Illegal downloads traced to RIAA and DHS

Remember that Russian site that keeps track of all the torrents you've downloaded? If you do, you might also remember that several IPs originating from major film studios were caught illegally downloading materials. The hypocrisy reached a whole new level today, when illegal torrent downloads were traced to the RIAA and the Department of Homeland Security, as reported by TorrentFreak.

The RIAA has joined the ranks of several major film studios by being implicated in piracy themselves. Being one of the biggest opponents of piracy – these are the people who want pirates banned from the web – and it comes as a bit of a surprise (or not) to learn that they have been illegally downloading Jay-Z and Kanye West albums. Any chance they had of passing it off as being for 'research purposes' was brutally murdered and unceremoniously disposed of when someone downloaded every episode of DEXTER.

American taxpayers will be pleased to hear that the Department of Homeland Security is putting their dollars to good use. Besides using them to shut down dangerous threats to mankind like the torrent search engine Torrent-Finder, they were also caught red handedly engaging in some piracy of their own. In fact, some 900 unique IP addresses originating from the DHS. Either someone at the Department was engaging in a bit of not-so-legal goofing off on the job, or it's all part of a project to download and catalogue every torrent on the web, all bets being on the former.

Maybe the RIAA should focus on weeding out piracy in their own office before they turn their attention to the world at large. You've got to wonder if the RIAA and DHS will end up facing the same penalties as everyone else if SOPA becomes law? 

Image courtesy of TorrentFreak

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Well, yeah.. they have to download the files to verify and prove that they are in fact what they claim to be. Anyone could seed a whole bunch of 600mb torrents with any name on them, 17 second clips of the Universal Studios logo with different file hashes associated with it, but you can only verify it by downloading it.

that site must only track public torrents. i checked out my ip and only found one torrent listed when i know for a fact there's a lot more than that

Why are people acting like the entire RIAA decided to download Dexter illegally?

OBVIOUSLY this just an individual.

Lamp0 said,
Why are people acting like the entire RIAA decided to download Dexter illegally?

OBVIOUSLY this just an individual.

That doesn't make a difference when they take people to court, sometimes even dead people... as far as they are concerned, you pay for the connection (IP) then you are responsable for who ever uses it.

The same rule must be applied to them also. RIAA is responsible for the connection, then they are responsible for who ever performed copyright infringement using their connection (IP).

Does it surprise anyone that while the RIAA and DHS are organisations, at the end of the day they employ people, from lawyers who wouldn't dare, through to receptionists who couldn't care less. The people who make up these organisations are no different to people who make up any other organisation. If you get caught using work internet for personal use, legal or not, they usually take your access away, depending on corporate IT policy.

I'm curious on the validity of this site? Has anyone checked their own IP and got a list of stuff they've genuinely downloaded?

I checked it from my phone, which has a shared IP amongst lots of other mobile users and it listed a few TV shows and such - obviously, it's possible that any of the people on this mobile network downloaded them, but who on earth would torrent on a 3G connection? The network I'm on doesn't do unlimited data as far as I'm aware (It's Virgin Mobile, FYI - although I can't be sure their IP's aren't shared by Orange/T-mobile, but I don't think they do unlimited either) so whoever did it must be nuts.

On the other hand, I checked it on my home connection and it was absolutely clean. I'm not going to admit any specifics, but let's just say I've certainly downloaded a Linux ISO or two.

Kushan said,
I'm curious on the validity of this site? Has anyone checked their own IP and got a list of stuff they've genuinely downloaded?

The site is BS. Doesnt work at all, more so with dynamic IPs.

i asked my cousin, who lives in US, do people download torrent there
he said " you can only download stuff that arent new, cuz when you download new stuff you get detected.. or something, you have to wait for the hype to wear off and then download them"

Yeah that's the same thing I do also. I download all my music and movies to verify that they are being torrented to report it later. *wink wink* And of course I delete it after 24 hours.

torrents are to on the radar nowadays.

the alternatives are where it's at (as the alternatives are much harder for those RIAA companies to bust people. but i thank all of the torrent pirates as it keeps RIAA's etc attention on those to keep them busy instead of attempting to go after the alternates which won't be easy to bust people due to you can't see who's sharing anything and can't see what they are downloading due to SSL and the places that offer 'the service' don't keep logs etc)

p.s. it's not like i am hiding anything as i am sure those RIAA organizations are aware of it but they know it's probably not worth their time to go after especially when busting people for torrents is far easier.

ThaCrip said,
torrents are to on the radar nowadays.

the alternatives are where it's at (as the alternatives are much harder for those RIAA companies to bust people. but i thank all of the torrent pirates as it keeps RIAA's etc attention on those to keep them busy instead of attempting to go after the alternates which won't be easy to bust people due to you can't see who's sharing anything and can't see what they are downloading due to SSL and the places that offer 'the service' don't keep logs etc)

p.s. it's not like i am hiding anything as i am sure those RIAA organizations are aware of it but they know it's probably not worth their time to go after especially when busting people for torrents is far easier.

I'm pretty sure usenet resellers can log everything you download. If they get busted, you might find yourself on someone's list for something you downloaded weeks ago, SSL or not.

You don't think that someone at the RIAA was downloading the content to confirm that it was pirated material? That would be a more sensible conclusion, given they cannot prosecute pirates without confirming the content downloaded was in fact pirated material.

mlekas said,
You don't think that someone at the RIAA was downloading the content to confirm that it was pirated material? That would be a more sensible conclusion, given they cannot prosecute pirates without confirming the content downloaded was in fact pirated material.

The fact that they were downloading TV shows kind of killed that, like the article says. Despite the fact that they are opposed to piracy in general, they're focused on the music industry. TV really isn't their domain.

THolman said,

The fact that they were downloading TV shows kind of killed that, like the article says. Despite the fact that they are opposed to piracy in general, they're focused on the music industry. TV really isn't their domain.

Just to make it clear.

DEXTER is a TV program.
RIAA is the face of the music "Recording Industry Association of America"

The RIAA has **zero rights** to download dexter (or any other TV/Movie) via torrents to confirm any illegal copyright infringement in tv/movies.


now... hilarity ensues when we find out what porn they watch...

mlekas said,
You don't think that someone at the RIAA was downloading the content to confirm that it was pirated material? That would be a more sensible conclusion, given they cannot prosecute pirates without confirming the content downloaded was in fact pirated material.

United States.....the land of hypocrisy. By law, they should be forced to drop all anti-piracy activity and vow to never hunt another pirate again.

This makes no sense. RIAA and DHS are hypocrites. You are suggesting that they are the United States. Besides even if you are talking about the United States its not like other countries do not do the same thing. Obviously you are a United States hater.

BillyJack said,
This makes no sense. RIAA and DHS are hypocrites. You are suggesting that they are the United States. Besides even if you are talking about the United States its not like other countries do not do the same thing. Obviously you are a United States hater.

I don't know exactly what you mean by a "hater" but with everything that is going on there I would be ashamed to be a U.S. citizen.

vladmphoto said,

I don't know exactly what you mean by a "hater" but with everything that is going on there I would be ashamed to be a U.S. citizen.

Look you can say what you want but guaranteed you have the same problems where you live. Don't act shocked with what you read about the U.S. when the same things are happening else where. Doesn't matter if it is financial, laws, or the citizens. BS is happening everywhere. And this all includes your location. Earth.

So should I be shocked about these? You ever wonder how most movies or TV shows or even music get out on the web before release? Yep, people inside the MPAA, RIAA or FCC leak it. Sure there are hackers but really, you know all the stuff that are online before the actual release date had to been someone from inside. RIAA needs a new hobby.

But the RIAA will argue that they were tracking pirates, not pirating the material themselves! As for the DHS, really? Have we forgotten that nothing we do online is private? Hell, a former employee at the facility I work for (US Navy) was looking at porn on the internet at our building! He quit before they made the connection to him, but still...