Intel increases warranty on SSD Drives

For those of you that have not already taken the plunge in switching your computer to a Solid State Drive, Intel has announced that it is increasing the warranty on the 320 series of Solid State Drives.  This move could be considered as unexpected, because many other companies are still reigning in expenses, but Intel surpassed investor expectations in Q1 of 2011.

According to PCWorld in an interview with Intel's director of Product Marketing, Troy Winslow,

“We already see that the next generation on 25-nm NAND is just as reliable if not better, than our previous generation.  We are backing up our reliability claims by giving our customers an even longer warranty term. We see this as a way to reinforce that not all SSDs are created equal.”

This extension in warranty also applies retroactively to customers that have already purchased a 320 series SSD.  Other companies, such as Western Digital and Seagate have 5 year warranties, but mostly on their upper performance tier models (including enterprise class drives).  This move would certainly place Intel into the enterprise storage market, as many companies can certainly appreciate longer warranties to protect their investments.

Although, there are a few specific clauses in the warranty for both consumers and enterprise customers, limiting Intel's liability when it's time to replace the drive.  According to the article, Intel is assuming (for consumers) 20 GB of writes per day for 5 years as a part of its limited warranty.  Furthermore, for enterprise customers, Intel is actually basing their limited warranty on a drive wear threshold, as reported by a SMART attribute, E9 (which can be checked using the Intel SSD Toolbox). Depending on the application, it would seem especially true that customers would surpass this "wear limiter" quite quickly, much like a car warranty!  The article does not mention what the exact threshold is, but this information would allow enterprise customers to monitor their drives over time, and proactively determine when to replace these drives as needed.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Twitter sued over its users violating UK superinjunction

Next Story

Leaked NoDo update available for Omnia 7

14 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

How this can be called a warranty extension based on the long list of qualifications I don't know.
As it currently stands, I'd only be prepared to use an SSD for the main OS and even then would expect to replace it after 1-2 years through risk of failure.
Conventional HDDs won't be replaced any time soon and for good reason...

Three years on my OCZ Vertex 2 which I think it quite fair and generous as it is. There doesn't appear to be a shopping list of things that would void said warranty except for the basics like wear and tear, abuse, dis-assembly etc

Inklin said,
Three years on my OCZ Vertex 2 which I think it quite fair and generous as it is. There doesn't appear to be a shopping list of things that would void said warranty except for the basics like wear and tear, abuse, dis-assembly etc

im fairly sure the Vertex 2 hasnt been out for three years.... did you mean the Vertex?

Jdawg683 said,

im fairly sure the Vertex 2 hasnt been out for three years.... did you mean the Vertex?

Sorry I meant three years warranty - not that it was three years old.

I was about to respond that Seagate had a standard five year warranty for even their mainstream drives, then I read that it was canceled two years ago.

Extending the warranty with a laundry list of "conditions"...

That won't make me feel like SSDs are more reliable than their magenetic counterparts who have long warranty and a lack of limiting conditions...

Frazell Thomas said,
Extending the warranty with a laundry list of "conditions"...

That won't make me feel like SSDs are more reliable than their magenetic counterparts who have long warranty and a lack of limiting conditions...

They're not and they've never been marketed as more reliable

Rudy said,
They're not and they've never been marketed as more reliable

Frazell Thomas have a dislike for SSD. Saying they're expensive blahblah.

Rudy said,
They're not and they've never been marketed as more reliable

They've been. Don't you remember an ad from Samsung stating how can their SSDs stand after an Earthquake, while the conventional HDD, will brake after all that movement.

Jose_49 said,

They've been. Don't you remember an ad from Samsung stating how can their SSDs stand after an Earthquake, while the conventional HDD, will brake after all that movement.

Shock force =/= reliability...

Well.. If I don't badly remember, there are several users here, in Neowin, which have reported that the estimated lifespan of their Intel's SSDs are almost over... Great grief for Intel on expanding the Warranty....