IE and HTML5 do a little dance, build a little catalog

The Internet Explorer team really loves HTML5. They have put together numerous examples to show of the capabilities of the platform and of course they want to show off how well IE handles the feature set of HTML5.

In this latest example, the team developed an interactive catalog with TheFind, who is a leading vertical search engine for shopping. The result of this collaboration is Glimpse catalog which you can see here.

Microsoft is working to promote the capabilities of IE without locking out other browsers from its projects but why is the company doing this? It wants to show off the power of HTML5 and its robust feature set to help move the industry forward with web standards.

Microsoft is also providing the code that was used to create this site to help other developers design their own projects:

We also are giving away the HTML5 book framework that helped bring Catalogues online - built on turn.js, a feature-rich jQuery plugin for page flipping. This framework also includes:

1. Schema and code for the hot spotting technology. In Glimpse, the hot spotting technology allows users to identify product within the magazine with a single click.

2. Code for 3 presentation views for the book – full screen, grid view and spread view.

3. Improved IE 9 support in turn.js.

Source: Exploring IE

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20 Comments

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Yeah it loves HTML5 that much it's BOTTOM of the list of Browser with HTML5 support.

Just look at IE in the list at http://www.html5test.com for example.

Hell, even visit the site in the IE 10 preview or IE 9.

For a Large Company, they're failing to meet most of the HTML5 standard as quick as the competition.

Chrome, Safari, Maxthon, all webkit browsers, smoke IE in HTML5 at present.

If microsoft spent more time adapting IE to the new standard then making useless test pages it would suit them better.

Dermot said,
Yeah it loves HTML5 that much it's BOTTOM of the list of Browser with HTML5 support.

Just look at IE in the list at http://www.html5test.com for example.

Hell, even visit the site in the IE 10 preview or IE 9.

For a Large Company, they're failing to meet most of the HTML5 standard as quick as the competition.

Chrome, Safari, Maxthon, all webkit browsers, smoke IE in HTML5 at present.

If microsoft spent more time adapting IE to the new standard then making useless test pages it would suit them better.

Quantity =/= quality

From html5test website: "The HTML5 test does not try to test all of the new features offered by HTML5, nor does it try to test the functionality of each feature it does detect."

eddman said,

Quantity =/= quality

From html5test website: "The HTML5 test does not try to test all of the new features offered by HTML5, nor does it try to test the functionality of each feature it does detect."

And the bad quality of IE == true

But i don't have to talk about IE in the terms of quality and microsoft doing it's own thing when it comes to the web, its history already speaks for itself.

Dermot said,

And the bad quality of IE == true

But i don't have to talk about IE in the terms of quality and microsoft doing it's own thing when it comes to the web, its history already speaks for itself.

It seems you still think we're in IE6 era. Well, we are not. Now it's google who do their own thing.

Works rather nicely on Chrome at least. Personally I kinda like reading a catalog like that because they often have better shots of the clothes than what ends up on a website. It was well executed with none of the annoyances of most catalog browsers.

It's a shame they can create stuff like this while at the same time the IE user interface stays pretty stagnant and still has lots of legacy stuff in it.

I don't see how the Catalog as a Magazine metaphor can help on the desktop setup, using a pointer I mean. With touch screen makes all the sense in the world, but when you click, hold and drag is just a gimmick that wears out. Maybe if they added the flipping by actually using the flipping gesture on the touch pad then at least on laptops it will work fine.

It's a great idea, but to be honest, when shopping online, I'd rather just be able to see exactly what I want to buy. I shop online to take the hassle of looking up items or browsing a catalogue, so why would I want to do it via a fancy interface? Just filter my search criteria and show me exactly what I want, don't need excess pages.
Also, is Shashikant using a Mac about 2:20 in? Hopefully this is just an action shot and not one where he's supposed to be using IE to do the things they are talking about.

yeoo_andy_ni said,
Also, is Shashikant using a Mac about 2:20 in? Hopefully this is just an action shot and not one where he's supposed to be using IE to do the things they are talking about.

Not sure, but that's Ubuntu you can see at 2:01.

yeoo_andy_ni said,
It's a great idea, but to be honest, when shopping online, I'd rather just be able to see exactly what I want to buy. I shop online to take the hassle of looking up items or browsing a catalogue, so why would I want to do it via a fancy interface?

I think some people like perusing around a catalog and seeing stuff that they might want or stuff they might think a friend might like or whatever. Catalogs can also be designed with settings and models to illustrate combinations of items that may be ideal to the consumer.

Basically catalogs are a way to get consumers to buy or at least think about getting more. As long as there's an option online, I don't really care.

This might work well on a Touch Tablet experience. It will be interesting to see how others take advantage of this and how it fleshes out in both WinRT and Win 8 Pro environments.

At first glance... I don't see any HTML5 on that catalog page.

Edit: I see canvas only once you get into a catalog. Which is basically BMP of the scanned catalog page.
Edit 2: I removed the canvas node and it still works... so I don't know what HTML5 is actually being used. Seems like HTML+jQuery+CSS3.

Just because it works doesn't mean there isn't any HTML5. For example disable javascript on Facebook which facebook uses heavily and it still works.

lunamonkey said,
At first glance... I don't see any HTML5 on that catalog page.

Edit: I see canvas only once you get into a catalog. Which is basically BMP of the scanned catalog page.
Edit 2: I removed the canvas node and it still works... so I don't know what HTML5 is actually being used. Seems like HTML+jQuery+CSS3.

Just because there's no HTML5 tags on the HTML5 it doesn't mean is not using HTML5, the thing is that when people talk about HTML5 they are talking about a whole family of technologies. And then again, it might just be that depending on what browser your are using and your settings, there will be actual HTML5 or not, just for the sake of compatibility, and that might be handled on the server side.

Also, in very general and subjective terms, sometimes HTML5 is seen as a some sort of Web 2.5, that's the feeling it provides. Is like 2.0 but way better, so is not strange that as HTML5 popularizes people associate it with a new change in the way we browse. Not the consumer fault, because mainly HTML5 right now is an upgrade for the developers and IT people rather than the user (beyond the you don't need flash/silverlight), well at least for the current usage of HTML5, when we start using some of the semantic tags, WebGL, and some other really revolutionary features, then is going to be really cool.

rahvii said,

Just because there's no HTML5 tags on the HTML5 it doesn't mean is not using HTML5, the thing is that when people talk about HTML5 they are talking about a whole family of technologies. And then again, it might just be that depending on what browser your are using and your settings, there will be actual HTML5 or not, just for the sake of compatibility, and that might be handled on the server side.

Also, in very general and subjective terms, sometimes HTML5 is seen as a some sort of Web 2.5, that's the feeling it provides. Is like 2.0 but way better, so is not strange that as HTML5 popularizes people associate it with a new change in the way we browse. Not the consumer fault, because mainly HTML5 right now is an upgrade for the developers and IT people rather than the user (beyond the you don't need flash/silverlight), well at least for the current usage of HTML5, when we start using some of the semantic tags, WebGL, and some other really revolutionary features, then is going to be really cool.

WebGL is NOT part of HTML5, as there is a W3C specification for equivalent functionality that is secure.

WebGL exposes hardware and shader code to websites with no security, sandbox, or broker. It is highly dangerous in that on OS X it can copy portions of the screen and send it to the Web Server, and using driver and GPU flaws can literally burn out a GPU if the site really wants to be evil.

So if you think that is cool, go blow your GPU on a malicious site.

The only reason WebGL has 'any' use is Google CANNOT get Chrome to reproduce high end graphical content using actual HTML5 technologies, so they promote WebGL, which is NOT a standard and would be like Microsoft expecting users to use WebDirectX for graphics.

When Microsoft created their FishIE demo for IE9 using ACTUAL HTML5 specifications, Google couldn't get even 1/100th the speed. So instead, they created their own 'response' using WebGL that is not a standard, but called it HTML5 by rendering it to a HTML5 Canvas. (In the real world, this is called 'lying' and 'misleading' people.)

Years of complaining about standards, and Chrome and Firefox are shoving a non-standard down people's throats, at the cost of using actual HTML5 standards. This is far more egregious than anything the 'non-standard IE5, IE6' ever did.

Besides, if the world really wanted to lock into a 3D framework, they would be better off with a cross platform sub-DirectX XNA variant. WebGL can't even beat IE9 on some STANDARDS based HTML5 RIA graphical content. The reason is IE9 is using a 'compile' technology and shoving the graphical content to Direct2D and DirectX that even in the IE runtime is faster than OpenGL.

thenetavenger said,
WebGL is NOT part of HTML5, as there is a W3C specification for equivalent functionality that is secure.

This person makes a living at Microsoft.

Also Internet Explorer and Safari do not support (X)HTML5 audio and video elements.

H.264 -->MPEG LA --> DVD6C --> Warner Home --> Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. --> MPAA

JAB Creations said,

This person makes a living at Microsoft.

Also Internet Explorer and Safari do not support (X)HTML5 audio and video elements.

H.264 -->MPEG LA --> DVD6C --> Warner Home --> Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. --> MPAA


h.264 is an HTML standard, and fully supported by IE9.
Also IE9 does not support OGG and WebM by default, as IE9 uses its codecs from Windows itself. And Windows doesnt come with OGG and WebM by default, but can be easily installed. and BWAMMO! IE9 supports all 3 video standards.
And eventho it does support the others, why should there be 3 standards. Lets pick the best, oh thats h.264.

rahvii said,

Just because there's no HTML5 tags on the HTML5 it doesn't mean is not using HTML5, the thing is that when people talk about HTML5 they are talking about a whole family of technologies. And then again, it might just be that depending on what browser your are using and your settings, there will be actual HTML5 or not, just for the sake of compatibility, and that might be handled on the server side.

Also, in very general and subjective terms, sometimes HTML5 is seen as a some sort of Web 2.5, that's the feeling it provides. Is like 2.0 but way better, so is not strange that as HTML5 popularizes people associate it with a new change in the way we browse. Not the consumer fault, because mainly HTML5 right now is an upgrade for the developers and IT people rather than the user (beyond the you don't need flash/silverlight), well at least for the current usage of HTML5, when we start using some of the semantic tags, WebGL, and some other really revolutionary features, then is going to be really cool.

Then they don't mean "HTML5". HTML5 is not a family of technologies. If there are other standards, like the mentioned graphics tech, then it's separate.

Also, HTML5 on the server? What the hell? If it's handled on the server, then it's not HTML5.

I can't even be bothered to finish what I was going to write.

yawn, give is ie10 for windows 7 already microsoft, preview 2 or 3 was the last build win7 users got. Microsoft has continously ignored all comments are no win7 builds on their IE blog. We'll have to wait until rtm until we get ie10 of course which will have had no public win7 testing. This fills me with enthusiasm that it will be bug free

torrentthief said,
yawn, give is ie10 for windows 7 already microsoft, preview 2 or 3 was the last build win7 users got. Microsoft has continously ignored all comments are no win7 builds on their IE blog. We'll have to wait until rtm until we get ie10 of course which will have had no public win7 testing. This fills me with enthusiasm that it will be bug free

You do realize software has been produced before that didn't have open public beta releases? In fact, it was common until just 3 or 4 years ago.

As for IE10, it is a common code set, that would run the same on Windows 7 as it does on Windows 8.

It is the same code, and same BUILD.

Now if they were only producing an OS X version for months, and adhering to OS X design model and frameworks and then slapping together a crappy port for Windows, you might have a good argument. (*cough* iTunes)