Intel P965, Vista to boost adoption of SATA optical drives

Intel's P965 chipset and Microsoft's Vista operating system are expected to speed up adoption of SATA (serial advanced technology attachment) and displace ATAPI (ATA packet interface) as the mainstream interface standard for optical drives in the second half of 2007, according to optical disc drive (ODD) manufacturers in Taiwan.

Following LG, Plextor, Sony and Taiwan-based Asustek, Pioneer and Panasonic as well as Taiwan-based Lite-On IT will soon offer DVD-ROM drives or DVD burners equipped with SATA interfaces, the sources indicated.

Because retail prices of SATA DVD drives or burners are 20-30% higher than those for ATAPI models with the same functions, many OEM/ODM clients have not adopted SATA for the time being, the sources noted. ATAPI is expected to remain as the mainstream standard in the first half of 2007, but Intel's P965 chipset and Vista are expected to increase the proportion of DVD drives using SATA, the sources pointed out.

News source: DigiTimes

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Seems kind of odd that SATA is more expensive that PATA. SATA was supposed to be cheaper since serial communications are less complex than parallel. /shrug Meh...

Has anyone tried using a SATA to IDE adapter with an optical drive? I did, and it _seemed_ to work, but I couldn't get it to boot off of any bootable CDs...

thats what most of the existing "sata" cd drives are, just IDE ones with an internal IDE to SATA bridge... kinda crappy if you ask me, but they have had a ton of time to make native sata drives, so they better get off their butts and get working

I already use all my sata ports for raid sets... perhaps they need to add one more sata port (instead of the one pata port) before I jump over to sata optical.

Quote - acrophile said @ #9
I already use all my sata ports for raid sets... perhaps they need to add one more sata port (instead of the one pata port) before I jump over to sata optical.

The P965 boards have 8 SATA ports, which is more than enough for a single workstation computer. There also isn't much of a reason to run RAID on a desktop machine either (unless you enjoy buying into hype), so again, it's a moot point.

There also isn't much of a reason to run RAID on a desktop machine either (unless you enjoy buying into hype), so again, it's a moot point.

Now that surely deserves at least a nomination for the Neowin Ignorant Comment of the Day award!

Hype? HYPE??

I've had three desktop drive failures in as many years, and if it weren't for the fact that all three drives were part of RAID 1 arrays, I would have lost a great deal of valuable time and data. As it was, all I had to do was replace the failed drives and data redundancy was instantly and automatically restored. I lost nothing as a result of any of these failures. The failed drives, incidentally, were all under warranty, so all it cost me was FedEx ground shipping charges to the manufacturer: a few dollars each.

RAID is only hype if you have absolutely nothing valuable to lose on a hard drive.

Quote - Octol said @ #9.2

Now that surely deserves at least a nomination for the Neowin Ignorant Comment of the Day award!

Hype? HYPE??

I've had three desktop drive failures in as many years, and if it weren't for the fact that all three drives were part of RAID 1 arrays, I would have lost a great deal of valuable time and data. As it was, all I had to do was replace the failed drives and data redundancy was instantly and automatically restored. I lost nothing as a result of any of these failures. The failed drives, incidentally, were all under warranty, so all it cost me was FedEx ground shipping charges to the manufacturer: a few dollars each.

RAID is only hype if you have absolutely nothing valuable to lose on a hard drive.


Hype != factual information. Do me a favor and e-mail Anand from Anadtech, and tell him he doesn't know what he's talking about. The facts are out there, all you have to do is read them. You'll see a tiny increase in transferring very large files, but your seek times will increase, meaning smaller file performance may actually suffer, making everyday Windows tasks slower. What's IGNORANT is trying to argue this point without checking the actual facts. Don't just ASSume...do yourself a favor and do the actual reading and research.

Quote - djnes said @ #9.3
Hype != factual information. Do me a favor and e-mail Anand from Anadtech, and tell him he doesn't know what he's talking about. The facts are out there, all you have to do is read them. You'll see a tiny increase in transferring very large files, but your seek times will increase, meaning smaller file performance may actually suffer, making everyday Windows tasks slower. What's IGNORANT is trying to argue this point without checking the actual facts. Don't just ASSume...do yourself a favor and do the actual reading and research.

Obviously, there is some confusion here. You said: "There also isn't much of a reason to run RAID on a desktop machine either (unless you enjoy buying into hype", and I stated a specific and valid reason for doing so.

I don't need to ask anybody – including Anand – whether or not data redundancy is good idea on any system: desktop, server, or otherwise. However, if you were talking about RAID purely from a performance standpoint, you should have said so and not ASSumed that anyone knew that you were talking about that specific aspect of RAID. But since you didn't, your original comment still qualifies as an "ignorant".

Why is this though? Surely SATA adoption is natural progression and has little to do with a single chipset or OS? I still don't understand it. I have a P965 and Vista, yet I don't quite have the urge to switch to a SATA DVDRW...

Quote - Tammm said @ #8
Why is this though? Surely SATA adoption is natural progression and has little to do with a single chipset or OS? I still don't understand it. I have a P965 and Vista, yet I don't quite have the urge to switch to a SATA DVDRW...

The IDE ports on P965 boards aren't part of the northbridge chipset, so certain things are handled differently, such as DOS access to the drive. The IDE ports are being phased out.

retail prices of SATA DVD drives or burners are 20-30% higher than those for ATAPI models with the same functions

Er, on DVD burners, keep going. Newegg has IDE burners for $30, SATA burners for $90+. That's a 200% increase!

I just bought one of those $30 samsung IDE DVD burners for that very reason. I was looking at the SATA options to clean up my clear case view of the ribbons but the extra cost is ridiculous.

I am curious; will SATA optical paired with Vista finally get rid of the dreaded 'computer must lock up completely when you put in a disc as it scans it'?

It does make for a much nicer case... I bought my Plextor dvd burner with sata over a year ago and I love not having an IDE cable in my case anymore...I am pretty sure it also had a high buffer than the pata plextor..

That article is amazing. It manages to state the same thing 3 times in a row without actually explaining why this is.

I'll tell you what boosted SATA adoption for me. When my old PATA drive dropped dead. But I still didn't upgrade to a p965 board or Vista.

Because retail prices of SATA DVD drives or burners are 20-30% higher than those for ATAPI models with the same functions

The cost more for no technological reason. They know (hope) that this mass adoption of SATA takes place in 2007, so they're going to squeeze as much $$$ out of people as they can get away with.

Don't upgrade now, wait until these Taiwanese charlatans drop their prices on SATA burners. You could get by just as well with a USB burner if you don't have enough IDE ports.

Or you can get a second IDE controller card for $20.