Intel goes neutral (supports Blu-Ray too) starting Q2 2008

In a major step toward bringing an end to the much-buzzed-about format war that has pitted HD-DVD technology enthusiasts against the backers of Blu-ray technology, Intel Corp.'s CEO Paul Otellini today said during the Intel Developer Forum opening keynote that the company's fifth-generation Centrino mobile platform codenamed Montevina will have native support for both HD DVD and Blu-ray media when it launches next year.

Montevina, which is slated to make its debut in Q2 2008, will support Intel's 45-nm Penryn Core 2 processors, which are on track for a November 12 release. The fourth generation of Intel's Core 2 Centrino line, codenamed Santa Rosa, was launched in May of this year; Otellini said today that Intel has since shipped some 10 million Santa Rosa-based platforms.

Blu-ray has been supported by heavyweights like Sony Corp. and Philips Electronics, while Toshiba Corp. has been the major proponent for HD-DVD. Hollywood studios have taken sides, as well, with Lions Gate, Sony Pictures, and Fox Studios championing Blu-ray, and Universal Studios championing HD DVD.

However, as the industry's leading microchip maker, Intel's support of both HD DVD and Blu-ray throws a significant amount of credence behind the movement to bring some sort of a compromise to the two technologies, which have seemed destined to serve as bitter rivals in a market-dividing war.

Meanwhile, Intel is not the only company opting for neutrality in HD DVD and Blu-ray compatibility. Within the past year LG Electronics launched the Super Multi Blue Player, a high-definition DVD player capable of playing both Blu-ray and HD DVD formats; ST Microelectronics held demonstrations of its Sti7200 high-definition decoder chip with capabilities for both HD DVD and Blu-ray; and Broadcom Corp. debuted a complete system-on-a-chip (SoC) solution, the BCM7440, that combines Blu-ray and HD DVD, into an integrated, single-chip design.

Further, some industry watchers will likely be gratified by Intel's format-straddling stance, as analysts have predicted that universal players will eventually win out in the coming months as next-generation DVD technology evolves.

News source: EDN
Link: Neowin Back Page News Discussion (Cheers Boz)

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16 Comments

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HD-DVD its failling behind and losing exclusives, now we have to wait and microsoft would do the same as intel, we dont know maybe they release a blu ray drive to xbox360 xDD

anyways in reality microsoft and intel support to HD-DVD its irrelevant

Azmodan said,
You are either with Blu-ray... or you are with terrorists!

Theres no neutral!

Looks like the terrorists have the only decent HD media then.

FATILA said,

Looks like the terrorists have the only decent HD media then.

I sense sarcasm here... no ??

Everybody knows Blu-Ray is superior (technically), but cost more to produce.

Both HD medias are decent, but I prefer Blu-Ray.

tx83 said,

I sense sarcasm here... no ??

Everybody knows Blu-Ray is superior (technically), but cost more to produce.

Both HD medias are decent, but I prefer Blu-Ray.

You're just thinking of the format size capacity, which is currently superior yes. In every other way (from an actual FILM technical perspective) it is not.

FATILA said,

You're just thinking of the format size capacity, which is currently superior yes. In every other way (from an actual FILM technical perspective) it is not.


Blue-Ray gives you 8Mb/s more quality, (48 compared to 40 of HD DVD), yes it aint a lot, but still...
more capacity wasn't intended for nothing...

Glassed Silver:mac

You're just thinking of the format size capacity, which is currently superior yes. In every other way (from an actual FILM technical perspective) it is not.

As usual, no facts to back this FUD filled claim up.

Blu-ray uses all 3 CODECS.
Most Blu-rays have lossless audio.
Blu-ray has higher video bandwidth (48Mbps vs 30Mbps)
Blu-ray discs have better construction (no bonding, TDK armor coating).
Finally, more studio support.


You know, all the things you need to actually enjoy the FILMS.

PeterTHX said,
You're just thinking of the format size capacity, which is currently superior yes. In every other way (from an actual FILM technical perspective) it is not.

As usual, no facts to back this FUD filled claim up.

Blu-ray uses all 3 CODECS.
Most Blu-rays have lossless audio.
Blu-ray has higher video bandwidth (48Mbps vs 30Mbps)
Blu-ray discs have better construction (no bonding, TDK armor coating).
Finally, more studio support.


You know, all the things you need to actually enjoy the FILMS.

Blu-ray uses all 3 CODECS. | Check, so can hd-dvd
Most Blu-rays have lossless audio. | Loads of hddvds do as well, and Dolby Tru HD is mandatory on players unlike br
Blu-ray has higher video bandwidth (48Mbps vs 30Mbps) | ... hence why so many are pointlessly high br, inefficient MPEG2 discs
Blu-ray discs have better construction (no bonding, TDK armor coating). | Must be why they cost more, gee
Finally, more studio support. | Wrong. HDDVD now has more studio support.

Then there is the messy JAVA based software, updates of which has required some players to need a firmware upgrade, region coding, and you soon won't be able to claim size superiority once 3 layer HDDVD is released. The more expensive players (unless you own another smart piece of kit the ps3). Check your own FUD counter?

Loads of hddvds do as well, and Dolby Tru HD is mandatory on players unlike br

stereo support of TrueHD is mandatory. doesn't mean they have to use it. Guess what? The great majority of HD DVDs DO NOT.

Meanwhile: every single Sony, Disney and Fox release have lossless audio. EVERY ONE. Warner and Lionsgate have more and more lossless audio titles as well.

hence why so many are pointlessly high br, inefficient MPEG2 discs

Explain why the majority of stellar BD50 discs like the "Pirates of the Carribean" discs are encoded in MPEG4 AVC then?

Must be why they cost more, gee

Wrong again. The most expensive hidef discs are those stupid HD DVD combos which some people took to boiling to get them to play.

Wrong. HDDVD now has more studio support.

Lets check the math:

Warner: Both
Fox: BD
Lionsgate: BD
Weinstein: Both
Disney: BD
Paramount: HD DVD
Universal: HD DVD

Last time I checked 4 is greater than 3. Not to mention STEVEN SPIELBERG supports Blu-ray so Paramount titles like "Indiana Jones" have to be issued for both formats. Hence none of his titles are announced for HD DVD from Universal. The first Spielberg title? Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Nov on Blu-ray ONLY.

Then there is the messy JAVA based software, updates of which has required some players to need a firmware upgrade, region coding, and you soon won't be able to claim size superiority once 3 layer HDDVD is released.

Striking out right and left I see. Firmware after firmware issued for HD DVD players just to play the films themselves.
3 layer HD DVD? Vaporware.
http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/storage/displ...0917234519.html
Not to mention HD DVD players won't recognize them.
Even with the same size, BD has 2x the bandwidth.
Region coding? Who cares. Well the studios do. New Line Cinema isn't releasing day and date HD DVD versions because of this. Blu-rays will come out the same time as the DVD versions do of their films. Enjoy the 6-8 month wait.

More expensive players? Well you get what you pay for. I get my choice of Panasonic, Pioneer, Philips, Sharp, Samsung, LG, Sony...and you get Toshiba. Or Toshiba. Perhaps a Toshiba. Or maybe a Onkyo that's a re-badged Toshiba.


Why people make so much noise about lossless audio? True is that in any LIMITED SPACE ENVIRONMENT lossy audio codec beats crap out of any lossless codec. If someone says that he can hear difference between AAC 320Kbps and any lossless codec (zillion Kbps) then this person is self delusional liar and don't have clue how human ears work. If he insists on hearing difference then ask him if he can see microbes with naked eyes too.

Of course they don't care about lossless when they can't have it...

So if someone can tell the difference between the original CD and a compressed version they're full of it. Right.
Multichannel film soundtracks are much more demanding than pop music for one thing. You can tell the difference by dynamics alone.

In any case, why lossy compress it WHEN YOU DON'T HAVE TO?

I think all these HD-DVD and Blu-Ray creators can gather together and:

A) Sign agreement to kill one of these formats in exchange for 50% of royalties.
B) Decide which format to kill.

Agreement (A) must be signed first so decision (B) will be objective.

This peace agreement will unlock Hi Definition technology bottleneck created by this stupid format fight. People will start to buy this technology because they will be sure about the long future of their purchases.

What's "native support for HD-DVD and Blu-ray" exactly?
To me it sounds like those new laptops will include chips that will help with the decoding. And since both formats use the same decoding, obviously supporting one of them automatically means support for the other. Which doesn't mean intel has gone 'neutral'. Plus, companies like intel and microsoft, they can claim they are exclusive, but their products have to "support" both formats, due to the dominant position in their respective markets and all that crap.

Windows vista can perfectly recognize a BD-ROM disc and that doesn't mean microsoft is neutral.

Julius Caro said,
What's "native support for HD-DVD and Blu-ray" exactly?

It just means that in order for notebooks to be eligible for getting the Centrino 2 certification (among other requirements), they must have Blu-Ray/HD-DVD combo drives in them. At least that's what I think the article is getting at.