IEEE announces next-gen 100GB Ethernet standard

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.3 Higher Speed Study Group (HSSG) has voted to standardise development of the next generation of Ethernet at 100Gbps. Although the 100Gb standard has been mooted for around a year the official announcement means that work can now begin, with all manufacturers providing input into the new higher speed networking technology.

"While 100Gb Ethernet has been touted in the press, the HSSG took the time to hear presentations and discuss the next speed jump," reported Lucinda Borovick, director of data centre networks at analyst firm IDC. "Ultimately, it was perceived that the ROI requirements would be balanced by the investment in the 10x increase in speed.

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Sleeperfs2 (The right hand )
[size=3]b]I like all your up's and down's and It was a good read... if you could tell me what cable would run that fast I would like you to say. You should read up on hong kong and the like so that you can know how it's to be run Have fun and give me some more old time reading.

LOL! Who's dump enough to use this for just storing data on a file server???
This is for larger networks... MAN and WAN.

Well.. Cat6 is currently required for 1 Gbps networks.

I don't think anyone knows the exact cable requirements for 100 Gbps networks as they are yet to be specified... ???

Quote - Shadrack said @ #15.2
Well.. Cat6 is currently required for 1 Gbps networks.

I don't think anyone knows the exact cable requirements for 100 Gbps networks as they are yet to be specified... ???


Actually, Cat5e supports 1Gb Ethernet

Quote - mattboy_slim said @ #15.3

Actually, Cat5e supports 1Gb Ethernet

It does, but Cat 6 offers better performance for professional Gigabit LAN installations.
Cat 6 provides performance of up to 250 MHz, while Cat 5e only goes to 100MHz.

I believe the initial Neowin post on this topic had a link to an article stating that it would be a fibre standard?

nop mate, 5e wont cut it.. IEEE 802.3an is 10Gbit ethernet and requieres 6a or 7. so 100Gbit wont b working on 5e for sure..prolly it wont run on twisted, but will see..

100Gbps would be awesome for core-layer switch interconnects, then 10Gbps to servers and 1Gbps to desktops. Can't wait for Cisco to implement the new standard.

This will put things into perspective:

Colonel Sandurz: Prepare ship for light speed.
Dark Helmet: No, no, no, light speed is too slow.
Colonel Sandurz: Light speed, too slow?
Dark Helmet: Yes, we're gonna have to go right to ludicrous speed.

and the sweet part of the news they they won't slip to us is that we won't see 100gb/s routers 'til 2020...ONE sweet port too! frankly I think the IEEE and FCC are sleeping at the wheel nowadays. anyone see how the industry moved forward with draft specs in 802.11N.. atleast 3 competing next-gen cellular networks. nationalism and corporatism puts the "for the greater good of man" in the backseat. Blu-Ray, HD-DVD, EVD, and I can't even remember the others now. when do we draw the line?

Yeah... well there was a problem when we said that some wifi networks were faster than wired ones. Now WiFi has a lot to catch up :|

Will we ever need a faster network after 12.5GB/s? :P

100Gbps = 100,000 Mbps = 100,000,000 Kbps
100,000,000 Kbps / 8 bits per byte = 12,500,000 KBps
12,500,000 KBps / 1024 = 12,207.03125 MBps
12,207.03125 MBps / 1024 = 11.920928 GBps


It a 100 Mbit ethernet connection can transfer at 12MB/ps I'd sure hope a 100Gbit connection can do more then 1.2 GB/ps... just multiply the 100Mbit speed by 1000

Quote - neufuse said @ #8.1
100Gbps = 100,000 Mbps = 100,000,000 Kbps
100,000,000 Kbps / 8 bits per byte = 12,500,000 KBps
12,500,000 KBps / 1024 = 12,207.03125 MBps
12,207.03125 MBps / 1024 = 11.920928 GBps


It a 100 Mbit ethernet connection can transfer at 12MB/ps I'd sure hope a 100Gbit connection can do more then 1.2 GB/ps... just multiply the 100Mbit speed by 1000

why make it so hard (and wrong)? 100Gbps = 100/8 GBps where if follow the standard

b = bit
B = byte

Quote - XerXis said @ #8.2

why make it so hard (and wrong)? 100Gbps = 100/8 GBps where if follow the standard

b = bit
B = byte

Yeah, I think the guy is confused with the notation for hard drive space.
In networking world, everything is 10 to the power.

Quote - ALUOp said @ #8.3

Yeah, I think the guy is confused with the notation for hard drive space.
In networking world, everything is 10 to the power.


100 Gbps = 12,800 MBps

heck just use google to translate it and you get that answer also..... just enter "100Gbps to MBps" and thast what you get... on networks its 2^10 but when you convert it to MBps its 2^8 thats why I did the conversion in there.. I'm converting from how fast the connection is to how fast you can transfer a MB of data 2^8 data... when you download a file and it says downloading at 700KBps its not 2^10.. its 2^8 hence the conversion

Quote - M2Ys4U said @ #8.4
Don't forget that the actual transfer speed is also dependant on how many packet collisions there are on the wires... You will never get 100% efficient transfer for this fact IIRC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSMA/CD

negative mate, since 10Gbit Ethernet its only full duplex , half-duplex is not allowed, so.. for a full duplex u need to send n receive at the same time, no collisions there.

and even counting with collisions the acutal packets lost to collisions when u talking about gigs is despicable...

I can't wait to rewire my home network with this stuff. Who gives a crap if my internet can't keep up. I could stream HD to every tv in the house, and still have bandwidth left to spare. I'd be so happy I'd **** myself.

Quote - neufuse said @ #5.1
your hard drive wont keep up :P

most people's hard drives won't even keep up with 54mbps wireless, btw.

omg.... 100GB? I guess this would help with those servers that are getting slammed for downloads, sometimes the upstream is fast enough but just the network can't handle the loads with aging 100Mbit/s networks still inplace all over the place. LOL Even at my job, there are still a few 10mbit/s hubs around here. I didn't know till I plugged my laptop (10/100/1000) into one and i was like WTF, they still make you?

Quote - SHoTTa35 said @ #3
I didn't know till I plugged my laptop (10/100/1000) into one and i was like WTF, they still make you?
ROFL

I've seen a few 10mbit Cisco hubs around, dunno if they're still made though.

Nice, can't wait to see how fast I can ping people over this connection! Considering that we are barely starting to tap the need for 1GB network and 10GB is still almost unheard of, I would imagine it will be 10 years down the road before we start seeing 100GB connections become common, even on servers.

you will probably ping the same because most of the time taken is usually dependent upon the server processing the ping request and sending it back to you.

Okay; it was a joke :-). Actually the speed of light is the limiting factor, that and the latency of the switching and interface equipment. Even on a 10Mb connection a 32 byte ICMP packet can be transferred using a single frame, so the available bandwidth has absolutely no impact.

Quote - sphbecker said @ #2.2
Okay; it was a joke :-). Actually the speed of light is the limiting factor, that and the latency of the switching and interface equipment. Even on a 10Mb connection a 32 byte ICMP packet can be transferred using a single frame, so the available bandwidth has absolutely no impact.

Yes light is a factor. It should take 133ms to travel around the earth, but in reality it takes much longer because it has to go through so many servers to reach the final destination.