Intel bringing 'Iris' graphics to Haswell, up to 3x faster

Intel today have detailed their new graphics options for their upcoming 4th-generation Core processors, codenamed 'Haswell', and while the low-power chip offerings from the Santa Clara company will use relatively mild GPU solutions, the top-end chips will see significant boosts. With Haswell, Intel have gone from two graphics tiers to three, continuing the HD Graphics brand in one and introducing two new brands: Iris and Iris Pro.

15W Ultrabook U-series processors will use HD Graphics 5000 chips, which are a modest (50%) upgrade over the current line of HD Graphics 4000 GPUs found in lower-power Ivy Bridge processors. The real fun begins in the 28W TDP range, with those U-series chips coming with Intel's new Iris graphics processor. Intel claims Iris delivers double the performance of their previous HD Graphics 4000 chip in 3DMark11, but it gets even better with Iris Pro.

Iris Pro is the highest-end of the chips that will be exclusive to quad-core Haswell CPUs, and they'll be included in most chips with a TDP of 47W or greater. Intel has measured a 2.5x performance improvement with Iris Pro over HD Graphics 4000 with H-series mobile chips, and up to 3x with R-series desktop CPUs; as well as H- and R-series, Iris Pro will also be seen in some M- and K-series chips.

With Haswell, Intel is definitely getting serious about graphics performance of their integrated chips, and they expect Iris Pro will be able to compete with NVIDIA's discrete GeForce GT 650M. Of course it won't be quite up to scratch for those looking at building a gaming PC - you should definitely stick to a dedicated card in these circumstances - but it will deliver much needed improvements to laptop performance.

Source: AnandTech

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The funniest thing s are all GPU vendor all referring to the slowest GPU (Intel IGP) for their low end device (GT 710, Radeon 84xx / 83xx)? So the can get a higher marketing number (like 200%) without really making a descend low end GPU. If I were Nvidia, GT1110 will be as fast as today GTX Titan (down 1 level in each generation till it reach low end, and each year there is new generation that is twice as fast as previous). Than human can fight with alien. Most of us due to economic / money are unite to create not so god IT hardware
I miss the old day where most exe (read program) all cruel. Only few years old they won't run. Error you hardware is to slow . I hope we will see super duper low end that can smooth run firestorm extreme in only few year from now (if they don't forget about alien).

The funniest thing s are all GPU vendor all referring to the slowest GPU (Intel IGP) for their low end device (GT 710, Radeon 84xx / 83xx)? So the can get a higher marketing number (like 200%) without really making a descend low end GPU. If I were Nvidia, GT1110 will be as fast as today GTX Titan (down 1 level in each generation till it reach low end, and each year there is new generation that is twice as fast as previous). Than human can fight with alien. Most of us due to economic / money are unite to create not so god IT hardware
I miss the old day where most exe (read program) all cruel. Only few years old they won't run. Error you hardware is to slow . I hope we will see super duper low end that can smooth run firestorm extreme in only few year from now (if they don't forget about alien).

This looks good, but I wonder if Intel will be able to combat the potential of HSA and HUMA. Don't get me wrong, I love Intel's current stuff, but AMD's future is looking pretty damn good.
That said, Intel will have Skylake (unified architecture) around the same time AMD should have mature HUMA platforms out. I think Intel could be behind in 2-3 generations.

And this, is only good for us consumers.

This generation Intel isn't even supposed to be focusing on graphics... They're supposed to be focusing on microarchitecture design, whose main effect is to increase efficiency/reduce power consumption.

Next year is when we'll see impressive leaps in Intel's graphics.

They want to target the AMD APU processors with that... but looking at their TDPs makes me wonder what's the equivalent of an APU at such TDP at that time (What would be the TDP of the PS3?)

i7s really are amazing processors. I've got a 2nd generation mid range one and it runs Matlab just lovely. Even on my old hardrive, things are smooth and fast.

djpailo said,
i7s really are amazing processors. I've got a 2nd generation mid range one and it runs Matlab just lovely. Even on my old hardrive, things are smooth and fast.

My 1st gen core i5 laptop is still pretty quick to me, no need to upgrade it anytime soon, maybe once their SoC Broadwell is out i might consider upgrading as those will probably have amazing battery life and produce little heat/fan noise. I won't be upgrading until i have an apu that can hardware decode h.265 and the upcoming VP9 codec though, those are the future of online video.

I've got a 1st gen core i7 860 CPU (will be 4 years old this September) in my desktop, and it still runs like a champ. Sure, it's not the fastest CPU by today's standards, but it's speedy enough for me. I can't even think about replacing that. The only reason I might upgrade is to get a motherboard with native SATA3/USB3 support, but I can see that happening in another 2-3 years.

I also have the 3rd gen Core i3 (Ivy Bridge) in my Asus laptop, and the graphics are good enough to play older games/1080p videos and other day to day activities. Good to see Intel making progress in the GPU department.

tsupersonic said,
I've got a 1st gen core i7 860 CPU (will be 4 years old this September) in my desktop, and it still runs like a champ. Sure, it's not the fastest CPU by today's standards, but it's speedy enough for me. I can't even think about replacing that. The only reason I might upgrade is to get a motherboard with native SATA3/USB3 support, but I can see that happening in another 2-3 years.

I also have the 3rd gen Core i3 (Ivy Bridge) in my Asus laptop, and the graphics are good enough to play older games/1080p videos and other day to day activities. Good to see Intel making progress in the GPU department.

Yep, that's a smart decision. CPUs are so far ahead in terms of speed, that it should be one of the last things to upgrade. In your case, the only thing you may have to worry about eventually with your i7 860 is that I don't believe it supports PCIe 16x. I don't think a single GTX 680 saturates 8x, but future gen GPUs may start to get close. Regardless, probably not anything to worry about for a few years.

tsupersonic said,
I've got a 1st gen core i7 860 CPU (will be 4 years old this September) in my desktop, and it still runs like a champ. Sure, it's not the fastest CPU by today's standards, but it's speedy enough for me. I can't even think about replacing that. The only reason I might upgrade is to get a motherboard with native SATA3/USB3 support, but I can see that happening in another 2-3 years.

Yeah, my laptop doesn't have usb3 or 802.11ac or even a HD webcam or sata3. USB 3 10gbps is coming out soon so in about 2yrs intel will probably be shipping their chips with support for that too.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Yep, that's a smart decision. CPUs are so far ahead in terms of speed, that it should be one of the last things to upgrade. In your case, the only thing you may have to worry about eventually with your i7 860 is that I don't believe it supports PCIe 16x. I don't think a single GTX 680 saturates 8x, but future gen GPUs may start to get close. Regardless, probably not anything to worry about for a few years.


Isn't PCIe up to the motherboard though? The 860 is newer than the 920 I have, and it has no problem supporting PCIe x16.

SharpGreen said,

Isn't PCIe up to the motherboard though? The 860 is newer than the 920 I have, and it has no problem supporting PCIe x16.

Oops! Maybe it was PCIe 3.0 I was referring to.
Good catch.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Oops! Maybe it was PCIe 3.0 I was referring to.
Good catch.

Haha, I was kinda confused when you said that. The P55 chipset is interesting though - since it's designed for 'high-end consumer', (but not enthusiast like the X58 chipset) it's held back by chipset design. The P55 chipset can support either a single PCI-E 2.0 x16 lane, or dual PCI-E 2.0 x8 (in SLI/Crossfire) configurations.

Hopefully we will have proper reviews with games in june, i'd like to know what the gpu performance of their core i3 and core i5 laptop and desktop processors will be like. Core i7 are only in the really expensive computers so those benchmarks don't mean much to me.

BTW OpenGL 4.0 was released in march 2010 yet they have only just added it. Lets hope they have OpenGL 4.3 in their next gen apu's as they are well behind the curve.