Intel rumored to launch Haswell-E and X99 chipset on Aug 29

Intel is reportedly accelerating the launch date for both their next generation CPUs and motherboards. Japan's Hermitage Akihabara says that, "according to several officials," the Intel Haswell-E and Intel X99 Express chipset will be launched on Friday 29th August. Previous rumors suggested that the launch would always happen in the second half of 2014.

Hermitage Akihabara also noted that manufacturers are also ramping up their readiness for the next gen CPUs and motherboards from Intel, and indicated that they will be as numerous in numbers as the Intel Z97 predecessors.

Two X99 motherboards have already been revealed in images over at Guru 3D and LinusTechTips. Both a mATX and an ATX 'Classified' motherboard are shown and said to be priced at $250 and $400 USD respectively.


Click for larger.

The mATX configuration (left in the above image) appears to offer three PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slots, four DIMM slots, an M.2 storage connector and six SATA3 6Gbps ports. On the top right of the board you can see the power and reset buttons and slightly lower, there's a diagnostic LED.

The EVGA X99 Classified (right in the pic) features five PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slots and one x4 slot. A hefty eight DIMM slots are present, and for storage you can utilize two M.2 slots and 10 SATA3 6Gbps ports. The same power, reset and LED are present on the upper right of this board design.

If these rumors turn out to be true, it looks like we'll be spoiled for choice with Intel's next gen hardware come the end of next week. You can view a slide here of what to expect (8-cores and DDR4 support) from the Haswell-E chip performance.

Source: HexusImages: Hexus, Guru3D & linustechtips

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RAMPAGE V EXTREME

ALL THOSE CORES AND THREADS FOR WATCHING YOUTUBE VIDEOS!!!!!

hey.. I did it with the R3E, I have the cash and I WILL stimulate the market!

Haswell-E (E for enthusiast). They are essentially Xeon chips without ECC support. Branded as i7's and marketed for the prosumer or workstation market.

The cores are the same generation as Haswell but there is some major differences here.
-6 or 8 cores vs 2 or 4
-Uses LGA2011-3 vs LGA1150
-Provides 40 PCI-E 3.0 lanes compared to 16 on consumer chips. These lanes can be shared between multiple slots so you can achieve lots of different setups 16/16/8, 16/8/8/8, 8/8/8/8/8. A consumer chip will only have 16 3.0 lanes, any other lanes are 2.0.
-DDR4 and quad channel vs DDR3 dual channel
-They don't include any iGPU, where most all of the consumer chips do

Essentially a lot beefier of a chip, not just cores but the memory bandwidth and PCI-E lanes are much larger to keep these additional cores fed.

Skylake won't be here for a while but it is indeed a consumer chip. Intel works on tick-tock. Tock being a new microarchitecture and Tick being a new manufacturing process and other optimizations.

Haswell 22nm (Tock)
Broadwell 14nm (Tick)
Skylake 14nm (Tock)

Haswell is the 4th generation i Chips, making Skylake the 6th. As Broadwell isn't even here yet Skylake is a while off but will bring DDR4, SATA-Express and other functions to the consumer market as well as other improvements.

I can remember years ago when I upgraded my cpu which halved my video encoding times. Then a year later, upgraded which halved it again. These days I'm seeing what? 10% if we're lucky.

These extra cores should come in handy

My friend has the very first i5 processor released. I was using his machine a few days ago and was surprised at how fast it still is.

He's upgraded to an ssd and fitted a new graphics card.

ok, he's not got usb3 or sata6, but his machine is still fast.

Have we hit a wall?

I remember the days when within a year you could upgrade your cpu and really notice the difference.

glen8 said,
My friend has the very first i5 processor released. I was using his machine a few days ago and was surprised at how fast it still is.

He's upgraded to an ssd and fitted a new graphics card.

ok, he's not got usb3 or sata6, but his machine is still fast.

Have we hit a wall?

I remember the days when within a year you could upgrade your cpu and really notice the difference.


I'm still rocking a core 2 duo system from 8 years ago and it's still very good for what I do, even photoshopping!! (Nothing professionnal)

I don't game anymore. That's the secret!!

Mouettus said,

I'm still rocking a core 2 duo system from 8 years ago and it's still very good for what I do, even photoshopping!! (Nothing professionnal)

I don't game anymore. That's the secret!!


Same here till about a month ago.. and the only reason I upgraded my mobo+cpu to an i5 (4th gen) was because my Asus P5k-E was dying :p

glen8 said,

Have we hit a wall?

I remember the days when within a year you could upgrade your cpu and really notice the difference.

We've only hit a wall in the sense of it's what we perceive as fast... problem lately is OS's are becoming more optimized to the point they work faster on slower hardware, Look at Windows Vista to Windows 7 drastic improvement in kernel optimization then to Windows 8 even more of an improvement... and CPU's are no focused on instructions per watt instead of instructions per cycle... we've gotten to the point were it's fast enough to stop making it faster, but make it cooler and give it more cores to handle more work... I'd say it's not a wall, but more of a period of optimization

greenwizard88 said,
My 'gaming rig' is from 2009. I've upgraded the CPU, GPU, and RAM, but there's nothing so slow about it that I feel the urge to upgrade.

So Your box is like Trigger's broom, he first changed the handle, then he changed the brush but it is stil the same broom :)

glen8 said,
My friend has the very first i5 processor released. I was using his machine a few days ago and was surprised at how fast it still is.

He's upgraded to an ssd and fitted a new graphics card.

ok, he's not got usb3 or sata6, but his machine is still fast.

Have we hit a wall?

I remember the days when within a year you could upgrade your cpu and really notice the difference.

Agree'ed i'm still rocking an i7 920 upgraded to 12 gigs of ram and running an SSD. I built it 1 week after i7 was first released. Still going strong.

I have a Sandy Bridge i5-2500k in my main PC and it still has more power than I'll ever need. It handles everything I throw at it with ease.

Not denying about thermal design and other technical layout dependencies, but again if it can beat the 4th Generation along with DDR4 support, then its failure.

Finally, something called Next Generation in true sense.
I hope their 6 Core can show the difference from 4th Generation cores, otherwise it will be a joke like AMD bulldozer.

It depends on the thermal design. The cores won't be magically cooler at the same speed, so depending on the application it may not be that much faster than say a 4790K. The 4790K runs at 4.0Ghz by default, and constant all-core 4.4Ghz Turbo on main mainboards. It'll be hard to reach those speeds on more cores without therlam issues.