Intel shows off tiny Quark chip and 14nm-based "Broadwell" notebook

Intel had quite a bit to show off during its keynote speech today at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco. The company showed off the first public look at a tiny new chip made for wearable computer products along with the first look at a notebook using the upcoming "Broadwell" architecture.

The small chip is called Quark and, according to an Intel press release, it's being made for low power hardware products, which might include things like smartwatches and glasses. Intel said it would begin sampling the Quark chip via form-factor reference boards in the fourth quarter of 2013.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich also showed off the first public look at an unannounced future Windows 8.1 notebook (which was made by HP) during the IDF keynote. It was the first look at a laptop that will use the company's 14nm-based "Broadwell" design. Krzanich said that the architecture will allow for notebooks, hybrids, and tablets to have better performance and longer battery life than current products. "Broadwell" is expected to enter full production by the end of 2013.

In the meantime, Intel's next Atom processor, code name "Bay Trail", will start appearing in tablets later this year. 2014 will bring the next version of the Atom chip, code named "Airmont", that will use the same 14nm manufacturing process as "Broadwell."

Source: Intel | Images via Intel

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14 Comments

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intel these days is like the hardware counterpart of microsoft. getting into everything in desperation without anything to show for it. pathetic and sad. really.

Ci7 said,
low power/perf grabage.

*cry in the corner of the room dreaming of bleeding edge chip*

LOL

unfortunately the majority of people want low power chips these days

Ci7 said,
low power/perf grabage.

*cry in the corner of the room dreaming of bleeding edge chip*

LOL

True, but they aren't as slow as many people assume.

These chips are faster than CPUs still in use. Even the older Atom 270 CPUs were as fast as the desktop P4s that were not very old at the time the Atoms were released.

These are low end CPUs, but their performance is in the Core2 range, and their per core speeds hit the mid range AMD CPUs.

It is also important to remember that computing requirements have flatlined over the past 6 years. Outside of gaming, which also has flatlined some, the software requirements on hardware are light.

For example...
Windows 8 is faster than Windows Vista, and is even faster than Windows XP when the 1gb RAM and 1ghz CPU requirement is met. (Technically Windows 8 has a low RAM mode and can run with 256mb of RAM better than expected, but Microsoft avoided the underpowered failing that OEMs took advantage of with Vista.)

This is a massive thing to consider when OS X and some Linux distributions have increased the operational requirements significantly in the same time period.

When Vista was released, people laughed about Vista requiring 1gb of RAM to run well. Here we are 7 years later, and Windows 8 has the same requirements and runs faster than Vista, yet the OS is doing significantly more.

OS X went from 1gb of RAM right after Vista was released (even though Apple didn't get the ridicule Microsoft did), and OS X Mountain Lion REQUIRES 2gb of RAM, which most of the world never said anything about or noticed.

Today were are even seeing Android devices wanting quad core and more than 2gb of RAM which soon will be the Android requirement, while WP8 performs better on even the lower end 512mb dual core devices.


-----

With that said, I too would like to see Intel and AMD cranking out the 'cutting edge' in terms of performance, but this is not what Intel does and AMD's shift has stopped the performance race.

Moore's law wasn't about the limits of technology, but more about what was a good baseline for keeping the computing market. Which Intel still uses like a religion.


Maybe the industry needed this timeline to get power consumption down and work from a new base before cranking up performance again.

I like the idea of smaller devices and getting away from large desktop cases. It is the goal of computing integration that they will disappear from view, and be so tiny they exist in small devices we conceal.

you see i have first gen i7

i feel the urge to upgrade but nothing worthwhile around

look like i would wait for long time ,

look like i was spoiled with P4 3.2ghz -> Core 2 duo E6600 -> Core 2 Quad Q6600- >i7 940 (nahalem)
performance jump and all

i wander how much time it would last 2015/2016 perhaps?

Ci7 said,
you see i have first gen i7

i feel the urge to upgrade but nothing worthwhile around

look like i would wait for long time ,

look like i was spoiled with P4 3.2ghz -> Core 2 duo E6600 -> Core 2 Quad Q6600- >i7 940 (nahalem)
performance jump and all

i wander how much time it would last 2015/2016 perhaps?

That's pretty much the upgrade path I took as well.

Stoffel said,
So what is the difference between Bay-Trail and Broadwell?
Are both low powered SOC solutions?
Bay-Trail won't be SoC I'd imagine. It will just have the same power saving tech.

Both are full fledged x86 processors. Bay trail is based on 22nm fabrication process while Broadwell will use 14nm which means less power consumption, heat dissipation and production cost while maintaining the same performance.

Broadwell is the Tick in Intel's Tick-Tock strategy ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Tick-Tock ). The general idea is that they will have an architectural improvement, like Haswell (Tock), and then they will follow that will an evolutionary change by doing a die shrink, which makes the processors inherently more efficient (14 nm process down from 22 nm) and literally smaller as long as they don't add more transistors or perhaps more GPU cores.

In other words, Broadwell is an evolution of Haswell, which represents Intel's current lineup of Core iX processors, so Broadwell will be the next phase of Core iX processors.

So "that" is why Intel built that odd manufacturing plant on Ferenganaar - they revived Quark. (Just kidding - apparently, Quark is the Atom Alternative in the SoC space.)

Drewidian said,
I think you mean its made of gold pressed latinum.

Oh, right. It's been a while since I've seen that show.