'm trying hard to set IE 10 as my 'official secondary' browser, but it's becoming tiring after a while, mainly because I don't have plain luxuries I have on Firefox.

PC EliTiST said,
IE 10 is clearly a modern and fast browser, but dammit... a little more simple flexibility/usability. All other browsers already support the controversial DNT, which still doesn't do what it was meant to.

Why don't they target the power users and "power users" to bring them back? How you bring back a Firefox or Chrome user when the browser does not support simple features which make the browsing experience a whole lot better?...

I'm trying hard to set IE 10 as my 'official secondary' browser, but it's becoming tiring after a while, mainly because I don't have plain luxuries I have on Firefox.

Care to explain these features that you think are missing that power users need?

Given all the major browsers like Firefox, IE and Chrome all support addons

PC EliTiST said,
IE 10 is clearly a modern and fast browser, but dammit... a little more simple flexibility/usability. All other browsers already support the controversial DNT, which still doesn't do what it was meant to.

IE9 has DNT. And IE8 with InPrivate browsing, offers the same functionality. Dont act like MS is late to the game. (at release of IE8 the DNT header wasn't used at all)

Why don't they target the power users and "power users" to bring them back? How you bring back a Firefox or Chrome user when the browser does not support simple features which make the browsing experience a whole lot better?...

I'm trying hard to set IE 10 as my 'official secondary' browser, but it's becoming tiring after a while, mainly because I don't have plain luxuries I have on Firefox.


What are you missing? Advanced adblocker? comes default in IE9/10.
And plugins? While there arent loads of them (no need) the ones that are around, are way ahead of its competition, and have been since IE6 at least. Oh you have new plugin? Just refresh the page! No need for a freaking restart (SINCE IE6 at least, cant remember if IE5 had that too).
And whats handy and dandy, it tracks the resource usage of addons, what slows down loading pages/IE itself right down to the freaking millisecond.

And name me 1 thing IE9 or 10 is slower at then Chrome or FF. (not counting that preloading Chrome does)

The addons are the dealbreaker. Right now I use a feed notifier, facebook notifier, google url shortener and a url expander for short links so I can just hover over them and see where they go. The ad blocking in IE10 isn't anywhere near as good as Adblock Plus. I'm not sure what you're talking about it comes default? I just went to MSN.com and saw an inline flash ad on the top-right. I'm sure it's missing plenty of others.

I 100% agree that how Firefox deals with addons is very old school. Really, I have to restart the entire browser? But then again I don't use Firefox. I do like some of the functionality of IE9 and 10, but they need to get with the addon capability. Anyone disagreeing just hates change for the sake of hating change. I'm sure if they announced a robust addons system with great addons out of the gate, everyone would be creaming their jeans. But right now, since they don't really have many worth mentioning -- people will still defend it. It's interesting how that works.

I don't know what's more ironic, your comment or...your comment.

Beside collecting your browsing habbits, Chrome sends all kind of data back to google. URL-Tracker, RLZ-Tracking, Installation-ID, etc.

It's like saying I don't like the idea of being tracked, but I'm going to do anything about it.

Edited by flexkeyboard, Aug 7 2012, 8:18pm :

flexkeyboard said,
I don't know what's more ironic, your comment or...your comment.

Beside collecting your browsing habbits, Chrome sends all kind of data back to google. URL-Tracker, RLZ-Tracking, Installation-ID, etc.

It's like saying I don't like the idea of being tracked, but I'm going to do anything about it.

You took the words right out of my mouth.