Intel plans to put Windows 8 on phones

This week, Intel held their latest financials conference call with CEO Paul Otellini. During the call, he discussed the companies future plans for products, including mobile phones. Otellini mentioned that Intel has plans to put Windows 8 onto mobile phones.

That's right, Intel openly talked about the possibility of having a mobile phone running Windows 8. The only holdback in the near future with a full OS running on a mobile device is battery life. Intel was quoted, via ZDnet.com, that Windows 8 could run on their lowest-power Intel processor.

We have the ability to put our lowest-power Intel processors running Windows 8, or “next-generation Windows,” into phones, because it's the same OS stack. And I look at that as an upside opportunity for us.

After Microsoft announced that Windows 8 will be able to run on a wide variety of processors, including ARM, the possibilities of running Windows 8 anywhere became a reality.

It's still unclear what direction Microsoft wishes to pursue with Windows 8 on mobile devices. Although it would be great to have Windows 8 running on a tablet PC, would Microsoft ever want to release a line of mobile phones running Windows 8? Windows 8 is still more than a year away, and with Microsoft's newly launched Windows Phone 7 operating system, it wouldn't make much sense to replace the OS after a years time, but perhaps a slimmed down version of Windows 8 might be ideal for a dual-OS phone.

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> Intel plans to put Windows 8 on a phone...

...okay, but what phone manufacturer wants to build a phone around an Intel chip? Those plans mean absolutely nothing unless the manufacturers are onboard.

Or does Intel want to start making their own phones now?

_dandy_ said,
> Intel plans to put Windows 8 on a phone...

...okay, but what phone manufacturer wants to build a phone around an Intel chip? Those plans mean absolutely nothing unless the manufacturers are onboard.

Or does Intel want to start making their own phones now?


We'll have to wait and see. We're only getting 1/10 of the story right now.

mocax said,
does that mean we're gonna have heatsinks on mobile phones soon?

No, the ARM prototypes showed at the CES did not have them.

Actually what he is talking about is the Kernel and basic OS functions. Everything in Windows 8 will be modular meaning that if it has no use it doesn't load. Windows 7 is some what the same way. Windows 8 for your PC wont be the same for your phone as far as the UI. Just the background functions. This actually sounds awesome as it will be easier to sinc and make cross platform apps.

ufis said,
Actually what he is talking about is the Kernel and basic OS functions. Everything in Windows 8 will be modular meaning that if it has no use it doesn't load. Windows 7 is some what the same way. Windows 8 for your PC wont be the same for your phone as far as the UI. Just the background functions. This actually sounds awesome as it will be easier to sinc and make cross platform apps.

Finally!.......Thank you !

That's a whole different situation. But from the story above:

"The only holdback in the near future with a full OS running on a mobile device is battery life."

Does this mean that phone devs will have to start all over again? Coz on WP7, apps are developed using silverlight. Now if W8 goes to phones, thats gonna be something totally different from WP7.
But, it's too early to speculate or predict.

P1R4T3 said,
Does this mean that phone devs will have to start all over again? Coz on WP7, apps are developed using silverlight. Now if W8 goes to phones, thats gonna be something totally different from WP7.
But, it's too early to speculate or predict.

Silverlight isn't going anywhere. Silverlight is the future of development on the Windows platform.

Okay, I'm going to assume that Intel is talking about Dell Streak-style tablophones. If not, well....they need to share whatever they're on with the rest of us.

I see no reason why a Windows desktop computer and a mobile phone couldn't share the same kernel, file system, and other low-level services. The majority of mobile phones in the world run some form of Linux, so it's not beyond the realm of possibility for Windows 8.

I can see Microsoft building into the OS an application stack for running Silverlight applications, whether they be mobile apps, tablet apps, or desktop apps. For the desktop, you can ALSO have the option to run "standard" applications that you can install anywhere you want (just like now) and don't depend on the application stack.

It would be VERY cool if an application that I'm using on my phone would save state to the cloud, so that when I later run the same application on my desktop or tablet, I can pick up right where I left off, but within a UI that is better suited for the size of the larger display. Devs would write the code once, but have different application resources for screen-specific application assets. It would be freaking AWESOME, if Microsoft could pull this off.

M_Lyons10 said,
Why in the world would anyone ever want a full desktop OS on a phone? This makes absolutely no sense.

Intel wants it as it will stop the threat ARM poses to x86...

Windows 8 on a phone sounds just stupid to me, reminds me of Windows Mobile again for some reason... They tried to make a phone OS look and work similar to a desktop PC and it worked for a few years until the iPhone came with it's capacitive display and suddenly WM6.x and it's stylus driven interface felt so old and outdated...
Of course they could have Windows 8 as an underlying OS with a "mobilized" interface on top, but what's the point? Good luck running apps like Photoshop on a phone, even if we soon will have dual core cpu's in our phones the screens are too small for using desktop applications...
Windows 8 on tablets will surely work but not on phones...

Well thats dumb. Unless it somehow introduces a completely unique interface. The benefit on mobile devices is a chance to rethink the interface and go with something easier. Desktops are overly complex as is. No one wants that on their phone. Those who do, don't realize what they are in store for. It's bad enough to pass it off for a tablet but a phone? /facepalm

Xero said,
Well thats dumb. Unless it somehow introduces a completely unique interface. The benefit on mobile devices is a chance to rethink the interface and go with something easier. Desktops are overly complex as is. No one wants that on their phone. Those who do, don't realize what they are in store for. It's bad enough to pass it off for a tablet but a phone? /facepalm

love the people that can't get the basic desktop OS UI out of their head. Obviously the UI would be different. I bet so many people are thinking about using Windows XP on a 4 inch screen instead of some of the other possibilities. Think of the difference between Windows 7 Basic and Windows 7 Ultimate.. they would be different versions like Windows 8 Phone and Windows 8 Home

Lachlan said,
love the people that can't get the basic desktop OS UI out of their head. Obviously the UI would be different. I bet so many people are thinking about using Windows XP on a 4 inch screen instead of some of the other possibilities. Think of the difference between Windows 7 Basic and Windows 7 Ultimate.. they would be different versions like Windows 8 Phone and Windows 8 Home
There's a valid reason to this belief. Thus far every desktop OS appears the same regardless of the screen size or resolution. The UI scales to fit. The differences between Windows editions is very minimal and has nearly no effect on the UI.

Xero said,
There's a valid reason to this belief. Thus far every desktop OS appears the same regardless of the screen size or resolution. The UI scales to fit. The differences between Windows editions is very minimal and has nearly no effect on the UI.

Use your imagination. Imagine this: you're using your WP7 phone. You link it to a monitor and keyboard, and suddenly it's a full Windows 8 computer on your 19" monitor, or whatever. Later, you decide that you're done, and you pick up the phone and leave.

I don't think the UI displayed on the phone should ever be anything other than WP7, but when paired with a monitor and keyboard, the monitor displays the full Windows 8 experience.

Want a laptop? Keep the phone in your pocket, but have it pair itself with some kind of "empty laptop" that is only a screen, keyboard, and some kind of bluetooth like hardware to communicate with the phone. Use it like a normal laptop, but it's just a cheap dumb terminal.

rfirth said,

Use your imagination. Imagine this: you're using your WP7 phone. You link it to a monitor and keyboard, and suddenly it's a full Windows 8 computer on your 19" monitor, or whatever. Later, you decide that you're done, and you pick up the phone and leave.

I don't think the UI displayed on the phone should ever be anything other than WP7, but when paired with a monitor and keyboard, the monitor displays the full Windows 8 experience.

Want a laptop? Keep the phone in your pocket, but have it pair itself with some kind of "empty laptop" that is only a screen, keyboard, and some kind of bluetooth like hardware to communicate with the phone. Use it like a normal laptop, but it's just a cheap dumb terminal.

Thats actually not bad, although performance if running it on a mobile device would probably suck. Nice idea of carrying around your phone that can "transform" into the full desktop os.

Any application that currently runs on Windows was compiled for the x86 or x64 architecture, therefore every application that you want to run on a device with the ARM-architecture should be recompiled for that architecture.

The argument that full-blown desktop applications are going to run on phones is irrelevant, as the creators of applications have to create a different version for each architecture.

MentalDisturb. said,
Any application that currently runs on Windows was compiled for the x86 or x64 architecture, therefore every application that you want to run on a device with the ARM-architecture should be recompiled for that architecture.

The argument that full-blown desktop applications are going to run on phones is irrelevant, as the creators of applications have to create a different version for each architecture.


And that's why .NET/Silverlight is awesome.

Aethec said,

And that's why .NET/Silverlight is awesome.

I'm not familiar with .NET/Silverlight, but the same could be said for Java. The thing you might not think of the considerable loss of performance, which I think is important on mobile devices with limited cpu's and battery power.

MentalDisturb. said,

I'm not familiar with .NET/Silverlight, but the same could be said for Java. The thing you might not think of the considerable loss of performance, which I think is important on mobile devices with limited cpu's and battery power.


Considerable loss of performance? Not really. In fact, it's possible that .NET or Java code could be faster than native code in some circumstances. Any code that is run multiple times gets compiled to machine code - but the real benefit comes from optimizations. A compiler compiling native code is pretty blind when applying optimizations - for instance, which branches will be taken most often? But a JIT (just-in-time) compiler that is compiling intermediate code to machine code because it's a block of code that has been run multiple times (and is therefore believed to be likely to be run again) has the benefit of the knowledge of results of past runs and can apply better apply optimizations when compiling to machine code.

When WP8 and Windows 8 both run the same OS, and have the same information and programs on it, the only difference will be the input. I cannot wait for the day when my phone is my PC, and I simply plug it into a dock to use it like a PC, or pull it out of the dock and use it as a phone.

greenwizard88 said,
When WP8 and Windows 8 both run the same OS, and have the same information and programs on it, the only difference will be the input. I cannot wait for the day when my phone is my PC, and I simply plug it into a dock to use it like a PC, or pull it out of the dock and use it as a phone.
Agree +100 - Did you see the Android's doing that at CES?! Awesome stuff.

greenwizard88 said,
When WP8 and Windows 8 both run the same OS, and have the same information and programs on it, the only difference will be the input. I cannot wait for the day when my phone is my PC, and I simply plug it into a dock to use it like a PC, or pull it out of the dock and use it as a phone.

Here's the thing though: A desktop computer will always be faster than a much smaller phone-sized device. That is unless we invent something where size as a whole isn't a factor anymore. While todays phones are probably just as powerful as my desktop computer was in 2001, I wouldn't want to still be stuck with that when working on my projects.

.Neo said,

Here's the thing though: A desktop computer will always be faster than a much smaller phone-sized device. That is unless we invent something where size as a whole isn't a factor anymore. While todays phones are probably just as powerful as my desktop computer was in 2001, I wouldn't want to still be stuck with that when working on my projects.

As far as the technology is concerned, I think the only problem is power. We need better battery technology.

Auroka said,
I'm a little confused... o_o
Why not just stick to Windows Phone 7... for phones...

I think they will, to an extent. WP7 will mature too and it seems we might have gotten a hint of how that might go.

Auroka said,
I'm a little confused... o_o
Why not just stick with Windows Phone 7 for phones?

Imagine the possibilities with a full OS and how many apps it'd have already.

Glendi said,

Imagine the possibilities with a full OS and how many apps it'd have already.

A full OS designed with a keyboard and mouse in mind, on a PHONE. Yay!

Microsoft has officially gone off the reservation.

dagamer34 said,

Microsoft has officially gone off the reservation.

Intel wants to put Windows 8 on a phone...

Where do you see Microsoft behind this? All they said was that Windows 8 will work on ARM processors, which can be used in phones, tablets, small netbooks etc.

Glendi said,

Imagine the possibilities with a full OS and how many apps it'd have already.


Yes, imagine all those applications that haven't been optimized for touch input in any way on a 4-inch screen. If only I could have it now! I really miss not being able to run Final Cut Studio and InDesign CS5 on my HTC Legend.

dagamer34 said,

A full OS designed with a keyboard and mouse in mind, on a PHONE. Yay!

Microsoft has officially gone off the reservation.

And where did you find out that Windows 8 will not have an alternative Ui optimized for "Touch" interaction?
So far all the rumors hint exactly about this scenario: an alternative Ui to be used on Laptop/ Tablet/ Smart Display and..... Why not? Smartphones.

.Neo said,

Yes, imagine all those applications that haven't been optimized for touch input in any way on a 4-inch screen. If only I could have it now!

Yea, thats the first thing that popped into my head.
It's the same reason I can't stand Windows 7 tablets.

Soulsiphon said,

I think they will, to an extent. WP7 will mature too and it seems we might have gotten a hint of how that might go.

Because we need a phone to save us from our phones.
I personally would love to have a phone running a full OS. But I am sure by that time all smartphones will be of the 4" variety. I was taking a look at many 4" phones and I was thinking what it would be like to run Windows on it. I could even imagine using the full version of office. I mean the CPU power is there, the ram is there and teh storage is adequate, providing MSFT can make Windows use a much smaller footprint.

Auroka said,
I'm a little confused... o_o
Why not just stick with Windows Phone 7 for phones?

Because Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 are going to be the same exact operating system, when you connect your phone to a monitor, it will display regular windows, when you're using it as a phone it will be like Windows Phone 7.

.Neo said,

Yes, imagine all those applications that haven't been optimized for touch input in any way on a 4-inch screen. If only I could have it now! I really miss not being able to run Final Cut Studio and InDesign CS5 on my HTC Legend.

Somehow I get the feeling you may be missing the point of this. I am sure anyone who is realistic doesn't expect a phone to be of any use for heavy duty applications.

Subject Delta said,

Somehow I get the feeling you may be missing the point of this. I am sure anyone who is realistic doesn't expect a phone to be of any use for heavy duty applications.


So what is the point then of "a full OS running on a mobile device"?

Glendi said,

Imagine the possibilities with a full OS and how many apps it'd have already.

And apps that aren't designed for touch, or expect right click, etc., etc... This would make absolutely no sense, and I'm sure is not Microsoft's plans...

Fritzly said,

And where did you find out that Windows 8 will not have an alternative Ui optimized for "Touch" interaction?
So far all the rumors hint exactly about this scenario: an alternative Ui to be used on Laptop/ Tablet/ Smart Display and..... Why not? Smartphones.

Because simply designing an alternative UI for phones wouldn't make any sense. What would the benefits be to installing a full desktop OS? The programs that run on Windows 8 certainly won't be fun to use on such a small screen... Why would you even want to try? Tablets are one thing (And may have similar usability issues), but on a phone? Absolutely insane.

.Neo said,

Yes, imagine all those applications that haven't been optimized for touch input in any way on a 4-inch screen. If only I could have it now!

+1 Someone gets it...

M_Lyons10 said,

Because simply designing an alternative UI for phones wouldn't make any sense. What would the benefits be to installing a full desktop OS? The programs that run on Windows 8 certainly won't be fun to use on such a small screen... Why would you even want to try? Tablets are one thing (And may have similar usability issues), but on a phone? Absolutely insane.

+1 Someone gets it...

Well it seems the Paul Otellini disagree with you........ BTW he is Intel CEO......

.Neo said,

So what is the point then of "a full OS running on a mobile device"?

Desktop class apps on a mobile. There may be plenty it won't be powerful enough for, but there will be plenty that will work just fine.

Wow, seriously. Is the touch-optimization all you got to stand against this? So it's better to create those apps from the ground up on WP7 than just making a Windows 8 application mobile (touch-optimized) friendly? Right?

Fritzly said,

Well it seems the Paul Otellini disagree with you........ BTW he is Intel CEO......

And his position means he has Intel's best interests in mind, nothing more. Seriously. If you honestly think that installing an OS the size of Windows Desktop on a phone is a great idea, I'm honestly not sure what to say. Why would you want to do that when people still run out of room for their music / pictures... Not to mention the fact that you can't just allow a user to run any desktop program on their phone. Can you imagine looking at the desktop version of Microsoft Word as an example on a phone? Navigating the menus? Formatting text? There is a REASON they develop mobile versions of these apps. Not to mention the size these desktop apps take up on the computer. Again, mobile apps are designed to be lightweight (In size, battery use, resources, layout and general user experience, etc.)...

If you actually give this some thought, it makes absolutely no sense for the consumer. So, what sense does it make to Intel? Is this an attempt (Though half brained) at competing with ARM?

And it should be no surprise that Microsoft invested in developing a mobile OS in WP7 and mobile versions of their productivity suite. It simply makes sense to do so from a usability standpoint. And I don't imagine Microsoft is going to be dropping their mobile platform either. Because believe it or not, usability changes on different platforms. You use a phone with a 4" screen differently than you do a desktop with a 20" screen.

Why do you think that the "entire" OS has to be loaded on the smartphone? There are tons of services and apps that are not needed on a phone; said that there is no reason, actually technical reason, that both a desktop and a smartphone could not run on the same based kernel.

Now you can like or dislike Intel but for sure the company has people much brighter and more intelligent than me therefore I do not think that someone suddenly decided to use W8 on cellular and had the CEO make the announcement.

What MS will do has nothing to do with what Intel will do; both companies will follow the respective strategies but sooner or later MS too will want to use a single OS, or to better say the core of a single OS; the verticalization of the costs would be amazing.

Subject Delta said,

Desktop class apps on a mobile. There may be plenty it won't be powerful enough for, but there will be plenty that will work just fine.


And again, how would that work on a 4-inch screen? Never mind the fact none of those applications are designed for touch input.

Glendi said,
Wow, seriously. Is the touch-optimization all you got to stand against this? So it's better to create those apps from the ground up on WP7 than just making a Windows 8 application mobile (touch-optimized) friendly? Right?

So then you would have applications designed for mobile phones (4-inch screens and all) on your desktop computer that's being operated by keyboard and mouse / trackpad. Yes, that's clearly an ideal situation instead.

Freaking amazing. WP7 w/cloud integration, W8 w/cloud - I don't know about anyone else but from what I've seen from both platforms so far, an eventual consolidation/product-line or feature merge doesn't seem so far fetched. MS has been paying attention!

Soulsiphon said,
Freaking amazing. WP7 w/cloud integration, W8 w/cloud - I don't know about anyone else but from what I've seen from both platforms so far, an eventual consolidation/product-line or feature merge doesn't seem so far fetched. MS has been paying attention!

Yes, but putting a full desktop OS on a phone wouldn't be something that would make sense. Even if a new UI is put in place for the phone (Which would be necessary), you're still installing a very large OS on a phone with little benefit... I can see it on a tablet (If there is a tablet UI), but a phone makes absolutely no sense.

Soulsiphon said,
Freaking amazing. WP7 w/cloud integration, W8 w/cloud - I don't know about anyone else but from what I've seen from both platforms so far, an eventual consolidation/product-line or feature merge doesn't seem so far fetched. MS has been paying attention!

install 40GB OS in a mobile phone 0.o
anymobile with more then 16GB of space is still luxury seriously

Quattrone said,

Unless they are talking about Windows mobile phone 8.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking too. Intel might be looking at the next generation of the mobile OS? A full desktop OS on a phone really wouldn't be very usable...

I would bet on versions for tablets only, being built alongside win phone 8 versions. MS knows that it NEEDS hardware before it can do anything, so MS chooses Intel to supply hardware for this. So the Google/MS race to cloud ownership rages on.