Intel offers processor overclocking protection plan

Overclocking your processor on your gaming PC rig is becoming more and more commonplace. Many gaming PC makers offer overclocking on their desktops that are fully supported by their own warranties. But what if you wanted to build your own gaming PC and wanted to overclock your processor? Now Intel is offering people an extra bit of protection for such activities.

It's called the Performance Tuning Protection Plan. This service is different from the normal three year warranty that Intel offers for its processors. While the regular warranty covers failures while using the chip at its intended clock speeds, the Performance Tuning Protection Plan allows people to purchase select processors and have them replaced for free if they fail from any overclocking efforts with a one time fee.

Here are the Intel processors that support the Performance Tuning Protection Plan along with the prices for the plan for each chip:

  • Intel Core i5-2500K      $20.00
  • Intel Core i7-2600K      $25.00
  • Intel Core i7-2700K      $25.00
  • Intel Core i7-3930K      $35.00
  • Intel Core i7-3960X      $35.00

This is for a one time replacement of a processor under overclocking conditions. Intel won't authorize multiple chip replacements under this plan. In an FAQ about this new service Intel says the company is not encouraging anyone to start overclocking their chips, and added:

While we will, under the Plan, replace an eligible processor that fails while running outside of Intel’s specifications, we will not provide any assistance with configuration, data recovery, failure of associated parts, or any other activities or issues associated with the processor or system resulting from overclocking or otherwise running outside of Intel’s published specifications.

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10 Comments

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Actually, all of intels processors for the past 5 years have a small amount of non-volatile ram that stores a log of previous events including multipliers during post, voltages, etc. So they can easily just pull the log, and kill your warranty, and that is their long term goal / direction.

Caleo said,
Not that they'd be able to tell you were overclocking the cpu in the first place.

Well no, not as such, but as you increase voltage, the output heat will get much higher, and the expansion of the internals of the CPU will increase, so with some advanced analysis you could tell if the CPU has been overclocked or if its been run without a heatsink.
Or I guess, they could place little diodes or rectifiers or whatnot on the die that are rated up to say 1.7v, and once you overclock to 1.8v they blow, so all they'd need to do is look on a microscope or use test points and they'd know.

n_K said,

Well no, not as such, but as you increase voltage, the output heat will get much higher, and the expansion of the internals of the CPU will increase, so with some advanced analysis you could tell if the CPU has been overclocked or if its been run without a heatsink.
Or I guess, they could place little diodes or rectifiers or whatnot on the die that are rated up to say 1.7v, and once you overclock to 1.8v they blow, so all they'd need to do is look on a microscope or use test points and they'd know.

It's probably costing them more money to inspect refurb CPU than replacing it and giving you a new one for free.

Anthonyd said,

It's probably costing them more money to inspect refurb CPU than replacing it and giving you a new one for free.

This.

This becomes even more apparent when you look at how many CPUs are often just downgraded to a lover class by software to save manufacturing costs.

They probably don't test ****, but want to cash in big on the care occurences of blown CPUs.

AFAIK the second generation of Core CPUs have proven to be very reliable when overclocked and cooled well!

GS:mac